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I Forge Iron

Etching a brand-new anvil


Force-patina on your brand-new anvil to control rust...  

7 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you do it?

    • Yes
      1
    • No
      6


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I live in a tropical contry, therefore in order to don't let my stuff rust in one day I got my workshop built outside, veranda style.

It helps but it doesn't do miracles.

So now, for the first time I decided to buy a brand-new anvil, a good one.

I stripped off the paint, dressed the edges and stuff... but now there's a lot of shiny metal exposed to air.

And this is when I thought: a forced patina helps with taking under control red rust on blades... so why shouldn't it work with a just little bigger chunk of steel?

So far I've just been keepin my stuff well oiled, but sometimes for some works I need to degrease everything and it's not fun... If a forced patina could help...

 

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I would go with either an industrial paint or what my go-to is engine or exhaust paint on the parts you won't be hammering on. They would hold up better to harsh conditions. You would want to degrease the anvil and heat it up to around 70- 80° F. Or basically follow instructions for the paint use for best results. Other than the heat cure on the engine or exhaust paint. They will still work well without the high heat cure from my experience. 

As far as the hammered on surfaces, I dont know that a patina would hold up to hot hammering on them. Might save spots that aren't heavily used. You might still have to keep those oiled when not in constant use. 

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Use ATF automatic transmission fluid and wipe with a cloth when you finish forging.  Keep it oiled.  The ATF does not interfere with forging as it is removed where the hot metal touches it.

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And no need to force a patina, it will form fast enough. Just wipe off the orange rust that forms, and in no time it will have a nice coating. My anvils are exposed to the weather too, and the areas that are used will shine up as the scale polishes it. I just leave mine since I live in a desert. The 2" we got in 45 minutes the other day was the first real rain we had gotten in a couple of years. 

 

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A high end acid etch primer and 2 part epoxy finish paint is pretty durable. There are phosphate primers that form an iron phosphate layer that's pretty rust proof. 

I put a good layer of Trewax on mine after it'd warmed up enough to melt the wax and it's been pretty rust free for 25 or more years. The face gets a skim of rust in a day or so when not in use and doesn't worry me. A wipe with an oily rag when I put it away would take care of that. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Gentlemen, 

 

thanks for all the advices, feel like I've finally made up my mind.

Paint... naaa, paint it's a hurban legend, I don't believe in the existence of paint.

It's like bigfoot, flat earth or business plans.

Trewax or ATF automatic transmission are quite palatable, I am gonna experimenting both ways and see.

Thanks!

 

Cheers,

Martello

 

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In places that are wet and close to the ocean; pitch has often been used as a rust inhibiter.  It may be cut with turpentine to make it easier to apply---for the sides of the anvil of course; the face you should use often enough to keep clean!  (And, if not, wipe it down with an oil after use while it's still warm.)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yep, I don't have rust issues on the hitting surfaces, I use them often enough.

 

Pitch !! That would be a great option indeed!

My area is kinda rural... suppliers here don't have such special items,

but if somehow I could manage to get some I would give it  a shot for sure,

 

thanks!

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Anybody collecting honey in your community? You might be able to pick up some bees wax for not much. 

How important is it to you to prevent your anvil from developing a rust patina? 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I would just use it. I usually put a hot oil finish on my work and I do it on my anvil. That should do the trick. Of course. it depends on how much time you spend on your anvil.

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Actually a rust patina is desirable, I mean, a stable brown one.

All the other anvil I got in my life they all were used with their well developed patina. This is my first brand new anvil, that's why I don't really know how to deal with it.

And yeah, this is a tropical place, moreover the ocean is 3 miles away as the crow flies... I don't feel like I want to underestimate this enviroment.

Natural wax can't be found nearby. Maybe pitch or other chem waxes like trewax...

  

On 7/22/2021 at 7:50 AM, BIGGUNDOCTOR said:

Just let it rust. When you see orange rust, buff it off with a rag, Not down to bare steel, just until the orange is gone. You will have a nice patina in no time.

Sounds like an extrema ratio but sure... this should work too.

Plus, I bet all my other anvils faced the same fate :D 

As for now I am just keeping wiping it off every day, like I never did even with my first car.

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