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anvil Identification


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#1 Steeler

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 01:12 PM

The maker’s mark is faint and dinged up. It looks to me like a left - right arrow( rectangular box with arrowhead at both ends) with "STILETTO" stamped within. I could be way off and stand to be corrected. The anvil is 25 inches long and 10.3 inches tall. The .5” thick table is 3.8” wide and is in good shape with a 1” hardy hole and a .5” pritchel hole. The feet provide a base of 9” X 10”. The “124” seems right for the weight in pounds when I heft it. It has a loud ring and good rebound. The tip of the horn needs some attention. I waited a long time for this anvil to come my way. I have $45 invested in it. I found it as a garden ornament at an estate sale. It was going to be left behind in the sale of the property. This was a gift from the blacksmithing god.
My previous anvil was a chunk of railway track. I don't plan to part with this anvil and would appreciate any information about it and also any comments that you might have.

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#2 Steeler

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 01:26 PM

[img]http://http://i887.photobucket.com/albums/ac72/howie-pics/Anvil/a.jpg[/img]
[img]http://http://i887.photobucket.com/albums/ac72/howie-pics/Anvil/b.jpg[/img]
[img]http://i887.photobucket.com/albums/ac72/howie-pics/Anvil/c.jpg[/img][img]
http://http://i887.photobucket.com/albums/ac72/howie-pics/Anvil/d.jpg[/img]

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#3 Steeler

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 01:35 PM

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#4 Steeler

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 01:36 PM

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#5 Steeler

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 01:37 PM

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#6 Bentiron1946

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 04:02 PM

WOW! You certainly did get the blessings of God fall on you to get a nice anvil like that for $45. I'm sure Thomas can tell you what kind it is. You should get much forging joy out of that anvil. One bit of advice, don't use an abrasive disk on the anvil to clean it, use a wire brush to get rid of the rust. The abrasive disk removes too much material.

#7 Sask Mark

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 04:38 PM

That depression in the base makes me think it might be a Trenton. However, they didn't usually stamp the weights on the side like that. Is there anything stamped on the front of the feet?

#8 ThomasPowers

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 06:50 PM

I'd go with Trenton too stamped in a diamond <> though sometimes it's stamped Trexon.

If so a good brand and made in Columbus OH. Cherish it!
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#9 Steeler

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 11:21 AM

Yes, sometimes fortune smiles on our persuits.
Thanks for the cleaning advice. I am trying to ding the burrs around the table and horn back where the metal came from instead of grinding it off. Someplaces it works and some places not.

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#10 Steeler

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 11:58 AM

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Well now! There are some numbers stamped on the front feet. 21569.
I doubt that the maker's mark is Trenton or Trexon since the S at the beginning and the O at the end are clear enough to read and the logo is definately a left - rifgt arrow. Maybe it's real oddball? I will try to get a better photo of the stamp.
I do appreciate my good fortune in locating this anvil and at such a bargain price.
Any more ideas or comments are much appreciated. Thanks guys!

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#11 Sask Mark

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 12:12 PM

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Well now! There are some numbers stamped on the front feet. 21569.
I doubt that the maker's mark is Trenton or Trexon since the S at the beginning and the O at the end are clear enough to read and the logo is definately a left - rifgt arrow. Maybe it's real oddball? I will try to get a better photo of the stamp.
I do appreciate my good fortune in locating this anvil and at such a bargain price.
Any more ideas or comments are much appreciated. Thanks guys!


Sometimes the manufacturers made anvils for hardware stores or distributors and stamped the store's name instead of their own. I don't think 'Stilletto' would be the maker, just the store or distributor.

The fact that the weight is on the side and not stamped on the left front foot is a little atypical for Trenton. I'm wondering if it is perhaps an Arm and Hammer? They also used cast steel bases with that depression like Trentons, but they usually stamped their weights on the side like yours. One thing that is different from regular Arm and Hammers is the underside of the heel seems to be finished quite nicely whereas 'normal' Arm and Hammers had a rougher underside of the heel from the fullering process in drawing the heel.

#12 Steeler

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 12:26 PM

Thanks Sask Mark. That gives me some more things to check on for my research, but right now I'm going to build some hardies. Thanks.

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#13 Sask Mark

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 12:40 PM

Or, it seems you might have an oddball. Just send it to me as you don't want to have anything to do with oddballs, do you? ;)

Edit-I just did some more reading in my copy of Anvils in America and your anvil does not appear to be a Trenton. If the anvil was a Trenton, the serial number 21569 would indicate a year of manufacture of roughly 1901. Early Trentons had an hourglass depression, and did not start adopting the oval depression until 1907 with the changeover complete in about 1910.

If the Anvil is an Arm and Hammer, the serial number would indicated a year of manufacture of 1913-1914. This year would fit into the oval depression scheme on the cast steel bases as seen on your anvil.

Mr. Postman also states that some Swedish anvils had the oval depression as well, but yours appears to be forged, not cast, so I'm going to guess that it is an Arm and Hammer.

As for the name stamped on the side, it is not listed in anvils in America. I understand that there is a new edition in the works. Perhaps it will show up in the new edition if Mr. Postman has uncovered any other examples. You might want to contact him and let him know you have an example and see what he says as he is far more of an authority than I am.

#14 Dragons lair

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 10:41 PM

There were also imported trentons. Bocker(spl) worked with/for trenton. Have to dig out AIA to check. It seems that back in the day you could have a major manufacture put your name on them if ya ordered enough. Looks like a great one.
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#15 ThomasPowers

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 11:18 AM

Arm & Hammer and Trenton both were in Columbus OH, (You can still see the remains of the old grinding wheels in the river below where one of their factories was) and so seemed to have used the same bases at times (as well as workers going from one to the other).
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#16 jmeineke

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 12:16 PM

Arm & Hammer and Trenton both were in Columbus OH, (You can still see the remains of the old grinding wheels in the river below where one of their factories was) and so seemed to have used the same bases at times (as well as workers going from one to the other).


Hey Thomas - Do you by any chance know where that factory was located? Is there anything left of it? I'd like to check it out sometime. If there's anything left It might be cool to get some pictures.
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#17 ThomasPowers

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 06:23 PM

Yes I do, I've been there several times. After the anvil factory shut down they were an edible oils plant---ran hydrogenation *inside* the city---scary!!! When last I was there they were converting to condos.

I tracked it down as one of the ex-workers said they left a line of anvils on the edge of the drop off to the river when they shut down and I wanted to see if any had fallen down and not retrieved.

I need to dig out a better map google maps doesn't get down to the alleyways I took. It's close to where 670 crosses the river (to the north of it.) I followed the river till I came to the area with the grindstones sticking out of the water---over a dozen of them when I was there about 4' in diameter and 1' thick natural sandstone (and so ruined by the immersion)


AHA! http://www.shortnort...rrisonPark.html "The factory was originally built in 1883 by Capital City Dairy, makers of “Purity Butterine,” a margarine-butter spread. Since then, Sinclair Oil, Columbus Forge & Iron Company, Stokely-Van Camp, Dresser Industries, Washington Breweries, and finally AC Humko all occupied the site."

Columbus Forge and Iron was the anvil maker!

Looks like if they have done what they say they will it is totally gone and even the river probably ravished as well. I wonder if they found any anvils? Old industrial site way too much iron in the ground/water to uise a metal detector, sigh.

The other factory was near I70 and High street (west of that) on the south side IIRC.
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#18 Steeler

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 12:00 AM

EUREKA!!!! Gotta love the internet. The Baker & Hamilton Co. of Sacramento ( since 1849) sold the Stiletto line of tools that included forges and just about any tool that you could name. Their catalog was huge! There are lots of vintage Baker & Hamilton / Stiletto tool catalogs around. Anybody got one or know of someone who might have one? The Stiletto trade mark is still in use today and is virtually identical to the mark on my anvil. All that I have been able to find under the trade mark is a line of high end hammers and pry bars for the building construction industry. Google Stiletto Tools if you would like to see this historictrademark. Baker & Hamilton manufactured some of their products, but I don't know yet who made these Stiletto anvils.

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#19 Sask Mark

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 12:21 AM

Very cool! It's interesting to see that their logo hasn't really changed since your anvil was made.

#20 jmeineke

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 12:22 AM

Yes I do, I've been there several times. After the anvil factory shut down they were an edible oils plant---ran hydrogenation *inside* the city---scary!!! When last I was there they were converting to condos.

I tracked it down as one of the ex-workers said they left a line of anvils on the edge of the drop off to the river when they shut down and I wanted to see if any had fallen down and not retrieved.

I need to dig out a better map google maps doesn't get down to the alleyways I took. It's close to where 670 crosses the river (to the north of it.) I followed the river till I came to the area with the grindstones sticking out of the water---over a dozen of them when I was there about 4' in diameter and 1' thick natural sandstone (and so ruined by the immersion)


AHA! http://www.shortnort...rrisonPark.html "The factory was originally built in 1883 by Capital City Dairy, makers of “Purity Butterine,” a margarine-butter spread. Since then, Sinclair Oil, Columbus Forge & Iron Company, Stokely-Van Camp, Dresser Industries, Washington Breweries, and finally AC Humko all occupied the site."

Columbus Forge and Iron was the anvil maker!

Looks like if they have done what they say they will it is totally gone and even the river probably ravished as well. I wonder if they found any anvils? Old industrial site way too much iron in the ground/water to uise a metal detector, sigh.

The other factory was near I70 and High street (west of that) on the south side IIRC.


That's too bad... Would have liked to go take a look - sounds like it's long gone.
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