Zeba

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About Zeba

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    South Wales

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  1. I had a thought about practicing certain techniques and hammer methods on soft metals such as aluminium as a way of not using the useful steel for simple practice pieces. Simply using soft metals to mimic hot iron in how it would move as a way to see how to move metal, but because hot steel would react differantly I don’t knkw if this is a very good idea for anything more than basic hammer technique Is this an idea that could work?
  2. Awesome, thank you for the information so I just have to look around to find where is best for what volume of stee I need? and one last question, anybody know where I could get a large block of mild steel to weld a bit of hardened steel onto for an anvil?
  3. I have never had to order anything online without having a simple click system like amazon to use so this is all new to me. I have heard of websites like Furnival steel and argent steel being good suppliers in the UK but I am unsure how to order. Is it as simple as emailing them or is there a certain system of it? I decided to ask here so I can get a basic idea of what to expect first or if there are other better suppliers. I am unable to drive so traveling to a local steel supplier is not an easy task unfortunately.
  4. I was rather hoping I could have it horizontal to make use of more surface area. But I am guessing by having more metal undercmy hammer it becomes more stable and useful right?
  5. Thank you all for this information, I will have my forge right up against the door for ventilation and have a CO monitor about a meter away along with a metal bucket next to it.
  6. I mamaged to get this big lump of metal (no idea what it was) but it is pretty big and heavy so i think it would make a good first anvil but I am not sure how best to clean it up, i was thinking of angle grinding it to a smooth surface and laying on a log with something through the centre hold to fix it in place. I have several pictures including a tape measure for size. Ps could the pointed end be rounded off for a makeshift horn?
  7. Thank you all for the information, I think my first forge will be a simple JABOD forge to get me started without being to complex a build and I will certainly remember to keep the garage doors at all times since that is my only ventilation at the moment.
  8. My main concern is the safety, I have heard that gas forges give off more CO which is a key reason why I am leaning for a coal forge as well as it being simpler to build than a propane forge from what I have seen in my research.
  9. I should have clarified it better, I plan on having it by the door where any harmful fumes would be much less of a worry, the lack of smoke is preferable due to not wanting to have any problems with it blowing across the house or the neighbors house. my initial idea is to have some wheels for easy movement yes and I have looked into coke but it seems more difficult and expensive to get in south wales compared to anthracite.
  10. Now I am aware this has been asked many times and personally I am in favour of a coal forge but before I make my forge I was hoping for opinions from those more experienced. My workshop is an a single car sixed garage next to the house and my only ventilation is having the doors open, I will be making mostly small pieces at first until I develop my skills to where I would feel more comfortable moving metal. since smoke would be an issue without a chimney I would be buying anthracite coal or coke for the fuel, which I know will have a learning curve due to the reputation of anthracite. Given the situation is a coal forge the better and safer choice or should I consider using gas?