Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Tacoma Wa improvised anvils


Recommended Posts

here is my improvised anvil. a peice of 516-70 steel i picked up from a fab shop for 20 bucks. its been hardend. Doesn't ring much and has about 80% rebound w a 1in ball bearing. I haven't used it much yet,just built the stand a few days ago. Still heating up metal with my torch.

20210616_184445.jpg

20210616_184452.jpg

20210616_184539.jpg

well its been awhile but I finally got my anvil stand built. I was wondering how to secure it to the stand. Right now its just sitting in it. granted it weighs almost 400 lbs and is pretty solid. But to move it I built it so I could attach wheels to the base to move it around. I was thinking about welding it to the base but its hardend steel and I would have to heat it up to around 500 degrees Fahrenheit to get good penetration. so does anyone have other ideas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to guess about 430 pounds, assuming dimensions of 5" x 10" x 20" and assuming 490 pounds per cubic foot.  Only a SWAG.  It is one of the nicer improvised anvils I have seen recently.  It should work fine and there are work arounds for hardies and horns.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Glenn changed the title to Tacoma Wa improvised anvils

That is a great anvil! I'd REALLY like to see it on a wider base, if that falls on a foot it's a crippler. I'd weld it to the stand  and weld your stand to a piece of plate to make a wide foot. It's probably plenty stable long ways so I'd maybe make the plate square. You could move it with a hand truck with a flat square foot.

Try a couple long tack welds to see if the crack, if not I'd stich weld it an inch or so at a time in different places. Say 4-6 stitches to a side alternating sides should make it plenty secure. 

If the test beads crack, repeat the test with Super Missleweld a welding supply will sell small quantities, maybe even individual sticks from broken boxes. 

SWEET ANVIL!

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heavens to Betsy! That's an impressive hunka hunka steel!

I would second Frosty's suggestions, especially about expanding the footprint of the stand. If you're reluctant to do any welding on it at present, I would recommend putting a layer of silicone caulk between the anvil and the stand for a bit more rigidity and stability.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, I keep hearing "Also sprach Zarathustra"  just looking at that anvil!

I would weld to it and far enough from the bottom edge that if there is a problem it won't affect it; just in case you ever want to flip it over and use the other end as the face.  

If you don't want to weld on it: build a fence that clamps to the anvil to hold it    (Perhaps have the fence extend a bit past the anvil and put a bolt in either end to squeeze it.

I also suggest figuring a way to keep it from tipping.  I've managed to tip a 469# anvil working on it.  Not a lot of fun!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another thought occurs to me, if you don't want to weld on it: make a stand that it sits down into. Something like this swage block stand, just without the wide rim for laying it flat:
swage stand.jpg
(NB: Image originally posted in this comment.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeah I've been thinking the stand is a little undersized. However I like having a tripod to support it. my shop floor is not very level and the 3 points of contact make it pretty stable. the anvil is so tall that the stand is only 11 in high. I made the angle on the legs 11° probably should have gone 15°. I need to be able to put it away when I'm doing other projects, so came up with a way to attach wheels to it and a handle when I need to move it. I can cut pretty nice circles with my plasma cutter. maybe weld 5 in circles to the bottom of the legs. I have a piece of 3/4"×6"×4' cold rolled steel i could cut them out of. I'd fill the legs w sand but their so short i don't think it would make a difference. I'm not sure how hard it is. but I'm thinking about milling a dovetail on the side to add a horn or a hardy hole. I have a piece of steel for a striking anvil 2"×8"×14" just need to machine a 1" round hole into a 1" square hole. gonna try to do it on my mill. I have a 1/8" carbide mill then get it square w a file. anyway thanks for all the advice and I'll let you know how it progresses.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to know that you’ve got the tooling and the skills. Flat circles under the feet is a good idea. Set up the anvil and stand in the place where you’ll use them before welding so that the pad feet will fit the floor nicely in that spot. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, 1,400 cubic inches. At 0.283 lbs/in^3, that would be 396.2 lbs. 

On 6/17/2021 at 12:04 AM, George N. M. said:

I'm going to guess about 430 pounds, assuming dimensions of 5" x 10" x 20" and assuming 490 pounds per cubic foot. 

5” x 10” x 20” = 1,000 cubic inches, or 0.579 cubic feet. At 490 lbs/ft^3, that would be 283.71 pounds. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...