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Pig tail toasting fork


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#21 saintjohnbarleycorn

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 09:37 AM

they look great frosty, time, what are you gonna do?
I worked in a plating place, can't remember the exact juice they used, but I remember that arsenic was very common. We did copper, zinc, chrome, in that order, with hydrochloric for rust, and ammonia to strip copper.

#22 Frosty

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 02:19 PM

Plating is a whole different thing even if the mechanics are similar. Disposal of the hazmat residue is a MAJOR concern not to mention being able to breath safely in your neighborhood.

Do NOT use hydrochloric to descale or passivate Stainless, it can make things WAY worse all round.

I have a little scrap left over from the forks and while I'm loading for the Demo tomorrow I'll see how vinegar works. I've been told virtually any acid not containing chlorine will work including cool aid.

I'll let you know what I find out.

Frosty

Be yourself. Everybody else is taken.

"unknown"


#23 Junksmith

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 03:12 PM

Junksmith, not to poke you , but isn't electrolyte hydrochoric acid and water (distilled water) or do you use a different solution for electroplating? I keep thinking I want to get into etching and stuff, I just have no good place to store or dispose of acid....


I wish I knew for sure. That's the problem with remembering high school physics. It was 20 years ago and I wasn't taking notes:o

I get inspired by these ideas sometimes and just start spitting out more ideas. Once I settle down and start thinking things out I usually find that whatever I was thinking of was either unworkable or way too much trouble! Still, I do get some good ideas that way now and again so I keep it up. Any way you slice it, the poke was well deserved:D

Edited by Junksmith, 26 June 2009 - 03:13 PM.
clarification

Joe Scheerer
The Moonshine Forge
Alcohol-Fueled Blacksmithing

#24 Pault17

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 03:23 PM

Thanks for that last bit Frosty. I was wondering about the vinegar route. I would just make a bunch and put 'em in a gallon or two of vinegar, and let them sit for a week. The run 'em on a wire wheel. I did that on mild and it came out looking like stainless.

carpe malleus, lorem eget

pax,
paul

 

In reality, there are only four basic treatments a blacksmith can make to iron; Drawing, upsetting, bending and twisting. When one has truly mastered these four treatments, one may consider one's self a blacksmith. - arftist


#25 Frosty

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 06:57 PM

My pleasure Paul. Baking soda will work on mild steel scale if you're going the electrolysis route.

Soaking in vinegar works fine as well, even better yet if you quench in vinegar, sometimes the scale just jumps off.

Cleaning up the SS was an experience.

Frosty

Be yourself. Everybody else is taken.

"unknown"


#26 HerrBrun

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 09:22 PM

Hi Frosty, very nice forks and an exelant idea! Have you considered finishing with sand paper to highlight the high spts and leaving the valleys dark. I did that to some stainless implements I made over 25 years ago and they still look good today, at least in my veiw.

#27 Frosty

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 12:06 AM

That is a good idea, I like it.

I didn't want to leave scale on these so they wouldn't trap old grease, etc. I don't know these folks and didn't want to take any chances.

However once descaled and brushed a heat or ferric chloride patina with sanded highlights would be easy. I'll have to give it a try on some of the scraps.

Thanks.

Frosty

Be yourself. Everybody else is taken.

"unknown"


#28 fat pete

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 09:28 AM

i wonder how they would do in a tempr oven...not wrapped .... i tried that after seeing it on a nother forum and leaves a neat finish that you lightly sand the highlights....leaving the insideo fthe twist or file mark stays black...and the edges are shiny....

#29 AdrianWood

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 01:08 AM

very nice fork,stainless as well!! a real sturdy bit of equipment. bet you could get a great chunk of meat on that fella.

#30 Holzkohle

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 07:32 PM

Frosty. What I have read and use for rust removal with electrolysis is to use washing soda, not baking soda. Does baking soda work better for scale, and would it also work with rust removal?

Jerry

#31 Frosty

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 08:58 PM

I thought washing soda is the same as baking soda. Almost any electrolyte should work.

Thanks Adrian, I'll have to ask the newlywed couple how much meat they put on them. Deb wants a pair of course I'm just hoping I can get the power to the power hammer before I have to make more. They were a LOT of work.

Frosty

Be yourself. Everybody else is taken.

"unknown"


#32 meinhoutexas

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Posted 02 July 2009 - 07:08 PM

frosty way cool! will have to try that one out !
Hot steel refreshes the soul




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