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Found 42 results

  1. I couldn't find this posted here before, so I thought I'd post it up. From Lewis Razors: He has a build video too, the most interesting step of which is hammering the brass (copper?) tube to narrow the ID sufficiently to hold the mig tip. Cheers.
  2. Hi I have just lit up my small home built gas forge for the first time. It is firebrick lined with refractory cement lined with Metrikote. There are some flaking issues with the latter but that is not my question here. I bought the burner online from what claims to be a blacksmithing school here in the USA who make them to help support their business so I figured it was a safe option. I had lit the burner for a few minutes and it was 'on' and there was blue flame visible through the 'ports' you can see high up near the gas connection and a nice roar but the flame coming out of the business end was almost invisible and did not seem to be generating huge heat. I tried heating some very thin stock and it got hot but nowhere near orange heat. Suddenly, and for no obvious reason I could see, the flame 'switched on' and became a roaring pale blue jet projecting down inside the forge chamber. This brought my stock to red heat in a matter of seconds. I then put in a thicker piece (about 1/2 inch square, some sort of small pry bar) and that was at red heat in very short order. I would love to know what changed and how I can get that flame back, I turned the gas off and then lit it again and I was back at the low heat flame, playing with the propane regulator did not seem to make any difference. The burner itself has no adjustments I can see apart from how far into the chamber the end projects (at the moment the end is probably 3/4 inch inside the firebrick - should it maybe be nearer the inside surface of the forge?) Looking forward to any suggestions, I want that flame back Pictures of the burner and the forge in use attached Thanks Dave
  3. Hey Guys. The Edmonton Blacksmith Shop is looking at selling their forge burners separately. They have put them up on their website to gauge interest to see if they will choose to make them available for purchase. I bought their forge and though I haven't used it much (and know even less about forging) it seems quite capable. It would be nice to have a Canadian option for forge burners for those of us north of the border who would like to make their own forge but don't wish to fiddle with burners. I would encourage anyone interested to check them out so they might make them available. This is not intended as an advertisement and I have no affiliation with this shop. I know I looked a while myself for a burner option in Canada before I just bought my forge. http://edmontonblacksmithshop.com/blacksmithing-tools-and-equipment
  4. Hello, I've made some progress in building my first propane fired forge. The forge body is 8" id (before insulation) and a length of 12" Lined it with 2 layers of 1" 8lb density Kaowool, followed with some Rigidizer and about 3/8" of Satanite. Installed on the forge floor is a 1" hard fire brick. Burner is a 3/4" running around 5-6psi. I used some soft firebrick as a temporary doors at each end. I couldn't wait to fire it up! I am in the process of building a proper stand for it.
  5. I bought a bran new propane torch for 30 bucks. It will be for my gas forge, once I can figure out why it won't stay lit! The torch is hooked up to a PSI regulator, 0-20 PSI. Here is the regulator : https://www.amazon.com/GASPRO-Pressure-Propane-Adjustable-Regulator/dp/B01M4SA4PG/ref=sr_1_16?ie=UTF8&qid=1487707210&sr=8-16&keywords=psi+regulator I turn the psi all the way up and light the torch, and it instantly dies. After fooling around, I figured out that covering the air holes on the burner keeps the flame alive, but burns very slowly, obviously.. The moment I move my hand off of the air holes, the flame goes out. What is going on here?! Pictures of the torch :
  6. Well I had everything set up to build this forge and then got side tracked with a forge off of e-bay that was only a few miles away, it ended up blowing out, Link below. and I decided that I would finish the project I had started and one day possibly salvage the other one to have a monster forge!! But for now this little guy is all I really need. So sit back and enjoy some pictures and I'll take you through what I have done so far. Please feel free to offer guidance as this is the first forge I have built. I've just been going off of this page and learning as I go! Step 1, get a shell, I scored this old air tank at St. Vincent for $3 its the same size as a 5 gal propane tank but it had an extra valve and no fear of blowing up from a spark when I cut into it. WIN WIN! I took some 1" square tube and welded it on as feet so Harrison Forge could stand on his own, these will be visible when we move down and he gets flipped over. For my first layer of insulation I used 8# 1" thick 2700 degree Inswool HTZ from HighTempTools. It's doubled up in this photo. I used a K28 kiln brick for a floor. Side note. I layed down a layer of kast-o-lite under the brick to give it a flat surface under it, you can kind of see it on the left side of the brick here. And a packed in a bunch more Inswool, I used 2x 1" pieces, and packed the scraps in around the front and back of the brick.The back side, which I think will become the front because I like the big open hole... Giggity. I had some K24 kiln bricks that I was just going to stack as the doors but then decided to take a little extra time and weld up some brackets to hold them while I had everything out and was in fab-mode. Door's being measured out. I wanted them to stay on the bracket when full open. A top bracket will be added for extra stability later. Now to get my supports measured with my super high tech method of "Calibrated Eye" and prep them for welding on the belt grinder. Now it's time to set them up and weld them in place on the forge. Weld area preped! I measured where the brick would be centered for the door then using a level and soap stone etched a line to guide my holder placement. I did the same on the other side, in the effort to save picture over load it is not shown, but looks remarkably similar. Getting everything lined up. Once in place a quick tack weld to hold it until the other side can also be put in place. With one side tack welded, I moved on to the other and made sure it was all squared away using the first one as a reference point. Now with both support arms in place I can measure exactly where I want my brick holder to be. It's hard to tell in this pic but there is about 1/8" gap between the brick and the front of the forge. I wanted a good enough cap so that when I added the kast-o-lite the brick would still be able to move freely. With the door all tack welded and everything still square I finished up the welds on all fronts. Now time for some Kast-o-lite!! I didn't get any pictures of the mixing with this becuase it ended up being a lot faster than I thought it would. I don't remember if I read it here or saw it on youtube but it stuck with me that someone said you only have 15 minutes once you mix it to get it how you want it before you're times up. They weren't kidding, I'd say 10 is probably closer to it. But it was super easy just mix with water and it feels like that stuff from Nickelodeon Kids, Squand maybe? Anyways I only had a 5# bag from HighTempTools and it ended up being plenty for this little guy. And I have some left over that will probably go to patching up my farriers forge. All in all it's about 1/2"-3/4" thick, I went back and stuffed it around where the bunner lets in just to make sure there was NO unprotected Inswool. I started building this forge because my antique NC tool Farrier forge wasn't able to get up to welding temp and I wanted something with just a little bit more room for stock. But I have read on here many times about how hard flux is on your floor and I knew I wanted a floor I could take out and throw away when it got to laden with flux and such. So I took a K28 Kiln brick and cut it into 3rds (Using the calibrated eye again!) One of those I then cut in half to make up for the total length of my floor. I like this as 1 brick yields 2 full forge floors. And for about $5 a brick is only $2.50 for a new floor. Small price to pay for the sweet satisfaction of a weld well done! With these I can just set them in the forge and when they get ruined swap them out, very quick and easy. Right now my Kast-o-lite is setting up, and I am waiting until tomorrow to do my burn in to let it have a full 24 hour cure time. I know Frosty The Lucky talked about replacements for ITC-100 that were a little more affordable, so I am still looking into what I will coat the inside of the kast-o-lite in. As far as burner I cheated ad also got one from a blacksmith school in seattle. I originally planed on making my own but by the tie I got everything to build it i was around $30 plus time and effort. And a ready to go 150K BTU burner was only $50 so I said "To the Birds!" and just bought one. Big thanks to everyone who contributes on this group, I love learning form everyone here. -Coyote
  7. I recently finished putting together a new furnace made from an old keg. The top and bottom are solid 2700F refractory and the walls are 2" kaowool with a refractory shell. My burner is this Venturi. I took the furnace up to my brother-in-law's farm to do its first firing for curing and ran into a problem that I hope someone can help me with; you may be able to hear me mentioning in the videos, but for clarity the furnace runs great while I have the lid off but when I put it on the flame chokes out, spraying nothing but propane. I have to dial my PSI down extremely low in order to sustain a flame inside with the lid on and it isn't a sufficient heat source to get me to melting temp in any sort of practical time frame. I expect that the answer is simply to continue to fiddle with it further until I have it dialed in, but are there any obvious issues? This is something I would ask about over at Alloy Avenue, but I still haven't been approved for an account; their registration process is peculiar.
  8. hello everyone , at first this is my first time posting here and i am from the netherlands so my english wont be perfect . i watched a video about making a propane burner for my selfmade foundry ( so i finished the build but it does not work like the one in the video here are some photos's and a video of my burner .: so as you can see the torch does not burn right and it burns inside the supply tube aswell.. i am out of ideas what it can be please help video-1477765585.mp4
  9. So here is what happened: I have recently bought a $130 Devil Forge (I got this one). Now after I ordered it, I realized that this doesn't have a connection kit( no hose, regulator, valve) and I need one. What I was thinking do can do is get a regulator, a hose, and a gasket. Clamp the hose onto the burner using the gasket, then connect the hose to the regulator, regulator to the tank. Since these guys are from Europe it's kinda hard to contact them. So would my idea work? If not, what world work and where can I buy it? Welding supply, propane store? I need to know what will work and where to get what I need to connect the burner to the tank.
  10. Hi guys I have recently bought a forge: http://m.ebay.com/itm/252086987885?_mwBanner=1 it doesn't come with a connection kit, which is why I am here. Is there any thing I can buy in the US that will serve as a connector kit, connecting the propane to the regulator, then the hose? Do I have to cut off the top of say a barbecue hose and connect it to the burner with a air tight clamp? I need help because I am so urgent to start working. Thanks! PS links on what to buy is WELL appreciated.
  11. Started working on my forge's twin burners this week. So far, everything is turning out great. I have not tested this design yet, but plan to do so soon. I started off by taking a close look at my TurboTorch tips that I use at work (Acetylene gas). Here's a picture of the TurboTorch tip (A11). I too extra notes on the brass section of the torch tip, where the gas begins to mix with air. The gas flows from the regulator into a small chamber, with a very tiny hole machined in it. This little hole sits just before the air intake, which is proportional to the overall diameter of the tip size. I know this because other air intake holes on smaller and larger TurboTorch tips that I have increase and decrease based on tip size (A5 vs A11 for example). Here's a picture of the air-intake holes. Here's a somewhat poor picture of the little hole inside the tip I'm talking about. Anyways, I started considering how I could make this into a larger burner with propane gas for my forge. After learning a bit about forge burners form various sources (mostly the black hole of the Internet where I lost most of my soul), I took a trip to the hardware store (Ferguson Plumbing Supply where I do most of my day-to-day business for work). I purchased a few 1/4 brass fittings, including a 1/4 to 3/8 90. I took the small 1/4 brass cap which I purchased (hex) and drilled a 1/16th hole dead center in the cap. I took a 12" black nipple (also purchased from Ferguson) and cut off the threads. I then proceeded to drill a lot (like, swiss cheese-lot) into the top of the nipple about 3" down. I tapped some set-screws into the side of the gas pipe to hold my reducing 90 (still to be determined if this is the best way to center the fuel hole in the burner). I slid a small piece of stainless steel pipe (one which fit nearly perfectly over the 3/4 gas nipple) up the pipe and used a screw to set it in place (to control air flow for tuning). This covered some of the holes that I drilled earlier on. Finally, I choose to use a small piece of stainless steel pipe which was flared out at the bottom of my burner. I connected it to the 3/4 gas nipple via a set screw as well. The 1/16 hole in the hex cap as seen through the mostly-completed burner. The first burner, and the soon-to-be burner. I need to test the first one before I make the second. Ok. Tell me what you think. People - I'm not looking for drama. The last few posts I've made here have been met with some ornery little kid crap. If you don't like the way I write, move on people. There's at least a few thousand personalities on this forum. You won't get along with everybody. Moving on, away from the drama, I would like some honest opinions. I've never built a forge or burner before. ________________________________________________________ That's it. Let me know how I'm doing. Be joyful. Be friendly. Live life to it's fullest, and have no regrets. I forgot to take a close up picture of the little holes I drilled in the 3/4" nipple. They are as evenly spaced as I could get them with no drill press (soon I'll have one of those too). Again, I modeled the air-intake after the holes on the turbo torch. This post has been heavily edited by Claytonzeimet. Quotes below were made before the edits.
  12. I've officially started building my first gas forge. Honestly, I've never done something like this. Most of what I know about smithing comes from the black hole known as the Internet. So, I'm reaching out. I'm starting a thread to get input from the community as I run into problems. Here's what I got so far: It's a propane tank with a big hole cut into the top. I made the hole approximately 8" in diameter. I did this to make it easier to insulate the thing, and light it up later on. Notice, I've sanded all the paint and little rust down to bare metal. I plan to use high heat primer and paint on it later on. Please note - the 8" hole is not the forge opening. I plan to mount a hinge somewhere on the top of the forge, and connect a 8" saw blade to it. The saw blade will have a single layer of 1" Kaowool, and 1/4" of Satanite on it. The center of the saw blade will have a 3.5" hole in the center to allow forge gasses to vent out proportionately. The inside of the forge will be lined with 2" of kaowool, and 1/4" to 1/2" of Satanite (whatever feels right when I'm putting it on). I'll also have a sacrificial firebrick floor which will be replaced when needed. I haven't finished building my burners yet, but they are coming. They will be two 300,000 BTU 3/4" propane jet burners with machined orifices (not torch tips). My math says that this thing should be able to get to forge welding heat with little to no problem. I'll also have a small door in the back (hinged on/ stainless) which will only open when an object is passed through it. Questions I have for the community: I'm still not sure where the burner placement should be. Should I go directly on top? I understand some people put the burners at 15 degrees off dead center to provide a swirl of some sort. What is this swirl? Can someone take a photo of it for me so I can better understand what I'm actually trying to accomplish? How do I attach the burners to the forge? I don't have a welder. I'm thinking some short black pipe nipples and corresponding nuts? Just not sure. I'm sure I'm going to come up with lots of more questions in the future. I'll ask on this thread as stuff comes up. Thanks for the help!
  13. Is it safe to cut into a brand new empty propane tank to make a foundry? It was bought without ever being filled, so am I guaranteed I won't blow up or should I still remove the valve?
  14. Im building a gas fuel/refractory forge in class and i wanted some advice on how much gas/in^3 i need... specifics: 15"x27" 30 gallon drum, insulated 3.5" to form an 8" chamber volumes: drum--4771.17 cu.in. chamber--1181.35 cu.in. the refractory takes up 3590.05 cu.in. and i plan to have an insulated half-lid... how much gas/air do i need in the chamber?
  15. Ok, so me and my parter have made a few knives and are happy with our results so we think we're ready to move onto forge welding and making some demascus. I've got a pretty simple design in my head. I have an old propane tank I can cut the bottom and top out of. Going to cut a hole it, shove a weed burner in it ,fill it with a firebrick/ refractory cement mixture up to the lip and coat the outside with kaowool. I don't like doing things twice so I'd like to do it right and I've heard that most fluxes can tear through basically anything pretty quickly so I've done some research on materials I can line the inside with to protect it. Mostly what I've heard is there's nothing to do accept touch up the cement periodically, but I recently ran into a product from a company called homesaver that's used to line fireplaces. It's called "Flue goo" and I've heard a few smiths say it's suppose to be very resistant to flux. It's about $30 a gallon so I'd like to know if anyone has any experience with it and if so is it worth it? If not is there any other products you suggest that would protect the inside of my forge?
  16. i am about build a propane froge first one . my question is can i use the regulator off of a acetaline bottle set up or do i have to have the adustable one from a propane supply house i. i can get a regulator from harbor frieght for 35 and a hose for 15
  17. I've been using Michael Porter's Gas Burners for Forges, Furnaces, and Kilns as plans to build my gas forge and burner. The plans recommend I use a Tweco .030 or .035 inch MIG welding contact tip, 1-1/2-inch long. I have no experience with these parts, and have no idea what the importance is of the length, the taper, etc, and I've been unable to find this part anywhere. The drawings in my plans show a tapered MIG tip (shown in attachment), but I've had difficulty finding anyone who carries any contact tips with tapers. Most parts I've been able to find have a rounded end. Does the overall length of the MIG tip, the inside diameter, and the taper on the end affect performance? If not, I'll just buy one that I can find readily, and not have to go searching for this exact piece.
  18. Hey there. I am absolutely crash-coursing into forge making and metal working. I've gone through several crude forge designs and worked up to my current concept, that is a bit ambitious. I am having an absolutely ridiculous time getting by burners working properly. I am going to attach pictures to show what I have going on. Basically I have a 36" can lined with fire brick and refractory cement, that part holds heat so well! Then I use a 20# tank, low pressure regulator off of one of those tank-top heating burners, 3/8 OD hard copper lines, going to .35 MIG tips for burners. I have tried anywhere from 1 to 6 burners, different amounts of air holes in the 'venturi' area. So many things. Last night, with this setup I had two burners spaced about 5" apart working quite well. Finally all blue flames. But it's very temperamental and seems to end up choking itself out. When they work, they work well - but it's only in tiny spurts of good fortune. They definitely seemed to be running way too lean, and I increased the venturi holes by 400% and that is what really set it running better than ever. The second burner from the entrance chokes back too much though, and basically was only heating steel red-hot under directly under the first one. Running only one burner seems to just be too much gas. Two works the best. Should I have a flare on the end of the tubes? I've seen mixed things about this. Do I need to open up the back end of the forge... with more than 2 burners, and even with two sometimes there is excess fuel going into the chamber, and will sometimes choke out the flame. My main concerns at this point are should I have flares on the ends, and is it reasonable to think I need to knock a brick out of the 'back' wall to keep back pressure from building up in the chamber. Please help! I've wasted hundreds of $ already on parts through my trouble shooting and I'm admitting defeat. This is just way too complex to simply teach myself like many things I've done.
  19. Hi All, After trawling through many a post on these forums, I came to the conclusion that what I would like to know may be so deep, that I may not find it. Hence, my first post. A little background on the forge I created. Much of which, I took from these forums. It is made from 10mm thick steel pipe, 10" I.D. I used a refractory glue to adhere the 1400oC fibre blanket to the inside of the pipe, and a second layer of insulation bonded to the first. Following this, I washed the blanket with Kaowool hardener (I used quite a bit to get some strength into the blanket), and once it was fully dried, I applied a Blakite (http://www.morganthermalceramics.com/sites/default/files/datasheets/1_jm2600blakiteblakitevjm3300.pdf) wash over this, and gradually built up the thickness, layer by layer once each previous one had dried. I left the final coat to dry for a good few weeks (in Aus weather at that). I have some ITC-100 analogue material to wash over the top of that, but, as it always seems to happen... I fired up the forge prior to applying it, to get an idea of the improvement in heating times once I actually did apply it. After the first firing, I noticed some cracking in my blakite layer, very straight, running perpendicular to the curvature of the blanket. Second firing, it has worsened. Not significantly, but nonetheless, I want to reduce/eliminate it. My question for anyone with the knowledge (I know some of you will have the knowledge), is firstly, how should I address the cracking in this current forge? What material and how should I apply it, to eliminate it? I am always wary of those nasty fibre blanket fibres, and want to reduce the possibility of them being airborne as much as possible. (I know that the hardener should have done that, but I tend to be over careful when my lungs are concerned) Also, this current forge heats well even without the ITC-100 equivalent, admittedly. However, I believe it is likely on the higher volume side of a 3/4" T-Rex burner, at ~500 cubic In. for forge welding (I haven't cranked the PSI above 10 yet, mostly running at about 5, with an idle circuit dropping to who knows what -> pressure gauge post idle needed). As such, I will be gathering some more pipe and likely be making a smaller volume forge, at about 300 cubic In. (designed in Sketchup). Given this, can anyone suggest / help me out with a similar layering to that which I did previously, with tips to eliminate the cracking etc? I can follow up with pictures if necessary. Thank you, D.
  20. Hey there guys, long time lurker but I have a question that I am hoping someone can help me with. i am trying to learn to forge weld and am having tons of difficulty. I think i have come to the conclusion that it infact is my forge not getting hot enough. Here is my set up. cofee can forge fired with a 3/4 inch reil style butner. Orafice is drilled to 1/16th (smallest i could find), ran at 5-10psi. Burner is then helped with ~25psi of air from the back to aid in compustion. I get good heat for forging and shaping but not near enough to weld. Looking at ways to increase the heat output. Im using straight propane not mapp. the borax does melt when its put on something that clmes directly from the forge.
  21. Ladies and gents - I am building a gas forge this winter. Planning to use Michael Porter's basic propane cylinder design. Because it is already piped to my property, I would like to use natural gas. This would eliminate the need for bottles, and for keeping them changed. Is it possible to use natural gas instead of propane with a simple, naturally aspirated forge? Are there any cons to doing so? Do you know of any guides or FAQs about doing so? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
  22. Hello folks, this is my first post on here. To give you a quick background: I don't have much internet access (phone only for now) so excuse me if I've missed other threads with similar specifications. Up to now I've only worked with coal forges, but due to my recent move, it won't be possible to run coal SO I've decided to build a gas forge. I've seen tons of options on here concerning size, shape, and number of burners. Now I don't know exactly what info you need to answer my questions, but I work with mostly round and square stock from 1/2" to 1", and do lots of scroll bending and twisting. With my current forge I am working with up to 12" of material at a time with multiple pieces in the fire because sometimes I have more than one person working in the shop. Here is my plan so far: I have a surplus of 8"x8"x10" refractory blocks. I will be cutting them in half to use as my lining. I also plan to build frosty's T burner plan as the burner(s). My questions are A) how many burners should I run and B ) how big should I build the forge? Thanks in in advance for any input.
  23. I am working of a double burner for my forge (yet to be built), and need some help with the design. I was breaking my head over where to start, when it occurred to me: why not use the burner system from an old barbecue? As you can see, the only modification I have done is to slide a metal tube over the orifices of the BBQ part, drilled in some air intake holes, and flared the end a very little bit. While it burns nicely, I think there is too much orange/yellow on the flame... i.e. inefficient combustion? What should I change to get a better flame? Thicker tube? Bigger flare? More air (I think that won't work as it already has so much air that the flame occasionally "moves" as much as an inch away from the end of the pipe...) ? Any tips/advice appreciated! John P.S. First picture is of minimum flame, second of maximum.
  24. Hello, I built a simple paint can forge and ordered a burner online (picture attached), and tried it outside of the forge last night. The flame mostly comes out of the air holes on the side of the burner. No matter what we tried, the same would be true. We tried adjusting the collar to cover more/less of the air holes, adjusting the propane rate on both the regulator and the tank, and even the position of the burner. Nothing seemed to work. We then put it in the actual forge and turned it on. It worked correctly once but was in the wrong position, so we raised it up. Upon doing so, it never worked properly again. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
  25. Hi, im a beginner blacksmith, and i wanted to know if it was possible to use a simple 1lb torch head with a hose directly in a 20lb propane tank to heat up a small homemade paint container forge. If not, wich torch and or material should i get to heat it up to the right temperature. Keep in mind that i am a student with really low budget. Torch that i have : http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31cgyK4N--L._SX466_.jpg Hose that i will get : http://www.devardiglass.com/hose.JPG Sorry if i made grammar mistake, im french.