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I Forge Iron

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mpc

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Stumbled upon this today. 5” jaws. $250. 
I was still in my clothes from court so I didn’t get a chance to take a good look. 
I think I just found me a new vise. 

D6D0A150-B4F5-488F-9C13-B9FFBF68AE97.jpeg

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Looks good from the outside, a bit rich but that's what negotiating is for. 

I see what looks like a sort of caveman-ish feet and hand sculpture, lawn art? But what really catches my eye is how serious a duck hunter the fellow must be. Decoys and a fired recoilless rifle casing.

Let us know what you find out when you go back. You ARE going back, yes?

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty, now you have me thinking about a 106mm RR punt gun.  That would avoid the recoil pushing the boat back but the back blast would be a problem.  I wonder how many #4 or #6 shot would fit into a 106 mm casing, even with a reduced charge.  8-10 pounds?  10 lbs of #6 shot would be 36,000 pellets per round.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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 A punt gun is a huge shotgun, with the barrels were somewhere between ten and thirteen feet in length..  The diameter of the gun's bore, the interior of the barrel, typically exceeded two inches, and each firing would dispense more than a pound of shot across the water.

The granddaddy of all punt guns – Irish Tom, was the world’s largest. Created in Great Britain in the 1930s by W.W. Greener and the Whitworth Factory of Manchester, this gun weighed over 300 lbs, had a 14′ 1″ barrel, and fired 3lbs 2oz of buckshot, with the help of about 10 ounces of black powder The original owner, Stanley Duncan, claimed his best shot downed 100 ducks.

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I suppose a recoilless punt gun would be a beginner's reinvention of the craft, often remembered as "one shot wonder" (where they went).

Frosty The Lucky.

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This is at a little antique store in a small Idaho town. It’s at a crossroads between the interstate and Sun Valley, ID so they get the wealthy/bored tourist traffic. The seller has dozens of rusty sheet metal art pieces. I’m sure there are dozens of condos in Sun Valley with a Sasquatch or two. 

I went back today. The screw looked good. I offered $150 but they said they only had authority to go down to $200. The vise (and all other stuff in the photo) don’t  belong to the store owner. They’re from a guy who rents space there.

From the response I got, I think the guy probably paid more than $150 for it. 
 

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There you go with the logic again John! The store owner will still expect his/er % of the sale but fair is fair. 

Might ask if 50% of something isn't better than 100% of nothing.

Frosty The Lucky.

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In my line of work (professional fundraiser, for those who didn't know) we have a few sayings about "making the ask": "Never say No on the donor's behalf", "Not asking is worse than getting a No, because if you'd asked, you might have gotten a Yes", and "Don't let your fear of hearing No get in the way of giving the donor the opportunity to say Yes."

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Makes the voices compose a version of Thomas Edison's response to the question about failing. They're not failures, now I know 10,000 ways not to squeeze blood out of this turnip.

Frosty The Lucky.

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