louspinuso

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About louspinuso

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  1. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Thanks for the additional advice. I think the quote you're going for is: Quote by Albert Einstein: “Never memorize something that you can look up.” and that's a good bit of advice, IMO. Also, thanks for the kind words on the video and my narration. I completely understand about the background noise and that means I either need to get a good lavalier mic or narrate everything after the fact (which is the more likely option going forward). I totally understand about the backlighting but the lighting in the garage is so poor that I thought it would only help. I have an idea for lighting for the next time I do this so it should be MUCH better. Also thanks for the explanation on "buttering". While I am a technical person by trade, and my hobbies involve me working with my hands, I have a background in cooking and when coating something wet with something else wet in cooking, that generally just leaves you a mess. This is why I made the chicken cutlet reference. This is the reason you dredge the chicken in flour first, then dip in egg wash and then dip in breadcrumbs to make chicken cutlets. That egg base with the bread crumbs is the magic in chicken cutlets and making that stick to the chicken requires flour. On the other hand, fried chicken is all about soaking your pieces in milk/butter milk/whatever your family secret is and then dropping it in the seasoned flour. That flour will stick very well to the now soaking chicken pieces and then go into the fryer (again wet to dry, never wet to wet or dry to dry), but this is way outside the scope of this convesation . Also, if I understand you correctly, you're saying I should just take the greenpatch up to about 230 and once dry fire from there. My initial plan (and I may have not been clear) is to start at below 212F (the lowest my oven will go, actually, which is in the 160 - 175 F range) then after an hour, go to 200f, then wait an hour and go to 300F, then wait an hour and go to 400F, etc until I hit the ovens maximum and then let it cool in the oven, closed, until the temperature is dropped (slowly to minimize cracking) enough to handle, and then fire. Additionally you say to not use the firebricks as the floor. These are hard firebricks, not the soft ones so not sure if that makes a difference, but if I don't use those, can I make a thick flat layer of Greenpatch for the bottom to use? Or should I just go to the Dollar Tree and pickup a bag of unscented kitty litter and wet that down till it dissolves, add grog, lay it flat on the bottom, dry it again in the oven until it's got no moisture and then fire it with the burners? Just trying to get it right the first time . As for the borax directions, that sounds EXACTLY like how to make soda ash (except you start with sodium bicarbonate). After an hour or so at about 200F, the baking soda turns into sodium carbonate (one carbon is released with the H2O). This is used in salt water aquariums to raise alkalinity and pH. Yet another expensive hobby I was in for a while about 10 or so years ago. Loved it, will never do it again.
  2. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Mikey, I'm guessing mine is the economical variety. I touched some of the portions of the encapsulated wool this morning and if I apply pressure I can feel some "spring" under neath it (I feel like I can easily crack this if I press too hard) so I'm hoping that the IR lining I add will help, though I wonder about how it will affect the coating I currently have on the wool. Will the weight cause it to crack? Will the newly introduced moisture help it lock with the current rigidizer or will it cause more of a slippery surface? Just things I'll have to figure out as I go along. The other questions I have is just how thick I should go with this. My initial thought is to set the whole thing upside down (burner ports down) and put a 1/8" to 1/4" (3mm to 6mm) thick layer down and wait for that to at least set mostly. Then build my way up the sides slowly until it's mostly up the walls and flip the whole thing back right side up and apply that last center portion and then place the 2 firebricks that become the floor directly on top of that while still moist, hoping they will act like a sort of reverse keystone to keep things from sliding down. Worst case scenario, I'll just do several thinner skim coat layers allowing it to hold itself up like plaster and just keep smoothing it over as I go. Either way, I'm sure it will be fine. Thanks for all the advice, you guys are really great
  3. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Mikey, I'll take your word on that . I'm not ready to crack open another subject yet. Frosty, I understand what you're saying, and I completely understand that this is a personal problem that I have. I'm literally the sort of person that "misses the forest for the trees" is almost always an accurate description of my state of being. I get bogged down in details that suddenly bring me to an almost standstill until I'm familiar enough that I'm ready to move on, whether I need to know that much detail or not. I have gotten better in my old age and do sometimes just jump right in and do it. It's something I had to force myself to do whenever I needed to learn a new programming or scripting language (my primary job is in IT and this happens more often than you can imagine). So while in the 80's and 90's I could've run you through every option of every compiler for every language that I was using, now I just look up what I need when I need it and just use it. Now if I want to learn a new programming language, instead of breaking out a book and studying, I find a problem that needs a solution and just jump in with the new language looking up the details as I go. I just need to learn to do this with more things. Thanks for the encouragement. Lou Ok, so I finally finished narrating and editing the video where I apply the rigidizer to the forge. If you want to see it, here is a link to the video. Video quality is better, but I still need to work on lighting and audio. Thanks guys, Lou
  4. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Eventlessbox In answer to your question about the burner ports, the OD is 48.55mm (or 1.91in) and the ID is 42.22mm (or 1.67in). The depth of the port tube (on the short side on the outside) is 46.15mm (or 1.82in). I didn't get a very good picture of that measurement. I didn't measure the depth on the inside because I'm not sure if you'd want the depth of just the steel, to the end of the KAOwool, or to the IR liner I'll be adding "soon". Warning, these measurements were taken with a cheap caliper. I also took various measurements of the burners as well. Let me know if you're interested in seeing those.
  5. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Frosty, Good point about the curing. I have been trying to do some more research on this Greepatch 421 ready mix, and the best I could guess is that the moisture in the premix is actually a special type of water glass made of "silicic acid, sodium salt", of which the MDS reports that it contains between 2.5% and 10%. This would explain why it doesn't cure in the bucket (though it might dry out). Additionally, the PDS lists only 0.1% Lime, which doesn't sound like enough to cause much of a curing action, leaving me to believe that what we have here is something that needs to be dried (which is why I suspect they recommend the 100 degree F per hour method) and then fired hot. If I knew I'd have to learn so much chemistry before prepping a forge, I'd spent more time reading about the properties of ceramics and cements, but then I'd be another 2 or so years out before jumping in. Interestingly enough, I first became interested in building a forge/foundry around 2012, shortly after watching an episode of James May's Man Lab where James May melts aluminum in a cheap homemade foundry and casts it into a lemon squeezer. Before that moment, I never thought it was possible to get (useful) metal hot enough to change properties in a home environment. 6 years later I thought I had done enough research to get a premade forge up and running, turns out, I was wrong . I've also attached a photo of the forge I took this morning (Tuesday 2/19) where you can see that the bottom center is still damp. The current humidity is 89% so I'm sure I might just hang an incandescent bulb in there (60 watt in there I think should do) to help finish the drying process. Based on this, I'm guessing I have WEEKS before the Greenpatch is dry enough to bother sticking in the oven. I'll keep you all posted on how it goes. Mikey, I'll go renew my membership to my local library and see what they have on textbooks for ceramics. It's not that I don't think they'll have anything useful, it's just that I don't think I have enough of a background knowledge in ceramics that cracking any of those books would be very helpful. Most likely the soonest I'll be able to check that out will be on Wednesday afternoon.
  6. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Frosty, just went through that posting and I see that kast-o-lite is made by the same manufacturers as the greenpatch and seems to have quite similar properties with the exception that greenpatch is sold ready to use. Based on the expected temperatures/humidity over the next couple of weeks, I think I'll let it cure for about a week when I put it in my oven cold and start at the lowest setting, which is about 175, and then go an hour at a Time raising the temp up to 500. After that I'll put the burners on and adjust slowly till it appears that vitrification occurs (I suspect I'll see glowing orange on the inside at that point). You guys are full of great info. Thanks so much
  7. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Mikey, this is the stuff they sent me and it did soak into the wool fibers though I don't know how deeply.
  8. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Ok, so after a long day out at a kids birthday party and visiting with a relative that is down from NY, I was finally able to get home and... wait for the baby to fall asleep (my office is right next to his and if he hears me in here before he passes out, he doesn't). Anyway, now that he's sleeping (and I've replied with what I've found about the Greenpatch 421), I figured I'd post the photos I took today. I still haven't finished processing the video so that's not ready. I need to re-narrate it as talking with a respirator on is not recommended. Anyway, let's get started. I've resized the images here to prevent it from being bandwidth heavy. Please let me know if they are still too large. I started by measuring the rigidizer that was sent to me to confirm it is, indeed, 250 gr. once I did that I decided that I'd mix it at the recommended ratio in small batches of 100gr rigidizer to 70gr w ater. I placed 100gr rigidizer in one container (measured on a scale) and 70gr water in a second container. Once I had the right amounts I poured the water into the powder and mixed. I didn't capture an image of this, however, I stirred for about 7 minutes and the consistency was about that of medium thick gravy. I then painted the inside of the forge, top and bottom, in one half (front? is there a front?)in a nice thick layer. I then applied rigidizer on the edges of the wool in the burner port. This pretty much used up the mixture so I measured out another 100gr/70gr mixture and mixed same as before. This time I turned the forge around and did the other half and the other burner port the same exact way. Any remaining mixture I went through and found places where air pockets had formed and were showing dry wool I applied to those and made sure everything was looking good. This was about 12:45pm this afternoon. At 8:41pm, this evening, you could already see the edges drying up. You could also see the mess I left on the outside of the forge body and the burner ports. Luckily, this stuff cleans up with water so I took a wet rag and wiped everything on the outside gently and washed away the rigidizer, leaving a clean looking body. That's it for now, about as far as I'm able to get tonight. I'll take progress pictures of the drying/curing process tomorrow morning and again tomorrow afternoon in the hopes that you can see how it's holding up.
  9. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Frosty, no offense taken. I've got thicker skin than that. Living in an area where broadband is so prevalent and easy to get makes me forget that there are still people out there on <1Mbs so I appreciate the reminder. As for shaky cam/music thing, I agree 100% with the shaky cam which is why I generally video things from a mount in one angle. If I have to move the whole camera, that move gets cut out. I remember when Blair Witch was all the rage and I just couldn't watch it without getting motion sick because of it. Now it seems every horror movie is filmed like that, I get it. As for the music thing, it's a mixed bag for me. If I'm watching a video that has a fast forwarded section that has no narration or talking during it, I like music that is quiet just playing in the background, but if the person/people are speaking, no music at all. It just detracts from trying to understand what is going on. I do understand that concrete cures as opposed to drying, but this is my first foray in refractories and it seems that many of them use vastly different instructions for how to prepare them (from letting them dry and firing to allowing to cure). I am very seriously trying to find the literature for this product but all I've found so far is the SDS and a PDS. The SDS, from their website, only has this section on "handling" 7. Handling and storage Obtain special instructions before use. Do not handle until all safety precautions have been read and understood. Keep formation of airborne dusts to a minimum. Provide appropriate exhaust ventilation at places where dust is formed. Do not breathe dust. Do not breathe dust. Avoid prolonged exposure. When using, do not eat, drink or smoke. Should be handled in closed systems, if possible. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment. Wash hands thoroughly after handling. Observe good industrial hygiene practices. Which offers little to no information. The PDS, does offer a bit more information (though maybe not as clear as I would like): Description: 3200°F, Wet, Air-Setting, Thick Patching Mortar Features: Can be used as patching material, a coating, and for bonding brick such as EMPIRE® S, CLIPPER DP®, KX-99®, KX-99®-BF, and KRUZITE®-70. Supplied as a thick patching mortar; can be field-adjusted with water as needed. Can be fired-in faster than regular high-alumina mortars. Uses: Boilers, brick plants, steel mills, asphalt plants, and iron foundries. Protective coating over ceramic fiber modules. And then later this: Mixing and Using Information Per 55 lb Pail Material is supplied ready to use and can be field-adjusted as required. Water Required—Thin Trowel Gallons Liters 0.125 0.45 Water Required—Dipping Gallons Liters 0.625 2.3 For detailed mixing and using instructions, contact your HWI representative or visit www.thinkHWI.com. Heatup/Dryout Schedule Not applicable Installation Guidelines See HWI Installation Guidelines M-1—Wet Mortars—Ready to Use. And while typing this I thought maybe just google for the document name (HWI Installation Guidelines M-1—Wet Mortars—Ready to Use) and I found this PDF which seems to have a bit more data in it on how to prepare/use the product, namely: Use Drinking water between 60 and 80 degrees F if required. There is no cure or set time needed for this product A weep hole should be used (guess I'll be drilling one before applying) to allow moisture to escape to prevent spalling or probably lining damage dryout and heatup are governed by brick requirements, typically 100F per hour (indicating that maybe once it's cured it doesn't require heatup) So based on this, I think my next steps are: Wait for rigidizer to dry completely Drill a couple of weep holes in the bottom of the forge body Apply Greenpatch to the lining in the forge Cover all the ports with wet towels Wait for the Greenpatch to cure (even though the directions specify that there is no cure or set time needed) I'd rather let it go slow to avoid rapid shrinkage and cracking install burners and fire Looks like I've got some work ahead of me for the next couple of weeks.
  10. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Mikey, since I have a forge that is open on both ends, I should probably cover the ends with a damp towel also. Or do you recommend something sturdier? I just rigidized and took a tone of pictures and video. I'm just going to go through the process of cleaning up the pictures and video so that they actual give actual information (instead of just distracting background noise). I'll probably be posting those tonight as I need to get ready to go to a kids b-day party this afternoon. Tomorrow afternoon I'll also post an update on how dry the rigidizer is (I've read it should only take 24 hours to dry and the humidity is pretty low for FL right now, only 55%, lol), I suspect it will be Tuesday night before everything is dry enough to put the refractory lining on. Frosty, thanks for the encouragement and information. I certainly wouldn't want to damage the wool/liner and breathe in any of that nastiness. Another thing I'm going to do, though I'll keep that separate and possibly not even post a thread here at all unless people are interested, is rigidize my cousins wool in his devil forge. He purchased his before they sent rigidizer and I've been told by the ceramics place I picked up the "Greenpatch 421" that it can be used, when watered down, to rigidize wool, and then, once dry, apply as a refractory lining. Since his wool is a little beat up, I'm not sure how well it will work, so if it's really horrible, I'm just going to order him some new Kaowool and do it from scratch. One final question, in general how hot will the outside of the forge get, specifically the metal housing? I'm only asking because I think I'd like to paint the outside with some high heat paint, if possible, so it's not just a boring flat black. Obviously that's not necessary, but I think it would be nice to give it a little bit of flare. Thanks again everybody.
  11. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Frosty, how about I film it and post it to YouTube so that people interested in watching it happen can. And I'll also take pictures from time to time through the process and post those directly to the thread? The YouTube link shouldn't waste much in the way of bandwidth as the browser should not load the video from another site, though the forum software may load the preview image for the video. Eventlessbox, I'll take measurements with my calipers and post them. I'll give you the various ID's and OD's for the everything I can get at. Mikey, If I understand you correctly, you're saying I could use flat washers instead of stuffing that wool in place. Would the washer need to be welded down? or can I just place it there so it basically covers everything, but isn't actually fastened? I'll take pictures tomorrow to clarify. Thanks all for the feedback!
  12. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    MaxwellB, thanks for the info. I was wondering about that and whether those gaps actually needed to be sealed with the wool. My thoughts were more along the line of, if I do put that wool in those gaps, do I need to rigidize that also? And if I rigidize it, do I also need to seal it with refractory? I was going to rigidize last night, but my brother and his wife came by and we were hanging out till about midnight at which time I didn't want to narrate what I was doing while possibly slurring (I shounded totatatally fiiiiine to myshelf). Hoping that tonight I'll be able to put the rugrat to bed early and work on it, but I doubt it as my wife has made plans for dinner at my brother's house.... So Sunday? At least I'm not working on Monday due to presidents day so I should be able to get some stuff done by then. Hopefully. Lol
  13. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Excellent, I'll keep this in mind. I'll be working on this over the weekend. If the temperature holds out overnight (Florida weather can be so nice in February), I'll put the rigidizer on in my garage later and then let it dry overnight. I'll fire it up on Saturday morning to make sure it's hardened and then Saturday night I'll "butter" and apply the greenpatch (and then start the thermal dryout in the oven). I'll probably film *most* of this and put out another video including your suggestion to drill out a small hole. Once again, thank you.
  14. louspinuso

    Got my Devil Forge 2 burner in 20 days early

    Thank you Mikey. When you say a seal coat, do you mean something like this? This is something that I can pickup locally and the description says, under "Used as surface coatings" section, "Greenpatch can be diluted with water and "painted" on, or applied in layers from 1/8" to 2" thick. Thermal dryout may begin immediately. A maximum heatup rate of 100°F (55°C) per hour is preferred." Not sure how I'd accurately heat it at 100F/hour, maybe stick the whole thing in my oven? I think the lowest my oven gets, however, is 175F. Thoughts?
  15. So as I mentioned in my introduction, I purchased a Devil Forge DFSW2 forge. I've seen mixed reviews about them online, however, I've also had the opportunity to use one that I borrowed and it seems to work really well (to a newb like me). This, along with the fear of building a burner poorly, led me to find one on Ebay for $179 shipped. A lot of what people were complaining about in the older versions of this forge was that the regulator is for European propane tanks and that the wool needs to be encapsulated. Well, the forge now comes with the EU -> US propane adapter and 250 grams of rigidizer that you have to mix (10:7) with water and paint on to the ceramic wool. The only thing I'm not clear on is if it's still required to have yet another coating over the rigidizer (I've heard mixed answers). Anyway, I figured I'd do an unboxing video of the forge to show what comes in the box and how it's packaged. I'll probably do a video when I have some time (probably this weekend) to paint on the rigidizer. Sorry for the quality, my camcorder was set to the wrong setting. Let me know what you think.