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Found 14 results

  1. Guns 71

    Powdered Damascus questions

    I just got some powdered 1084 and some powdered nickel in and am going to try a canister. I’ve got some steel blast shot that I’m going to add the powders to and maybe some bearings or swarf just to try. My question is how much nickel do you guys add to the 1084? It’s not cheap and I don’t want to waste it. My other question is could I make layers of varying steel/nickel combos like those colored sand vases kids make at fairs, and get a similar efffect, or would it all blend together? Thanks
  2. Hi, I'm fairly new to forging and am having issues with my blades rusting alot. It seems like every time I make a knife 1-2 weeks later I will look and see light rust building up on the whole blade... any ideas on how to keep this from happening?
  3. I've looked for hours around the web, and I know this was a stupid error on my part (wrong kind of heat treat on mystery spring steel, too lazy/hurried to test on a few scraps). The crack actually took place about 8 months ago, and I'm considering revisiting the blade. I don't want to weld or braze the crack shut (or at least not until I ensure that it won't propagate) but I had an idea. For glass, you can sometimes stop a crack by drilling a hole at the termination. I was thinking by using a large enough bit, I might catch even the microscopic end of the crack, and then either cut/grind/weld/fill/heat treat it and have a mostly serviceable blade, and if that fails, at least I still have a nice looking shelf knife. Unfortunately, I already made a sheath for it (before heat treat) but I guess I can re-make a similar enough blade to fit if all else fails. has anyone else used this method on a blade? what degree of success if any? Thanks!
  4. thesean75

    Screwdrivers as blade steel

    Hi, I am new here, and only moderately experienced in blade making, and have been curious as to whether you could use screwdrivers to make small carving blades or maybe just very thin ones. I have used them as makeshift hot chisels for decorative forging, with mixed results, I also get used ones for about a few pennies a piece so if it is a usable material I would like to utilize it. Thanks for your time and responses!
  5. RcGenck

    Folding with Copper

    So I am relatively new to blacksmithing, I haven't really been able to do much since I live in a third story apartment and it's winter, but I had this idea I can't get out of my head. What if you could fold copper into a mild steel billet? it would probably require a power hammer since copper melts a such a lower temperature than steel, but I think the result would be quite striking. I guess what I am wondering is if you more skilled blacksmiths think that it would be possible, or worth it to try. And how you would go about it.
  6. Kangarhcuse

    Basics in blade design

    I have just started blacksmithing. Most of my scrap metal is railroad spikes found at flea markets. Normally i trace the spike on paper then set up the curves and design to what I want to forge. I am beginning with simple blade shapes, but then want to move into longer and more distinctive blades. What I haven't researched yet is how flat should one of these blades be and how far can you draw out, some of these scrap pieces. As in my most recent plans i have 5 an ahalf to 6 inches of train spike(as steel left over after handle) can i form a 8 in blade easily? Ps iv only had about 2 ok days of forging , still adjusting my forge and work space.
  7. Asma

    Star Saw

    Made blade into stars cause why not....
  8. kayakersteve

    Damsacus drop point hunter

    Here is my latest knife - Billet is 174 layers of 1095, 1084 and 15n20 - I also sandwiched 4 layers of 15n20 for the center. The billet has a raindrop pattern. Scales are oak with brass pins.
  9. I just wanted to share the pics of my homemade adobe lined charcoal forge. I had a wild hair last fall, so put it together then, after becoming disgusted with the cost of propane for my regular dual burner beast. Since I was making one anyway, I could design it to handle longer pieces as I principally forge blades. This unit is handmade, including the hand cranked blower unit. Yes, I just used what was laying around... :D :ph34r: The forge unit is made from an old electric roaster pan, and two steel tv trays which I chopped a side off and set in a 'V' shape and lined with adobe. I know the adobe will crack and flake, but it is easily patched or replaced. No biggie. The tuyere is 1" black pipe, and the air inlet is a 1 1/2" nipple. I designed it so that I can remove the end pipe cap easily for cleaning. Truthfully, if I had to I could line this sucker with ordinary dirt due to my design. Here is my hand cranked blower. As you can see, it is 'V' belt driven with the main drive pulley being an old bicycle rim. I brazed nuts to the rim to attach a handle, and the handle is a bolt covered with loose fitting hard rubber. Believe it or not this unit is all ball bearing construction, as I sunk two bearing races into the wood support for the blower driveshaft. Sitting on the end is a quicky steel reducer cone I made as an adapter from the blower output to the tuyere inlet pipe. I believe the fan itself came from a dryer, but don't quote me on this. I happened to have it on a shelf. The cage is made from an old large popcorn tin I cut down. This unit actually works great, and develops quite a bit of air output for very little cranking effort. I just thought you guys might enjoy this redneck project I threw together.
  10. Recently, my passion for woodworking has been rekindled. I spent a few years building and installing high-end custom cabinetry and shutters several years back, before pursuing my current career as a paramedic. Paramedicine is typically characterized by long, loooooooooong hours (often more than 100 hours/week) and pitifully low wages (most of the "life-savers" who respond to your emergencies make a lower hourly wage less than that of a teenager working at In-n-Out Burger....hence the 100+ hours/week) and so after 8 years I have found myself in dire need of a hobby. While much of my previous experience was done using expensive power tools, I have found myself very interested in the idea of hand crafting wood and even the tools for woodworking. In my research and purchasing of tools, I began to entertain the notion of making my own chisels and plane irons. A premium 2 3/8" wide plane iron made of 3/32" O1 steel is roughly $40 from Hock Tools, whereas 18" of 2.5" wide O1 steel of the same thickness would cost me roughly $28+s/h. Likewise, with good O1 steel chisels running around $70/ea, I could theoretically make four or five for the price of one. Further reading and research led me to a number of ideas and techniques used to make premium hand tools, such as laminating a piece of high-carbon tool steel to mild steel or wrought iron to create a tool with that was able to take and keep a finely honed edge, while still retaining the shock absorbing and impact resistance properties of the milder steel (these were also much easier to sharpen as most of the bevel being hones was made up of the milder steel). I also read that tool steels typically contain 0.8%-1.2% carbon (with the higher quality steels having more carbon) and learned how the grain structure and molecular structures affect how finely and edge may be honed and how well it keeps that edge. I would also note that my father-in-law has been a professional ferrier for about 30 years, and has a small propane forge, anvil, various hammers and tongs, as well as a working understanding of blacksmithing (at least as it relates to shoeing horses). Thus, I have access to basic tools and enough knowledge to hopefully keep me from burning myself too badly-although, if I DO get burnt...well, there's something I HAVE been extensively trained to handle ;-) Now on to my harebrained schemes... 1) Use mild steel repurposed from old horseshoes, and forge weld a 0.03125" thick piece of O1 steel to the back of one side (using perhaps sand or borax as flux?), creating the laminated edge that is highly sought after in quality chisels and plane irons. The stock could then be rough shaped on the anvil, finished with files or grinders, and then heat treated and tempered before honing a final edge. 2) Simply anneal 0.25" thick O1 stock; then shape, heat treat, and temper accordingly. 3) Heat the O1 stock to critical temperature, then air-cool 2-3x before forge welding and/or shaping (I read in one thread that it is a common method of further reducing the grain size of the steel) 4) Use a case hardening method to increase the carbon content of the O1 stock from roughly 0.90% to (hopefully) something closer to 1.2% (I have a video tutorial/lesson by the American Gunsmithing Institute that explains and demonstrates case hardening small parts using a propane torch and carburizing liquid that is brushed onto the steel) Well, these are the ideas I am throwing around in my head. I would greatly appreciate any advise and/or caution from those with more knowledge on the subject. Thank you in advance!
  11. Howdy everyone. I am new to the forums, Just moved to Las Vegas Nevada and have all my own start up forge equipment. Alas I have no place to forge. I`m interested in all forms of smithing traditional, tool, blade, armor, etc. Anyone else in the area that my have a place or setup please contact me. I would love to set something up and meet the locals. Thanks for your time. Jaime D.
  12. Daniel Lea (AKA 99pppo)

    finishing and testing my first self-forged draw knife

    Hey Fellows! Me finishing and testing the first draw knife I forged yet. It is handforged from C60 (AKA 1060) tool steel, water hardened and gradually tempered from the spine. Yet it services me well :-). http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=qVj32un5BG0 Yours - Daniel
  13. Daniel Lea (AKA 99pppo)

    My first pattern welded blade

    Hey Guys, yesterday I forged my first pattern welded billet out of a three layered bar I made previously. Basically just to practice firewelding and the technique of welding Damascus (or pattern welded steel in that case). It is very small and the knife itself is rather just for the decorative pattern and not heat treated or so. I welded the billet out of two layers of mild steel in which I clampwelded a piece of car spring. The holding bar I fixed with a faggot-weld to the billet. I used no welding machines... I forged 364 layers. A video of me welding the last fold you can see here: Here are some pictures (I etched the blade with boiling vinegar): If you have any advice for me for future projects I´d be glad to hear it. If you have a question I´d be glad to answer it. For now - kind regards - Daniel
  14. hobby forger

    chain-saw damsacus

    hello everyone i am wondering what chainsaw damascus would look like and if it would make a good knife from it, if anybody has any pictures or details that might be helpful please and thanks :)