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I Forge Iron

Welding on a new leg


FurFinFeather

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Hello IFI - I have this very nice 5" Peter Wright vise BUT it suffered an "amputation" sometime in its past.  What's the preferred method to add a leg?  Would you:

1) taper and weld on a mild steel replacement at the break,

2) cut back the nub to the cheeks and then weld on a new leg or,

3) Keep the nub, weld on a new leg (as in #1) but add a sleeve over the joint?

Any tips for welding mild to wrought as well?

 

Resized_20210916_130958_15605401855971.jpeg

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I'd cut the remainder about 45* the high end facing the back of the vise. Grind the remainder to make deep penetration easy.

Match the new leg to the remainder and tack them at the ends of the angle. Straighten the first tack while it's still hot. Once cool, tack the center of each side. Chip, brush thoroughly and weld it up.

7018 is the rod I've heard most commonly recommended for WI to steel. Of course you can use something exotic and expensive like Eutectic 680 but 1lb. is worth almost as the vise, maybe more.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Well the way I've seen it done was forge welding a wrought iron extension to the wrought iron truncation.

My vise just had a green stick fracture; so we forge welded that and then forge welded a spiral strip of WI over the area to "splint it a bit."

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I had a vice, also leg was cut. Took a rod of mild steel matching the original thickness, used Frosty's method with 7018 arc welding rods (full penetration weld), worked for several years until I sold it (Yes, to acquire a more massive 50 kg German leg vice).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Instead of welding a leg (I'd recommend frosty's method); as an alternative, you could make a matching "socket" which you mount on the floor, as such you can make a low socket and a high socket; depending on your needs ? The stump looks round; it should be possible with a lathe to make a matching socket with a snug fit. 

 

 

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