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Cleaning up wire rope after forging


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#21 Rich Hale

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 11:25 AM

Teeny a couple of points you may be able to help me with:

if you thouight I meant to completley take a section of cable apart strand by strand then I said it incorrecty Let me try again ,maybe that will help. I weld both ends up  with an electric welder..then with some heat in the piece i untwist quite a ways to spread things  open...then i wire brush. Then with a little heat i twist it back close to how it was at start. A little flux is a good thing when you do this retwist.

And,,,if you have removed all of the oil and grease...how can that then make a difference in the contrast?

My thoughts on the contrast is that since all of the metal in cable that i am aware of is the same metal. there is no contrast. Wot I see for the finished product is there is dark lines at each welded seam. To me that is a line showing decarb. The outer layer of each strand that we cannot keep clean while forge welding.

i have already stated that I am not fond of forge welded cable for my knives..But i have to admit that some of the knves I have seen on this site are really nice pieces..look great.



#22 LDW

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 08:47 PM

I just have to put my two cents worth in. 14 years ago I started welding cable because I wanted to make knives that I thought would be a little different. Someone had told me cable made a good knife. I had some old greasy and rusty cable and burned up probably 6 feet of it till I finally got it to weld. Since then I have literally made hundreds of knives from cable and 95% of them had a wire cable handle. I have never cleaned a piece of cable prior to welding it. In the beginning it does take you a few extra heats therefore you do get extra scale built up and it is harder to forge the knife without breaking the wires. A bead blaster works wonders in the worst cases. In the last 6 or 7 years I have only used a wire wheel on a bench grinder and It cleans them up fine. Years ago I posted these pics  https://Birth of a cable knife

I think it is missing a pic of me opening the cable and fluxing inside the cable then closing it back up prior to forge welding. And when you hammer the shape of the blade start out doing it at a forge welding heat to keep from having any bad places. I am not saying anything that is posted prior is wrong I am simply stating what I have done that works for me. One time at Brians I told someone I could go to the forge and start a fire forge weld a cable knife and and the back of the handle to where the next step would be to start grinding in an hour. I did do this and gave the knife to the person that wanted to see it after I grinded it hardened and tempered and etched it. That knife now lives in Australia. In case the above link did not work. https://plus.google....pwa&gpsrc=pwrd1



#23 teenylittlemetalguy

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 10:31 PM

Teeny a couple of points you may be able to help me with:
if you thouight I meant to completley take a section of cable apart strand by strand then I said it incorrecty Let me try again ,maybe that will help. I weld both ends up  with an electric welder..then with some heat in the piece i untwist quite a ways to spread things  open...then i wire brush. Then with a little heat i twist it back close to how it was at start. A little flux is a good thing when you do this retwist.
And,,,if you have removed all of the oil and grease...how can that then make a difference in the contrast?
My thoughts on the contrast is that since all of the metal in cable that i am aware of is the same metal. there is no contrast. Wot I see for the finished product is there is dark lines at each welded seam. To me that is a line showing decarb. The outer layer of each strand that we cannot keep clean while forge welding.
i have already stated that I am not fond of forge welded cable for my knives..But i have to admit that some of the knves I have seen on this site are really nice pieces..look great.


Glad to hear that the end were stuck together, I have taken them apart when I wanted a smaller bundle and it is a giant pain.
As far as the contrast it honestly seems to me that the pieces with less grease do not have as nice of a contrast. I always assumed that there was carbon in the grease changing the ratio and the color at the weld.
I also think they are inferior metal for a knife compared to other sources, but they work good enough for common uses like I would be involved with.
I'm just looking for one divine hammer. -the Breeders

#24 Frosty

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 01:49 AM

A jewelry maker and Mokume gane maker friend of mine suggested dissolving borax in water and dipping warmed stock to flux deep intricate shapes like cable. By warm he means less than boiling temp, as the stock cools it increases capillarity and draws the flux solution in. When heated to forge the water evaporates leaving every nook and cranny coated in borax. So it foams a little more than normal, it's there where you need it.

 

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#25 Dick L.

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:19 AM

Lyle,

Thanks for posting that link. I remember seeing one of your cable knives in New Hampshire and it was real clean throughout.

 

Dick



#26 Woody

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 05:23 PM

To clean cable prior to forging, wash in solvent several times using fresh solvent each time. let it soak in the solvent for several hours each time. Then when thoroughly dry, put it in an old kettle fill with water and boil the heck out of it. This should remove most of the grease and gunk from the cable. After boiling, remove from the water and let it air dry. The water should evaporate quickly because of the heat.
There is never a good reason to do something stupid!

#27 brucegodlesky

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 06:51 AM

Here is my nickle worth.....

I weld the ends with a mig. Heat and untwist. Heat again several times and beat the snot out of it agains tthe anvil. Most that crud and corruption will come out. Wire brushing all the time. Let it cool. Stick then end of the cable you are going to first weld into a coffee can of kerosene/coal oil. Forget about the borax. Weld that sucker up. You can even use wd40 . Just let the billet cool between heats a little bit so the POL doesn't evaporate from the high heat. 


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