Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Pepper used as flux?


Recommended Posts

Not sure if this would be the correct category or not, as I am not sure that is what it is being used for, but I was watching the video below by Shurap. In the beginning, before he seals up the cannister, he puts what I assume is cracked black pepper and some kind of Chili pepper. What is the purpose of that? Is it being put in to act as a sort of flux?

 

 

EDIT:

Disregard the question. Apparently it is done as a joke to add "sharpness" due to something in the Russian language about spicy being sharp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Additional carbon, traditionally charcoal powder, fabric, hair etc. have been added. The carbon traps the oxygen trapped in the canister and if a small hole is provided vents resultant CO and CO2 preventing scale formation. Many modern makers simply spray penetrating oil on the billet for the same effect. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is what I had thought. I didn't think a google search would return anything, but apparently Shurap does it because spicy more or less is sharp in Russian, so he does it as a joke to "add sharpness". What I get for posting something before checking Dr Google first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh no, I'm glad you asked and posted the link. I learned a few things watching. I was wondering how much pattern you could develop from such a tightly packed uniform billet and a new term in Russian.

It was a win win! Thanks for posting! 

It was indeed a pretty sharp pattern.

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen a variation done with key stock. It comes in various alloys and you can stack it tight to form letters that can then be welded and drawn out, sectioned and stacked with other ones to form words.  A bit pixelated; but easier for most folks than using wire edm to carve the shapes in differing alloys and then restacking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Eastern Europe (where both he and I are from) the word for spicy and sharp and more or less the same. It's a pun.

He's putting the peppers (spicy) into the steel for the blade to make it sharp(sounds the same as the word for spicy).
I'm not sure if I've communicated it well but that's what's going on. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You explained it perfectly. I thought pun's were mostly an english language thing. Being we have so many words that sound the same but have different meaning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, no; puns happen in many languages. The Navajo are famous for their puns.

Some puns work in more than one language. For example, if you were to ask "Where do cats go when they die?", an English speaker could say "Purrgatory", and an Italian speaker could say "Purgattorio".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alan Dean Foster wrote a number of novels where Navajo puns were so integral the stories were almost based on them. I have to see if I can find the audios for my Kindle.

Where do cats go when they die? To the place that's hardest to get their bodies out. That's where.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...