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Boone is not the best place to hunt for scrap, least of which for something a stout as a PH. I've reviewed a goodly number of pictures and descriptions, admire the "Appalachian Power hammer" style. Through perseverance, I feel that I will be able to acquire the right things for it, although it may take time.

One of my questions to the forum is:
Which is preferable for the anvil, lead filled tubing, or solid steel?

Is it wise to use "free weight" plates for the anvil? There is an example on the APH gallery, although I didn't see how they were secured.

Other questions will follow, I'm sure, thanks gang

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Look for a sheet of 4x8ft 1" steel.


So convenient!....not. Boone s dry of anything that fancy:mad:, and I would just as soon not cut it, compared to just buying ...1x4" strips and doing the same.

The lead I have no issue with; I'd be more concerned with the molten aspect. That being said, lead IS yucky stuff, and comments are duly noted.

Markh: "the plans for the rusty hammer are for __?_ on the web" what am I missing there? I know they are available for purchase.

Is this model more efficient while working than the EC-JYH? I know that the shocks on it are not the best format, but is that the only disadvantage? It might be easier to collect the parts for that style, I'm not certain yet.
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FERRUM D. Gentile: Krusty The 100 pound mechanical powerhammer
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From a previous posting, I'm just starting to try to make one based on these details, but round about the 50 pound mark from bits of metal I have lying around,

The only thing none too clear is if bearing metal is required for around the sliding ram, it indicates a couple of mm clearance all round, but I think I would prefer a brass lining even with this clearance. Time will tell.

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I built a RUSTY type in 2002. I bought the plans and while they were somewhat helpfull, they are simply a hand sketch of the general idea and not a set of "Plans".
I next upgraded mine to a tire clitch and 45# ram. This style hammer is only slightly harder to fab up than the baby helve. If I simply wanted to draw I would build the baby helve. If you need to use top tools and need a guided ram, the pivoting spring helve is a little more work but gains function. I think the spring helve has just as much "Snap" as the dupont style mechanism of the LG and "tire hammer". # for # I can see no difference in hit from my spring helve to a LG.

For scrounging, Have a peek at my hammer across the street at Anvilfire on the powerhammer page. I used a hydraulic cylinder rear cap clevis for pivot, a scabbed together anvil and so forth. To build cheaply, one must be a scrounger, and be able to see the "re-purpose" in things one has to hand.
Good luck.

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I was advised against using stacked plates for my power hammer anvil but materials for a solid one were simply out of my reach at the time I wanted to build it. I used several 8" discs 1.25" thick and put them in hydraulic press and put them under pressure to weld them together. The theory was to eliminate as much bounce between the plates as possible. I think it was a success. When struck with a hammer on one end there was a definitive ring and if you place your hand on the other end, you could feel the hammer blows as if it were solid. I don't think that would be true in I hadn't put them under pressure to weld. It would have been a "dead" thud when struck. I then put a sleeve over the stack to give it a nice appearance. There is also a 5" x 5" x 10" solid block of steel on top of this to bring it to the correct height. Perhaps a solid one would have been better but this worked for me. YMMV

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BTW, lead even inside a tube wouldn't make a very good anvil in my opinion as there would still be a crush factor making it even deader than stacked plates that weren't welded. On the other hand, it works good for the hammer. The late Jim Paw Paw Wilson's tire hammer had just such a hammer and his worked just fine! It was a square tube filled with lead weight.
Sorry if I'm coming in late on this conversation, but I've been busy lately on another none smithing project. :D

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One or two members here have one. Starting a new thread or using the search feature may yield better information about the KA-75. I was looking at buying one real hard this spring.

I'll save you some trouble and sum it up....

# 1. It's not a power hammer. Its a power striker. That means you get one hit per pedal push.

# 2. Those that have one or have used one think they are great.

# 3. It is air hungry. You'll need a serious air compressor to feed it for continous operation. I'm sure someone will chime in and say they ran one off a 30 gal sears unit, however waiting for a compressor to recharge is annoying.

# 4. It can hit real hard.

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When someone is considering buying or making a power hammer, its important to consider what you are going to expect from it. If you know what you want it to do for you, as well as what your fabrication skills and interests are, there are many on this site that can give you advice.

The best case would be for you to visit shops that have any hammer you are considering and get a little demo and permission to play a bit.

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I have seen the KA hammer in action and like Chris says ( it hits hard ) but also its one hit for one push of the pedal.
Dont really know about the air consumption
Was really impressed at how hard that little hammer hit though.
I really dont think that I would consider it for an all around do everything hammer but with the right configureation of dies it should be capable of doing a lot of work.

Mike Tanner

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Dodge, is that photo showing a "Tire Hammer" or did you use different plans?

Its a tire hammer, but not THE tire hammer as in the Clay Spencer that most people think of. This is my version patterned loosely after a hammer that was built by Steve Barringer of Mooresville NC for the late Jim Paw Paw Wilson. The biggest difference is that I broke convention by using an "H" bean instead of square tubing for the mast. I believe its wide enough to minimized the twist one would get from an "I" beam.
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  • 3 weeks later...
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First and foremost is the efficiency issues that I have posted about before. Mechanical hammers are handsdown winners for energy efficiency. My 25# Fairbanks uses a 1/2 horsepower motor. My 75# helve uses a 1 hp. My Bradley 300# uses a 10hp motor.

An air hammer of the same equivalent weight takes 4-5 or more times the horsepower for its air compressor and a xxxxxxxx big tank.

Second, plans schmans. If there is a pic available, you can copy the design easily enough, make your own mods and its then your design. I saw a pic of a rusty style hammer years ago and there was an object in that pic that I new the size of. I measured and scaled the drawing from that. My own plans were modified as I went to accommodate the available materials at my shop and scrap yard. My mid size hammer is a 75# helve hammer, inspired by the Rusty designs, but is actually based on a hammer design that dates back possibly as far as 1000 yrs. Power hammers ain't new technology.

Third, if you can build it at all, the challenge of creating it from a bar napkin sketch and modifying it as needed should not be beyond ones skills. Other wise I'd be a little nervous about making it all.

Your mileage may vary, I may just be biased and grumpy.

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