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I Forge Iron

Filling the JABOD


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ISTR some TX folk dealing with finding what to fill their JABOD with.  Well I just ran across: "Wilcox Sand-Kaolins of Northeastern Central TX"  UT publication number 5416, August 15 1954.   

A sand kaolin mix sounds very promising for a JABOD liner to me!  Low shrink/swell and high temp tolerance.  The booklet shows outcrops along some local roads...

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Here at work we have a "free table" where folks moving or retiring or changing Universities can drop off stuff.   It's been piled high since the semester is now over.  Now if I only was interested in evaporates or talc deposits...or pumice and pumicite deposits.  I did snag an old copy of "A Dictionary of Mining, Mineral and related terms "  Might come in handy if you catch my drift---or adit!

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2 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Well I just ran across: "Wilcox Sand-Kaolins of Northeastern Central TX"  UT publication number 5416, August 15 1954.   

That would definitely be useful. There are several large sand deposits in Central Texas. There are two sand pits that I know of between Cleburne and Waco and one east of Corsicana. 
 

Roadside ditches appear to be public property in Texas; so, I’m guessing it’s legal to harvest a few bucketfuls of sand from them but I don’t know that for sure. 

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Unless there are intervening deposits of other soils insulating the kaolin from the sand, the intermediate value theorem would support your gamble.

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3 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

It's not the sand you want it's the Kaolin clay mixed with sand!  Kaolin is one of a group of clays that are used in making fireclays with fusion temps over 2900 degF.

Interesting. Most of the sand around here is red sand. Since koalin is white, I’m assuming it would look closer to beach sand. The sand pit east of Corsicana had white sand if I remember correctly (it’s been a few years since I was out there)

Did the book show any “major” cities? The area it covers is rather large without some form of reference. I’ve only been able to find one copy of the book online. Since it was published by UT, I’m assuming there aren’t very many of them in circulation.

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Kaolin is what makes paper take ink without bleeding and is also what helps control the runs. Its the Kayo in kayo-pectate. Yeah, drink clay and gelatin that'll fix that little problem.  

Silica sand is the problem in forge liners, it melts and clinker sticks by fusing with it. DARN, I can NOT remember the type of mineral sand that doesn't fuse well with silicas and iron. I THINK it has a too high melting temp. I'll have to ask the caster in our club he collects sand for his petro-bonded molding sand. Silica sand causes him serious problems sand casting bronze. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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4 minutes ago, Frosty said:

DARN, I can NOT remember the type of mineral sand that doesn't fuse well with silicas and iron.

Olivine sand?

Pnut

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Maybe, I'll have to ask Pat. I'm sure the sand he collects isn't the only non silicate sand that works. Hmm, a casting supply probably sells sand for high temp casting!

The Sherlock voice is muttering names at me now.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Not helpful regarding the mineral sand types but an interesting read for an old soils exploration driller. If I wanted to dig a couple holes I could narrow down the soil type we built on but I've dug enough holes for a lifetime.

The soils engineering section was like old home week. I spend almost 20 years collecting and generating that kind of data, the lab refined it and so on. Doing that job so long is why I picked this spot to build on, earthquakes tend to just jolt us though long duration quakes tend to shake things off walls and shelves. I don't think anybody who built on the series of ridges in this formation have suffered even moderate damage in the 4-5 quakes since we moved here. I'm only counting id 6 - 7+ quakes, we have a dozen 5s a year and <4s almost daily. I'm sort of bummed none of the volcanoes visible from here have erupted since the mid 90s. 

Sorry, I spent too long working in the field, not to have the voices whispering old stories and anecdotes. 

It's too early to call Pat and see if he knows the mineralogy of the sand he uses. I think he does, he prefers to KNOW what's what especially when it effects his profession. I'd email but he stays as far offline as he can manage. Like I say, smart guy.

Thanks again for the link it brings back memories.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I REMEMBERED! I called Pat and the sand he uses for high temp sand casting is "Green Diamond" sand blasting media. It's single source and green. I looked at their site and it's Magnesium orthosilicate, it's a very popular sand blasting sand, available in Palmer Alaska for IIRC around $25/100 sack. It's the sand Pat uses for the molds at the annual iron pour and is unaffected by thick section iron castings.

Art on Fire is this June 26th. at the museum by the Wasilla Airport. 

It should work a treat in JABOD  clay& sand "dirt". 

Frosty The Lucky.

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