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floor mandrels and swage blocks


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Well, I dont have a swage block yet or a mandrel, but I did drag a 340# counterweight off of a loader home from the scrap yard.
It resists moving vigoursly.
I think it is cast iron, but haven't tested other than hitting with a hammer.
I have been thinking about cutting this down and making several swage blocks. It's about 27"x24"x2" or 3" thick.
nothing is square, but that doesn't matter.

I'll post some pics as soon as I can.

Any suggestions?

George

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That's a nice looking swage block Phil. I'm thinking a basic angle iron frame large enough to keep it from jumping clear on the flat and a similar one to hold it on edge. It's light enough you wouldn't need a special lifting mechanism like I do, just something solid and secure.

The one swoopy side might make it an interesting fab but not very.

I like it.

Frosty

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Well, I dont have a swage block yet or a mandrel, but I did drag a 340# counterweight off of a loader home from the scrap yard.
It resists moving vigoursly.
I think it is cast iron, but haven't tested other than hitting with a hammer.
I have been thinking about cutting this down and making several swage blocks. It's about 27"x24"x2" or 3" thick.
nothing is square, but that doesn't matter.


well, it is actually 20 x 24 and here is a photo. just one, it was too lazy to pose in different positions.

George

DSC02116.JPG
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Thomas,
I'll certainly check into this option, hadn't thought of it.

Frosty,
i've got grinders and a drill press, but nothing yet to cut into manageable chunks.

I'll ponder on this for awhile,

Thanks

George

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Ayup, that's a cast iron counter weight you got there alright.

Ever use a hole saw? If you were to put something on the edge of the weight to hold the pilot bit you could use hole saws in the drill press to make half rounds on the edge.

I'd weld a piece of mild steel with a 1/4" hole drilled in it to the edge and use a piece of 1/4" rod instead of a pilot bit. That way there wouldn't be a bit wallowing out the pilot hole making the hole saw wobble.

Frosty

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hoe do you lots your floor mandrels stands look like i am in the process of making a new shop and would like to get a useful and movable stand for my 1,2meter tall floor mandrel have been thinking about a hole in the cement floor but it might be too low
any ideas pics or such ? :)

Cheers DC

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All my use of a cone has been for trueing up curves and so no heavy hammering.

I have a 90# 28" tall one that just sits on a stump and never have had any problems with it.

With a tall one you may want to position it so the area you use the most is at a convient height. (or an adjustable stand!)

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Frosty,

Wore out plenty of hole saws as a refrigeration pipe fitter in the grocery store install bidness.


Still have some, i will give the welded mild steel thing a try,


Always someone with different experience willing to help.


THANKS A BUNCH.


George

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My pleasure George, I hope it works.

Let us know please, it may be something to add to the old tool kit or something to toss. This is one reason I really like tossing ideas out, someone else tests them for me and lets me know how they work. ;)

Life is good.

Frosty

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Frosty,
you kind of remind me of a guy on my paintball team years ago, he would say, go over there and take that spot, to see if anyone was hiding there, if I got shot, he would know someone was there, with friends like that.....

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I have an old 12" square swage block with the various holes. I've used it for through punching and drifting maybe a half dozen times in the last 35 years. That just reflects the nature of my work, which is not huge. It helps when the work is larger than the hardy hole. I have a solid, smaller, Roger Lorance swage block that I used mostly for jump upsetting bars and dishing candle drip pans. I hardly ever stand the swage blocks on edge to use the swages.

I have four mandrels that are not used very often, but I will show students their use when we forge weld rings to dimension. The big one is almost shoulder high, has a 1" thick wall. It's old and does not have the vertical slot. I have used it on occasion to make froe eyes. After forge welding them straight, I then force the eye taper near the top of the mandrel. I have the Salt Fork Craftsmen mandrel which I've used once, and the slot was helpful. I have the Roger Lorance solid one with slot, and I have not used it yet. One other is an old lathe turned one about 10" tall with square shank. I've used it in the vise for small rings like curtain rod rings, etc.

Mention was made of using the large swage for curving wagon tires. I don't do tires, but I have made flat rings with a taper tool that has a hardy shank. My tool is old and measures about 3½ inches wide by 5" long, the length having a flat taper down to a point of zero. The thick part of the taper, about 3/4" is above the shank. It has a radius to help prevent edge marks. The workpiece lies on the tool and the anvil leaving daylight in between.

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