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Cordless angle grinders


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Not directed to you at all.  I own and use 9 inch grinders, 4-1/2 in grinders and Dremel tools.  Each demands respect.  

Nodebt, you are correct.  You get comfortable and you forget to be careful.  

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The site is all about safety.  We try to remind each other, early and often, that there are hazards involved with anything you do.  Blacksmiths play in fire, and everything they do is either hot, heavy, sharp, or dangerous.  You must set your own rules and follow those rules.  Wear eye protection, ear protection, use the back of your hand (much more sensitive) to feel for heat before you pick things up, do not work when tired, etc.

When you say "ouch" it means you forgot to pay attention.  Scars are not bragging rights, they are reminders.  A trip to the ER means you should given things more thought.  Damage to the body, lost body parts, etc is a permeant reminder that you carry with you to be much more careful.  

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I have an 8" Makita corded angle grinder that I bought at an auction 30 years ago.  I can date it because my son was a baby and I recall carrying him on my shoulders down the Boulder pedestrian mall after the sale and he will be 31 next month.  It is big and heavy and very powerful, a MAN"S tool.  It will really do work but I cannot use it for any extended period.  You would need a lot of upper body strength to use it all day.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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One of the things Dad said to me so often I got sick of hearing it is as true as it gets. "Familiarity breeds contempt." Another though not even a close second was, "You can't fear it but you have to respect it."

Some things are inherently dangerous, meaning they can NOT be made completely safe so you cover the bets best you can and roll the dice. Do something dangerous enough times and no matter how careful you are odds are it'll get you eventually. The old adage is, "Go to the well enough and sooner or later you'll drop the dipper."

Frosty The Lucky.

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One personal rule I try to follow, is that if something feels unsafe, then it probably is.  When I feel that way, I try to figure out another way to do it.  Sometimes I cringe seeing the things others do when working with inherently dangerous tools.

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Will, yeah they can be dangerous. Nothing to fear but good healthy caution and best practices and ppe in using one go a long way. It is one of the many tools that if you use it wrong, it can bite you. Fire and flamables can be the same way. I believe there was a thread on angle grinders and safety. Maybe even a few. 

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Now I did make use of a friend's cordless angle grinder recently; my latest pickup truck came with a disk lock on one of the tie down points in the bed.  The previous owner couldn't find the key. My friend's cordless angle grinder removed it.

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I went so far as to purchase a cordless bandsaw to cut up long stock to be able to haul it home, and other tasks. Honestly I also don't like worrying where the cord is situated on the cheaper corded portable bandsaw. 

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22 hours ago, Malleus said:

quality of the Bauer line they carry.

I have several of the Bauer tools. A corded Porta-band saw and a corded reciprocating saw. When buying those type of tools from HF, I always get the extended warranty. The first porta-band died after about a month. Took it back and they gave me another no charge. It's been working just fine for about 2 years now. It's kinda like the luck of the draw with HF. I have horrible luck with battery powered tools. My wife says it's because I have reverse polarity or something like that. I can kill the battery of them just by looking at it and replacement batteries are so expensive.

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I think you're right about that 'luck of the draw' thing.  I've heard a few other people mention similar scenarios.  Thanks for the input.  My reply to the wife would be something like...  well, see...  opposites do attract! 

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 I see a couple of you guys talking dia of grinder i usually use nothing but 5'' grinders the bigger ones are ok for flat but i wouldn't want to be doin much vertical or horizontal work hangin on to one of them..4 1/2 '' are great in tight spots like in boilers and overhead work.

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Late to the party but I’ll go ahead and throw in my two cents, it’s about all it’s worth…

I’ve used Makita and Dewalt cordless angle grinders, they both performed perfectly adequately for my needs at the time. My needs are usually what I’d call light duty. 
Some real good advice here that I appreciate reading for my own future reference, regarding battery commonality and checking the rental places for what they use.

 Cutting up metal in the field is what I’d probably consider pretty heavy use, especially depending on the parameters of the metal being cut, and I have no experience with that. 
There are saws used in my industry for cutting large ductile iron pipe, I’m sure those could probably handle anything you can throw at em. Many are corded and powered by a trailered generator, but I’ve seen just as many cordless. I personally don’t use them cause I’m the guy that gets to stand around and inspect the work before, during and after, and it’s never occurred to me to collect reviews on the specific tools being used but I’d be happy to ask around.

 

I don’t know if it makes a difference, but some folks like to buy American when they can. I’m one of them, but I don’t shy away from foreign products when they suit my needs better. I’ll happily buy a cheap Chinese tool over a pricier American one if I’m going to use it mostly as a dust collector. But here’s an article that breaks it down a bit, just in case it matters to ya.

https://www.protoolreviews.com/what-tools-are-made-in-the-usa/

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I have a couple cordless hand drills, different battery packs and chargers of course. :huh: My first was a Milwaukee when they were pretty cutting edge. It was a heavy beast but powerful, I bought one for Dad one Christmas and he was really unimpressed until he broke his first screw with it in an undrilled board. I was shocked when he told me his battery pack died and he didn't buy a new one he taped a number of C cell alkalines together in the battery frame! Darned if the battery pack on mine wasn't made of C cell alkalines. It died and not long after so did the charger. 

Man that was a long time ago, MAN things have really come a long way. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I've had a number of the older style makita drills and drivers. 

The technology is Way better than it used to be.  

I have a nice milwaukee cordless drill/hammer drill that I kicked around for a while because the charger died and I didn't feel like spending the money on new batteries and charger since it was the older style battery. Found out they make affordable adaptors to fit the new style battery on the older generation too and now it is back in service. 

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