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hot power tools


SGropp

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So what's the best method to cool down a power hand tool when you've pushed it hard and it gets hot ? Usually it's warm to the touch and there's a slight smell of hot insulation. What's too hot ? I'm talking hard use , within the tools rated capacity, but not abuse.

Run it without a load so the internal fan can cool it ? Blow it out with compressed air ? Set it aside and do something else for awhile ? Drive on ?

Just wondering what the best thing to do is. I've never burned out a tool , but they do get worked hard in my shop.

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I have burned up a good many myself. I have tried all ways but the best thing is to set them aside and let them cool down. I used to sometimes have a couple or three identical tools for the ones that I used most and alternate them letting one cool while I used the other... this scheme improved the tools life spans quite a bit. If you can arrange your work to do something else for a while that is great but I had to move fast and from site to site so when I was at a site I had to MOVE and an extra gun or two was easily paid for when they might make a hundred bucks a day difference. A little bonus is having a backup that way too. Climate plays a role... here in Missouri it can get quite warm in the summer and tools take time to cool.

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If it smells funny, compressed air is nice, but it doesn't get you a lot better duty cycle.

Depending on the tool, sometimes swarf, dust and grit clogs up the vents and taking the tool down and cleaning will prevent overheating and improve duty cycle. Not to be taken lightly though as warranties need consideration, and possibility of damage happens especially with plastic chassis tools.

It is best to leave the smoke INSIDE the tool, they work better that way.

Phil

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Power might be another consideration. Running extension cords or other issues might caused the tool to work harder because it is under powered. I recently had that issue with a jigsaw on a 50' cord. I let it rest when it got hot and used a different tool when I could.

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You may wish to also consider running air lines and investing is air tools. Air tools run on fan-motors, are less likely to heat up, and are very durable in a production environment.
Sometimes they're also more expensive but well worth it from what I hear.
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Cheap air tools use more air than more expensive versions, or so I have been told. I have checked on a few items and this seems true (orbital sander). The more expensive unit has tighter tolerances and less blow by. This relates to energy savings, and the ability to have less compressor power and air storage. The cheaper unit gets you working for less up front, and can often take more abuse (like failure to lubricate regularly) because the internals are already more sloppy.

I can also tell you that the pancake compressor you may have bought for carpentry and roofing won't keep up with most air tools. Air nailers use very little air per shot.

Phil

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I try not to loan out my electric tools.Too many have come back being held by the cord and smoking.:^(
I have yet to have some hamfisted dub kill one of my air tools.The best part about air is that when you overload or hang up they just stop.
Believe me, air tools are several steps up from electric.Lighter to work with,usually smaller for the same or better power,the air going thru keeps it cooler than any fan,quick and easy to rebuild,the list goes on.
That being said,I have been able to find used electric tools at flea markets and garage sales(ALWAYS test run B4 buying).
5" angle grinders usually go for about $10 up here.7/9" less than $30 if you look around.Look for ones that have at least a metal gearcase assembly.Some of the ones I have had luck with are Dewalt,Milwaukee,Sioux,Black&Decker(early ones,Their Wildcat 9" is a top notch tool) and Makita has proven to be a a rugged grinder too.
At these prices there`s no need to just have one and overheat it or have to stop work and change wheels from grinding to sanding.
If an electric tool is smoking then I keep in running and hit it with compressed air till it`s cool.I`ve never had brushes seize to the commutator using this method.The stop and rest after smoke has seized more than one of my lender grinders.
YMMV.
Hope this has helped.

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