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Anvil Body Styles


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I've seen the Beginners guide to anvils and all the brands that are currently still making anvils. Before I start looking at brand, I was wondering if there a shape guide. a 1:1 for almost ever style that is out there. I bought a cheap Amazon and the face is dented pretty badly after 1 use ( only think i directly hit it once.) like ive seen a nice 2 step down to the horn on one anvil so it went face plate > step down > another stepdown to anvil) I want to see if there are other unique designs that I would like more than the London Pattern Anvil. Thanks!

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Ok I've done enough searching that i found a style out of complete randomness: they look similar to links removed It has a offshoot on the anvil face at a hard 90degree turn  leaving a bump of extra flat material.

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I have always known this style as a "farrier's anvil."  As I understand it a farrier uses the projection on the far side of the anvil face to work the clips on horse shoes.  BTW, I think horseshoe clips are the "cleats" that project downward from the shoe to give the horse more traction.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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As there is no one best style of anvil and  hundreds of variations have been made over the last 3000 years; what I would suggest is not looking at it as a once and done; but like buying a car that you expect you may want to change styles as your needs and wants change.  

Shoot when I was younger I was always wanting to buy bigger and bigger anvils; now in my 60's I sold off a 248# PW and I'd like to add another 100#'r or two as they are easy to take on the road when teaching.

I started out wanting to make blades, a rectangular solid improvised anvil would have suited me fine, or one of the english heavy waisted anvils like a Mousehole, now I do more ornamental and historical work and find the elongated american versions of the london pattern anvil nice to work with.

In my opinion: If your personal style tends towards fussiness; machining is a much better match for you than blacksmithing.

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