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TL;DT- I have vise, no work, long time, grandpa, welding attempts to fix.

When I was attempting a couple different electrical welding styles since my TIG is down a few more days, I had a ARC jump at the start and then a little spatter damage right at the edge of my screw box. Now, I could cut the broken tab back off, then carefully attempt to remove a little material on the box with a bandsaw possibly, but I'll be back to possibly getting a different rod type tomorrow and having to re weld the pieces, build a cage around it that eliminates the tab for now until my TIG is up, or bevel the material and use JB Weld like machinable material I use for body restoration and some non load bearing parts. I've got the screw to go back all the way thru, but I haven't bolted everything back together because of the oil and such all over the vise. I had to kinda work the screw back and forth, but I've gotten it all the way through the piece. But it's taking lite beating or handle extension to tighten it or loosen to a lesser extent. My question is, if I run this in and out a few times, will it start to wear the threads just enough to clean it up to what a typical vice feels like? This has actually been a xxxxx to tighten as far back as I can remember it, but it's been broken. So I assumed fixing it would cure a lot of that. I need to bead blast the rest I think and then paint and oil, or maybe oiled cast will just look better? The way this has been going, I'm gonna go pick up Ni55/Ni99 rod tomorrow possibly. Otherwise wait for my new regulator to come or look into getting my Oxy/Acy tanks filled. Idk. The screw box is more where my concern is at mostly now. Run screw in and out and it'll get cleaner and easy up with some in and out?

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Maybe related:  When ever you weld, always attach the negative as close to the work as is practicable.   If you attach the negative to a metal work table the arc will jump from the negative lead to the table, from the table to the vise, from the base of the vise to the screw, from the screw to the jaw, and from the jaw to the work being clamped.  That is an electric arc at each point, which may cause pitting.  

Weld on a project resting on the metal table.  When your finished, the project is stuck to the table by the electrical arc jumping from the table to the project. 

Ask a mechanic why they disconnect the battery before welding on a vehicle.  

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Yeah, no mate. I get what you're saying, I'm an electrical engineer. There's no clamping the piece. The tab meets the base of the screwbox and the repair is there. I got just a touch of melt on the box right at the back and a little spatter. Literally, I could grind a slight 1/16" or less off the back, use a metal chop saw, run it through a portable band saw, etc, to clean it off, but deburring would be a concern. This has always been a xxxxx to thread in and wouldn't tighten. But I'm restoring my garage and got irritated and decided to open it up. The screwbox basically just spins until it hits a side and travels. Working the box back on, I'm screwing through it, but loose, it's still not tightening easily. I know there's lite spatter damage, on top of nothing held in place, so I understand that's probably contributing to difficulties. If I keep running the screw in and out, will the threads clean up or wear enough on their own to clean up the spatter? I'm restoring everything and debating debating sand or bead blasting everything. Be easy if I just had a xxxx tap.

 

I might coat the vise in degreaser and then oil it nicely, or even paint it. Lite sand all the contact slide surfaces. If I keep having struggles with the weld, I'm going to build a cage and with JB Stick, 2 part liquid, or this type I use with a high metal content for magnet test body repair which is also machinable.

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If the vise it tight, there most likely is a reason.  Look for any signs of wear or debris being wiped off the parts.  Measure the tightness zones and try to relate that to the problem.  See if you can find any misalignments or bent parts.  Keep everything lubricated, to avoid damage, until you can find the cause.

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Got any valve grinding compound?  Are the threads currently nice and square?  When you say that it spins; do you mean tht the screwbox is loose in the yoke and you may have an issue with the keel that is supposed to lock it from turning in the yoke? (I've seen this with some marriages of vise and screw/screwboxes---remember you used to be able to buy replacement screw/screwboxes out of the Sears Roebuck catalog!)

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Pictures might help diagnose the problem. I would take the screw box out, soak it in a 50/50 mix of acetone and automatic trans fluid for a couple of days. Applying heat to the screw box may mess up the brazed in threads on older vises. Are the threads of the screw in good condition or are they tapered from use with crud in the screw box.

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