nett

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About nett

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    Sacramento Valley, California

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  1. I used the top of a water heater to build my first forge. All the flanges were perfectly spaced for 3/4 inch pipe legs. Air is an Industrial Xerox
  2. Old growth Kahikatea would be a suitable pine with it's very tight growth rings, but I understand the tree is on the endangers species list and you can't drop them without a permit. Perhaps you could score one of the old stumps that are being been harvested from the swamps.
  3. nett

    Setting Handles

    I wonder if someone could install a zerk fitting on the head of a hammer and periodically inject a shot of mineral oil? I once read covered wooden bridges were often fitted with an oiling system to extend the life of the bridge; I figure it could adapted to hammers , too. Just an idea. A shot of WD-40 right at eye is probably the best way to deliver mineral oil to the head of a hammer. It make a reasonable finish for the handle, too, just ask Hofi. Steel wedges should be driven in at a 45 degree angle, as apposed to perpendicular to the wood wedge, so the wood will expand in both directions. The wood wedge gets you close, but the steel wedge locks it up. Some will argue the steel wedge is tapered in both directions and would be accomplish the same thing if driven in perpendicular, but I've seen many hammer handles that were split by the steel wedge, negating any lateral locking movement. Check store bought hammers, especially the high end wood handled ones and you will see the steel wedges driven in at an angle.
  4. Country_boy, we both agree the operative words are "particularly with good government oversight".
  5. Jeff, each forge was individually vented. Check this other school shop photo that shows how it was done. McKinley School shop power for the air supply and venting was on the back wall. On edit: note all the Fisher anvils.
  6. I suggest you return to Plumpton to earn your Blacksmithing and Metalworking National Diploma. In the course of the two years program you will be introduced to many aspects of the industry and instructed how to present yourself, and what you have to offer, to potential employers in a professional manor. This course is designed for those wishing to extend their basic knowledge in blacksmithing and metalwork. It is based around six core units and twelve specialist unit areas, which include six core units - small business operations, drawing practice for blacksmithing and metalworking, forging techniques, industry experience. The twelve specialist units from the following list forge practice, blacksmithing processes, blacksmithing skills, business planning, design principles, small scale design, horseshoe production and large scale working large scale design.
  7. Thomas Dean's metal detector idea has merit. I don't have a detector, but I guarantee I would have scoured the area throughly . Tongs, busted hammers, punches, chisels, bolsters....no telling what could have been tossed aside in the past as useless junk. Also, any standing structures - sheds and barns - often hold little gifts quietly stashed up in the rafters.
  8. The 400 g box got pinched. It's now a 350g bag. ###350g bag Borox### for sale - TradeMe.co.nz - New Zealand
  9. Bruce, the second photo you posted shows what appear to be two chain links in the background. Those two links of enormous proportion are way to big for a 500 pound anchor! What's the story?
  10. Obama and gang get their way and shut down coal mining? Not hardly. The best we could wish for is a moratorium on building NEW coal fired power plants. We cannot afford to shut the existing coal plants without a viable alternative fuel like natural gas, and converting the thousands of plants would take years. Nuclear power plants are presently, and ironically, the most environmentally friendly source of electricity we have today. Expect to see more nuclear power plants built in the coming decades (it will take that long just to slash through the red tape). By the time construction begins, the environmentalist will still be squawking, but not quite as loud. Expect them to shift the debate to ownership; private verses public ownership. Talking point: would you like to see Halliburton, Enron, or Kellogg Brown and Root controlling the plant? In the mean time, my sister will continue to purchase entire train loads of cheap western strip mined coal for the power plants in Nevada and the underground mines in the east will still pull out quality coal for our hearth.
  11. nett

    too hard

    Thomas, your responce is absolutely correct. I never gave any thought beyond removing the part that had been epoxied on. Now, if the blade was in excellent condition and you did not want to alter it in any way, my approach would work, or better yet, a common kitchen oven would do the job. I find myself removing epoxied fittings from objects that are to big for the oven and that's when I find the heat gun is my friend.
  12. nett

    too hard

    The wood handle can be salvaged if it was epoxied. All epoxies I work with soften around 150 degrees F. A good heat gun can do the job, but remember, wood is a good insulator so it takes time for the heat to migrate to the center - don't rush it with a high setting. Medium heat for long time is much better the HOT heat for short time. After the handle is removes follow instructions to normalize, harden and temper.