MADWORKS

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  • Content Count

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About MADWORKS

  • Rank
    Junior Member

Converted

  • Location
    Northern Vermont USA
  • Biography
    I love iron
  • Interests
    rock climbing, reading, making stuff...
  • Occupation
    what job?;P laid off
  1. Hello, I am thinking of making some throwing knives and I don't know much about them. It seems to me that they would need a different temper, probably softer. Obviously the balance is important but I don't know what a good balance would be. Whats a good thickness weight /length? I'm thinking of using 5160. Let me know what you guys think! Thanks, Marc
  2. Hello! I'm looking to buy this trenton anvil and I want to know more about it. Can anyone help me out? It has the number 177 at the base It measures 25" in length and 10.5" in height. The base is 11.5" by 11.5". It has a 1" square hole and a 5/8" round hole. Is the 177 the weight? How old is it? How much would you buy it for? I live 3 hours from it's location so I'm trying to gather as much info as possible. Thanks!
  3. Thanks everyone for all your responses! I agree or can see where everyone is coming from. I guess like most other things in life you have work hard, be diligent and have a little "right place at the right time" luck for this to become a reality. Unless one of the few smiths in my area take a liking to me I think I'm destined to learn from books and the internet until a day when I can afford schooling. I would add or repeat that actively practicing and seaking metalworking jobs and experience is the best way to catch a "masters" eye because the more you know and the more interest (time devoted) you have the more likely you are to become and "apprentice" or at least be showed new techniques. Thanks again! Marc
  4. Hi everyone! I'm sure all of us at one point has wanted to be apprenticed by a master blacksmith or bladesmith at some point in our metal working years. These days I see many schools where one can spend lots of money for a weekend of cramming techniques and little experience. Where did the apprenticeships go? I seen a few where its father to son or some other family relationship but other then that... I am interested to hear from smiths who are at the point where they can teach, to see where they stand, and why it is so difficult to find one willing to trade knowledge for work. Is it no longer feasible because of time and money? Are there smiths out there who would love to apprentice someone but they just can't find a suitable candidate? Are there in fact apprentices out there right now learning from experts to carry on the trade? Cheers to all! Marc
  5. Thank you all! I think my main problem has been placing my work too low in the fire. Cheers!
  6. Hi everyone, I hope you're all well. I am wondering if there are any tricks to reducing scale in a coal forge. I realize this has most likely been posted before but I can't seem to find anything on the subject. I am all ears to suggestions or links to previous posts. Thanks! Marc
  7. I'm a little confused as to what people are saying about raising and dishing. Now Justin said he dishes his metal FROM 12 gauge TO 14 gauge effectively thinning it, just the way dishing it should. Then Jmercier corrects Justin saying: "I think you mean raising instead of dishing, dishing is stretching metal out into a dished form, which thins the metal, raising however is pushing the metal around, and will cause metal to remain the same thickness at the center and to thicken at the edges." Since this comment the thread has assumed that the metal is being raised and not dished... So my question is to Justin. Are we actually talking about raising or dishing here? In my experience many pieces of armor require both hot and cold work for example an articulated elbow may have 4 lames and a cop. The lames can be cold dished as they require little work but the cop will probably have to be annealed once if you dish it or worked hot if you want a nice raised point. A great example of this is Eric Dube's work. He does all sorts of later period armor and he uses both hot and cold work to finish his harnesses. Here are two videos of his one showing hot work and one showing cold work. YouTube - Fabrication d'armure médiévale Making of medieval armor #4 VS YouTube - Fabrication d'armure médiévale Making of medieval armor #13 Hope this helps! Marc
  8. Thanks everyone! I may have my heart set on the 335# anvil, and interestingly enough that's the only one they have in stock! Yesteryear, that 500# anvil looks HUGE! I can't wait to own a similar beauty. Thanks again for all the responses and warm welcome. I have gathered most of the tools I need to get going, I just want a heavier anvil. I actually found a guy who had a champion No. 400 blower for $100 and when I went to pick it up he had a post vise leaning in a corner of his shop. He offered to sell it to me for $50... Needless to say this guy made my week! I recently bought an anvil that looks like a vulcan but it doesn't have ANY markings of any kind. It weighs around 110#. I knew that it was in bad shape but I also knew that it was better than an ASO and that It was for an ok price. I paid $120. The bearing test gets around %50 rebound on most of the face though it's not square. It got me started and that's all I wanted from it, but now that I can afford a larger one... I will post pics of these mentioned tools soon! Marc
  9. Hi there everyone! This is my first post. I have been lurking for a little while but not too long... Anyway I just put together a small brake drum coal forge and am about to purchase an anvil. Due to costs and money constraints I am considering the euroanvil variety... Does anyone use a euroanvil? Please give me as much information as you can on them! Do they crack or chip more easily? Is the temper even? How is the finish? How is the design and general shape and layout? I'm a little skeptical about them since they are cheaper then most, but then I would like to have the heaviest anvil I can afford. I would also love to hear about Kohlswa Anvils I heard that they are of comparable prices, but are they of similar quality as well? It's been a pleasure to read all these wonderful and generally educational posts! Thanks, Marc