Ohio

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About Ohio

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    Monroe, WA

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  1. I don't think they're open on the weekends, but If you're willing to come north (I'm outside Monroe), you can visit the amazing Whiteside Steel, 17706 State Route 9 SE, Snohomish, WA 98296.
  2. Ohio

    Book recommendation

    Thanks, Irondragon. I've got it.
  3. Ohio

    Book recommendation

    I have credentials at NARA, work with archivists at LOC, have done research at state archives, have contacts within specialty and local history groups here and around the country. I've also handled digitization projects of oral histories, print, and photographic holdings for various archives and libraries in this area, so I have a pretty good grip on what sources are available and I've been through most of them. I also have a neighbor who started blacksmithing with his stepfather when he was seven or eight who keeps giving me blacksmithing equipment (I still need to go get the swage block he gave me) whose been generous with his knowledge. Thanks again everyone for the book recommendations.
  4. Ohio

    Book recommendation

    True that +10. Actual experience is of interest to me often there's a backstory that can be really revealing. For example, I'd like to know what people got paid for certain kinds of work, how many hours, how'd they rip off or get ripped off, what was the price of bread and shoes, stuff like that. I was just reading an article by someone advocating going to a piecework rather than hourly wage system for blacksmiths in industrial shops (I can make a pretty good guess why he's advocating that position, but anyhoo...). I don't repro that article in fiction, but it can be part of a character's world view, or to help show how a character believes one thing and says another because his job depends on it, which puts him in conflict and conflict is interesting---stuff like that. It allows nuance grounded in real experience. That soft-focus B.S. doesn't interest me much. I have other characters working at other jobs and some of them are just excruciatingly dangerous while being dull. Most jobs are dull and most jobs are filled with drudgery. I don't run away from the drudgery in my writing. In real life, I run away from drudgery like I'm on fire, which, at the forge, has happened only once. It wasn't a very big fire, so it hardly counts.
  5. Ohio

    Book recommendation

    I write pretentious literary fiction, Frost. And no galleys, not on this project. Mostly I was looking for research material that will help me with existing characters. I've had four books published, three novels and a textbook on filmmaking, and I'm pretty comfortable with more challenging narrative forms, which this project has. Think something like Rashomon but then take the characters back 6 years to understand the choices they made to get to this one specific place and time, and then get all William Faulkner on it. Toldya, pretentious literary fiction. I got xxxxxxxxxxx references from folks here and have already started reading selections. And TP suckered me into the Sears catalog, so I just paged through two of them on archive.org---dang it, I had stuff to do today---and now my eyes hurt from the teeny tiny type. Can you imagine typesetting all that? Yowza. Is this referring about a load of Manure ? use a different phrase next time
  6. Ohio

    Book recommendation

    I'll have to ponder on the location part as this character moves around quite a bit. I'm fairly familiar with the change from man power to steam power to electricity, esp. out here, and have a collection of articles about on-the-job accidents that are pretty gruesome many of which involved new power sources that someone didn't quite understand. I'll look up some more about acetylene. That's interesting and would apply to lots of industries. I'm pretty focused on 1910-1917---I just asked about a wider swath of time because this character isn't just starting out, so I need to ground him in smithing knowledge. I just downloaded a load of AMERICAN BLACKSMITH volumes for a bit of help. And I'm starting to love the Sears catalog idea. A lot. Maybe too much.
  7. Ohio

    Book recommendation

    Excellent. Thanks, TP, Al, and JHCC. Here's the dealio---I have a character (yeah, okay, I write books, don't make fun of me) who is a blacksmith during the later end of the time period. As part of the narrative arc, I'd like to convey what his day-to-day job is. Characters often live and breathe in the gap between getting it right and getting it wrong. This character is one of a cast of thousands and I want to explore the hands-on aspect of the actual work across a variety of jobs, trades, and crafts for pretty much all of them. This is a multi-year, multi-volume project with fiction and nonfiction sides that only an insane person would attempt, but I've always thought sanity was overrated. Seriously, this is a crazy effort but we all have our obsessions and I won't make fun of yours if you don't make fun of mine. Scratch that---I will totally make fun of you. Like, totally. Anyhow, I really appreciate the help. Now I need to go outside and make some hooks for holding material. Imagine that---I can actually make the hooks I need because I can blacksmith. That is awesome.
  8. Ohio

    First forge

    CRS, I have yet to run across a post of yours where I didn't understand what you were trying to communicate, a real mark of brain power. And like a lot of people, it was your JABOD effort that inspired me to jump in to the craft. Lupercal, Charles's JABOD efforts really are worth following. He combines deep knowledge of smithing with down-and-dirty (literal) tips so you end up not just hitting up metal and moving it with a hammer (which is amazing) but grasping the basic principles of forge design. A generous gift from that fellow---the typos are just a fringe benefit.
  9. Ohio

    First forge

    Ok, was I the only one who giggled when I read this? That gosh darn new dangled fuel. If only it was "new dangled fool." That would've been perfect. Lupercal, seriously, Charles's JABOD III is a great place to start because it's cheap and it totally works. Build one and you'll find out quickly whether blacksmithing is for you.
  10. Ohio

    Book recommendation

    I'm looking for a book or articles about historical blacksmithing in the U.S. circa 1900-1920. Specifically, how blacksmithing was changing with the onset of other industrial processes. I'd be particularly interested in what happens to general smithies in small and medium-sized towns during the period, but even an overview would be helpful. I'm not afraid of challenging textbooks and academic papers. Come on, ThomasPowers. I bet you can think of something.
  11. BryanL, this looks really good. I think, though, that since you're leaving in a few months for work, you should send this to me to keep for you. I won't even charge you rent. I am offering this out of the kindness of my heart as I am all about generosity and not merely covetous. Srsly, thanks for sharing the pix. It's fun to see your progress.
  12. Ohio

    sculpture or trash?

    Frosty, dude, you're so literal. I was going for the idea of the poem, not the sculpture---how you look at something you think will last forever and how...not so much. So, MotoMike, whatcha think? Know what you're going to do with it?
  13. Ohio

    sculpture or trash?

    I'm with Das. That's neat. You could always write up what you have here to give it a provenance and tuck it away somewhere, maybe in a waterproof container kept near wherever you put it or engraved, mounted, and set nearby. Or not. Is anyone else reminded of the Shelley poem, "Ozymandias?" (This moment of artsy pretentiousness brought to you by six of the seven liberal arts.)
  14. I don't care what anyone says, JHCC, I think you're funny. MotoMike, there are responses above from several people regarding baja's original question, including concerns about the approach---trying to get the MIG gun into the space, how to deal with the s7 warping, etc. BigGun and Frosty also suggested a different approach using brazing that really seems do-able. A quick review of the thread gives details on both the OP and this other approach. Frosty, I use my mini-lathe with stick tools. I know a lot of people who use Powermatic wood lathes for spinning, but if I get a dedicate spinning lathe, 24" with scissor tools would be my absolute maximum.
  15. Not a huge swing. Probably no more than 24", probably less. I do manual spinning now---I made some of tools (including the t-rest and wooden mandrels) and bought and handled some others. Not scissor tools, yet. You showed me some pix of your dad's spinning work, especially one bowl he spun on air using two different metals that is amazing.