Steve Sells

Intro to Heat Treating

Recommended Posts

On 12/23/2015 at 3:41 PM, GIJosh said:

As for myself, I could have never forged that last set of dragon scale armor of impending sarcasm nor my +5 mithril longsword of unavoidable mockery without doing some homework first.

This just made my day. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I read it and am still a little confused, forgive my stupidity please. Do I temper the knife then harden? I had the idea somehow that I would harden the blade sharpen and then temper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of the problem may be in how we use the language.  In the outside world "temper" is often misused to cover almost all aspects of heat treating.  In bladesmithing we carefully use specific terms for each step so when discussing things we all know exactly what other smiths mean by "annealing, normalizing , heating to critical, soaking, quenching, tempering, cryo cycling, etc" and so can ask specific questions like "How long and at what temp should I soak a 154CM blade before quenching?" and get meaningful answers.

Yes it's Jargon and serves jargon's purpose in allowing people to make careful differentiation when talking about a subject---besides confusing folks who don't know their winkle fork from their asparagus tongs!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

 Yes it's Jargon and serves jargon's purpose in allowing people to make careful differentiation when talking about a subject---besides confusing folks who don't know their winkle fork from their asparagus tongs!

ThomasPowers, that is a great turn of phrase.  You do have a way with words.

Pnut (Mike) 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, pnut said:

ThomasPowers, that is a great turn of phrase.  You do have a way with words.

Pnut (Mike) 

He speaks from experience, Mike. It must've taken Mrs. Powers a good 15 years to teach him to set the table properly and she's still working on his gaff placement.

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just you wait till I have my crab mallet handy!   (Ahh for the good old days when the dinner setting consisted of fingers and a knife!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Must watch y'all eat icecream with fingers and a knife!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not too hard.  We do that all the time with cones, ice cream sandwiches and bars.^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never had much use for a winkle fork. Mollusks  just aren't my cup of meat.

Pnut (Mike)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe that's why my second wife called me a barbarian. Eating ice cream with two fingers.:lol: With the help of Debi my third wife of 39 years, I've become a little more civilized.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll bring my Croquette mallets and we'll party! 

Deb and I are taking her RV out for the weekend for our 1st. voyage of the season. She doesn't like the idea of driving it in winter and it's still too new to let me drive her new home.  If it's not raining and we can find a spot that doesn't have one of those sections of pipe for a fire ring I'm looking forward to doing a little hearth cooking. 

I'll get to let my barbarian out for a while. :) 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 Takes bignets to catch enough Salmon for a good croquette match. I prefer: crab, lobster, halibut, smoked ham, pineapple, SHARP!!! cheddar cheese, etc. etc. Smoked fill is good.

I'll croquette almost anything. Spam's pushing it but there are worse. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

crab, lobster, halibut, smoked ham, pineapple, SHARP!!! cheddar cheese, etc. etc.  

Seems an odd mix for a croquette; but I guess the double helping of etc helps...I remember my Mother making them in the '60's when fresh fish was less available where we were living.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boy, can't pull one over on you! I rarely put more than one or two goodies in a croquette at a time. 

We never had fancy food like that when I was growing up ad Dad was one of the fussiest eaters I knew, salt and a little pepper was as spicy as he was interested in. Mother slipped a little garlic into her roast beef and pork chops though. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.