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I Forge Iron

Punchbag brackets


philip in china

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Does anybody have any experience of making brackets for punchbags? I have to make 5. The room has a low concrete ceiling so I could hang the bigger ones from there and possibly make wall brackets for the small lighter ones. Any advice would be welcomed.

BTW we had a big aftershock this evening just before 6pm. I don't know if any damage was done but there could wellbe problems.

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No personal experience with forging punchbag brackets, but a Google image search for "punchbag brackets" will render more than 3000 results.

Study the "store bought" models, then put your brain to work.

Are you forging or fabricating?

Don

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I've always just used eye-bolts screwed into the over head joists. I did this in an apartment I lived in in Orlando, and it did manage to shake the whole apartment. It was a three story apartment, and I was on the second floor. The upstairs neighbors claimed that I was knocking stuff off of walls and shelves. I wonder if brackets rather than eye-bolts would have eliminated that...given it a better anchor.
Mickey

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My heavy bag hangs from a steel roof in a barn and still shakes the building. The speed bag is screwed to 2x4's on a wall in my shop and it makes noise and shakes the siding. I just don't think you can get away from it except maybe in a completely concrete structure. Most boxing gyms are industrial buildings and the bags are set up for hard regular use.

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Just on the off chance anybody is reading this thread and anybody cares....

Put 16mm rawlbolts in what had been 14mm holes but in a soft wall. The brackets came away very easily. The holes are as oversized as that! So I got the 14mm spindles and cemented those into the now about 20mm holes. The foot of the spindle is 14mm. I didn't mice the thinner part but it is maybe 7 or 8mm so there should be plenty of cement in there. So now I wait to see how it all holds up once the cement is dry.

How these guys ever made the great wall I just don't know. These walls won't be here in 300 years. I doubt they will last 30.

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I am reading and I care (big hug...)

I think you might want to build a large skeleton frame and then bolt that to the wall or ceiling. In other words, envision the skeleton holding the whole thing and that it theoretically could stand alone assuming it could remain upright on impact. Since that would make it unbearably heavy, make it out of square tubing (50mm?) or pipe with tabs welded on for the bolts - then fasten to the building structure.

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I read and I care.
And I do have a bit of experience with such things.
Firstly Don't get a overhead masonry bolt ( eg Ramset) based on the weight of the bag alone get the biggest one you can manage because you also have to account for the stress of the bag jumping around.
Secondly after getting sick coping "Flak" about rattling the house I now have a sedan ( car) inner tube around the rafter ( over the top so the end dangles either side) with a largish stainless hook through the two ends then the bag straps through that. I cut small grooves in the hook so I could "mouse" the ends of the hook with wire so the bag can't bounce off. The tube takes 90% of the bounce and rattle off the supports.
Hope this helps.
Carl

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To relieve some stress, consider adding a spring just below the anchor, this has worked for me in the past with moveable heavy hanging objects, it lessens the stress on the anchor. I got this idea from the gravity chairs, they use springs to get a little bounce, but the effect is also very beneficial to the attachment.

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The latest chapter.... I relocated the baby bag onto a solid wall and that is OK. I put two bags hanging from brackets in the poured cement roof but.... when I drilled for the bolts (6 holes for the big one, 4 for the smaller when I looked into the holes I had made I could see daylight. It is now raining in of course so if ever the rain stops I need to get up there with a silicon gun. What should have been a very easy job is rapidly reaching epic proportions.

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