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SlimW

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Knife #6. I have read that you need to make 40 knives before you should start selling them, so I have a few more to go. I want this one to be good enough to put a maker mark on it, though.

Same metal as #5, hidden tang, skinner. Stock removal (still don't have time to finish my forge). Filing the inside corners of the tang was somehow very satisfying, as I've never really done that before. There is a nick on the one side as the angle grinder got away from me, but that will be hidden by the handle, and I'll polish it down later.

IMG_20210913_140907.jpg

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The 40 knife number seems pretty arbitrary to me. The "real" number depends on the individual maker and how quickly they learn and apply what they learn to the next knife. That is to say there isn't a specific number of knifes you need to make before you start selling them. All that matters is that you and (perhaps more importantly) the customer are happy with the product you're trying to sell.

Chad, I don't think he's done the grinds yet.

 

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8 minutes ago, Frazer said:

All that matters is that you and (perhaps more importantly) the customer are happy with the product you're trying to sell.

Agreed. The first time I sold a knife, I was confident that it would perform as expected and wouldn't break in normal use, even though I hadn't made anywhere near 40 knives. Come to think of it, I still haven't.

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I filed in the sharpening choil first, then used a round file to cut the plunge. I then drew a line down the middle of the plunge and am using that to line up my file stop.

Now comes lots of filing. I didn't consider that the round plunge lined up at an angle, so my ricasso will be angled, but I guess it will be ok.

IMG_20210913_224415.jpg

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I just picked up a couple of fine-toothed files, flat and chainsaw, to finish the first bevel. What an astounding difference a new, quality file makes! I've been using files from buckets of files I picked up at yard sales, and Harbor Freight specials.

There is simply no comparison. I've been working much harder than I needed to.

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I consider files in cans, stacked on each other, etc. at yard, garage, etc. sales as freebies IF they want to sell what I'm considering. Stacking files is like rubbing your knives edges together. They're MAYBE useful high C stock.

Store your files wrapped in a cloth rag so they can NOT rub against each other! Keep your files clean and properly stored, good tools deserve proper storage and handling.

A fresh sharp file is a joy to use. A new file card is NEVER a bad buy unless you have a bunch of new ones on hand. Remember NO pressure or better still lift the file on the back stroke but ease it back onto the work, don't drop it. 

Prepare to move some serious metal Brother Slim! :)

Frosty The Lucky.

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Just a guess? When I took metal shop 1 in jr. high you had to pass a written test before you were allowed to buy your file, then pass another to buy your draw file. Then we got to pass the "shop" test by filing a 3/4" cube from 1" stock. We had our micrometers (bookwork and test passed) to get it right. I believe we were allowed a .0001" tolerance, the cool guys turned them into dice. 

I try not to be pedantic about it but cared for and used properly a file is a joy to use so I tend to carry on. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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A sharp clean file will always make the work easier. I need to invest in some quality files. I have some mediocre ones but I'd like to upgrade soon. 

Pnut

10 hours ago, Irondragon ForgeClay Works said:

good way to rejuvenate old files is to soak them in Cleaning vinegar. It will remove rust and crud in essence sharpening them.

I use muriatic acid then a file card and some talc on all the used files I buy. You'd be surprised how many of them just needed a good acid bath to bring them back to life. 

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the blade survived heat treat. it did warp, though, so I used my precision warp remover while the blade was hot:

IMG_20210916_164352.jpg

this worked pretty well. I had to heat the blade twice, the first try didn't harden. I suspect I didn't have it quite high enough or evenly hot prior to quenching. thats what I get for using an acetylene torch.

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knife handle.

(some assembly required. warranty not included)

IMG_20210916_190332.jpg

The pieces are: deer antler, a chunk of coppery brass I found somewhere, a sheet of brass, a chunk of walnut, and a 3/8-24 screw cap.

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5 hours ago, SlimW said:

my precision warp remover

Precision indeed! I like it. I have a little (equally precise) jig that I use during my tempering cycles.

5 hours ago, SlimW said:

I suspect I didn't have it quite high enough

It's good to keep a magnet handy and check that the whole blade (or at least the whole edge) is non-magnetic before quenching.

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The smell is indeed uniquely unpleasant. The dust is also not good for your lungs so you should wear a respirator while you cut it.

Question: Do you plan on leaving that gap between the ricasso and the antler?

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I definitely wore a respirator, I've read enough about how bad that dust is for your lungs. It helps cut down on the smell somewhat, also.

There will be no gap between the ricasso and the antler, I am making a guard that will fit in that gap. I was going to use that hunk of brass, but it's too thick for this design, and I don't want to waste the material, so I will use some mild steel, I think.

After I cut the antler with my bandsaw, and ground it into basic shape with my belt sander, I cut the hole for the tang by starting with a drill, then hand-filing with a square file. It took a long time and didn't smell much better :lol: Wish I'd had a broach.

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Broaches are easy to make. This was made from a saws-all blade, but any jigsaw reciprocating saw blade will do. just a little grinding and a piece of old wood (dowel) will do. Well the forum is not uploading pictures right now, will try later.:angry:

Broach-4.jpg.613502fe2413f8a410f915b48af1af27.jpg

Edited by Irondragon ForgeClay Works
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