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I Forge Iron

4 years in my smithy.


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Started smithing 4 years ago with some craiglists scores and a washtub forge. 
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a year later in July 2018 got tired of the SoAz sun and added some shade. I was using a rivet forge which is in the back covered with a tub and bucket. 
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fast forward to this morning and I am well settled in. I almost exclusively use the gasser I built a couple years ago and now have a big coal forge that I should really learn to use

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needless to say I am bitten and really would like a big boy shop. Thanks for looking

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I am jealous. I only have my 10x20 shed to work in and over the last month or two, all it has been is a tin plated oven. I try to forge a bit outside when its not boiling hot, but I don't currently have a means of dealing with the wind and it really messes with my venturi burners. I want to build a lean to against my shed to give me an outdoor area to work in the is protected. 

On another note, I left my anvil out the other night not thinking about it. A day later is it very thoroughly covered in rust. Going to have to hit it with the flap wheel to get some of it off the horn. The face will clean back up over time. Dang Ohio humidity. 

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Senior Pedro, that's a fine shop and quite the progression. I wish I saved some pictures of where I started 3 years ago to where I am now.

SinDoc, I hear you. It's been very humid here too.

Don't bother with the flap wheel. That will be a never ending battle and nature will win. A little bit of surface rust isn't going to hurt anything. Heck, my whole life has a layer of surface rust on it. :D If it bothers you, lightly oil the surface of the anvil if you know you'll be out of the shop for a few days.

An anvil doesn't have to be clean to do its thing.

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Brush off loose rust and then use BLO on the sides.  It will have a nice dark patina.   My Ohio Anvil, 134# HB, with the condensation corrosion on the face was painted  on the sides about 80 years ago and is still doing ok there.

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Freshly sanded steel will form surface rust immediately. Burnish it off with a piece of burlap and oil it will help prevent orange rust. Sanding, priming and good quality paint works really well too. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I typically use a paper towel and brush on some veggie oil when I am done, as I have it laying there for my large gridle to prevent it from rusting. I just forgot this time and BOOM, rust. I assume you don't have quite as much problem with it in AZ due to the much drier climate Rojo.

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Nice progression of your space from then to now. I like being able to see the same trees (and the roof cut out) in both shots. I'm getting ready to erect a similar cover over an unused portion of the yard to move my smithy, 17 years on the patio, to a space where I can leave stuff out instead of packing it away and tarping after every session.

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Heres is another angle. 12’x 12’ under cover. It is almost perfect for 1 smith. 2 works but its tight and 3 is a crowd for sure.

there was a monster 12’ diameter prickly pear with a pack rat nest in the middle in this spot when I first moved out here. Took 2 truck loads and a weekend to clear it out. 011CEE8F-648F-4D00-BE08-15050E44F662.thumb.jpeg.a56e84863204f451ef213c63998e47fc.jpeg

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You don't like prickly pear glazed pack rat?:o You had a working rat ranch, all you needed was a food cart and a corner! 

Boy, some people, you just never know do you?:P

Looks like a nice place to work. 3's a crowd unless you're set up for large groups.

Frosty The Lucky.

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What is your flooring material and did you do much ground prep before laying it down?

I'm on dirt at the moment, with about a ton of gravel filling a french drain around the perimeter of the space. Need to level the dirt a bit more and then considering decomposed granite for a 'floor'.

Michael

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Decomposed granite compacts nicely. I strongly suggest your shop floor be at least a few inches higher than the French drain.

I know that's mighty obvious but just in case. I miss the obvious with discouraging regularity.

Frosty The Lucky. 

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I live in a desert and the soil is rated for direct pour with concrete---no topsoil "subsoil to surface".  I framed in my shop floor with PT lumber and filled it with sand/clay/dirt/gravel from the local arroyo a dozen years ago and it's been working fine and is easy on the feet&joints&back.  When I rearrange everything I will probably regrade the floor with the same stuff as you can tell where the popular spots are!

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