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I have a nice "sickle moon" scar on my inside left wrist, courtesy of a piece of hot pipe that rolled unexpectedly. I can cover it with a wide watch band and tell folks that notice it that I belong to a secret society and can't tell them any more... 

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Scale can also set your britches on fire. I know this from the huge scar i have on my leg. It will also burn small holes in the bottom the legs, no big deal at the time except they are just at the right height to catch on the hooky things for my boot laces about a 1/2" higher than where they would be with the waist on my belt line. So it tugs down enough to be annoying and you have to give a little slack to get it undone and...oooo its frustrating. 

 

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Borax rinse and line dry can help fireproof your pants.

How many here have a series of holes in a line in your T shirts from forge welding juicy billets?   (Raises hand...)

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one thing i was taught for burns was cool imediatly then heat area again as hot as you can stand cool and repeat 2-3 times this keeps blistering down also a good lather of egg white and/or Aloe Vera will help as well.

M.J.Lampert

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Series of holes? Some of mine look like lace!:lol:

Best thing i have found for a burn. When i first started smithing someone, and it may have been some one here, told me that as soon as you get burned, say your hand, stick it in the slack tub and keep it moving until the pain goes away. It works. Not real feasible though to stick half my leg in there, not only can i not lift it that high any more, i would have to get half naked. It would be cool to see the look on the neighbor if they saw me half naked with my leg in a barrel of water though.

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12 hours ago, BillyBones said:

Scale can also set your britches on fire.

I learned the hard way to unroll the cuffs on my jeans whenever I light the forge. I also lost a chuck key in my cuff one day. I spent the better part of an hour looking through gravel for it before I thought to check the cuffs in my pants legs:P

Pnut

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Burns have been discussed on the site many times.

One reason to keep a 5 gallon bucket of clean water handy.  You can put an entire foot into the bucket, or dip and pour for larger or longer areas.  

15 minutes of wet time whether there is pain or not.

 

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P-nut, i just imagined you with the rolled up cuffs, tucked in white t-shirt with a pack of cigarettes' rolled into the sleeve looking all James Dean or maybe Marlon Brando. 

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The best reason I know of to keep a slack tub in the shop is to mitigate burn injuries. No safety measure is perfect and flying: scale, red HOT dingle balls, slag, pinch offs, etc. are insidious about finding a place to nestle up to your hide.

Stop the meat from cooking in cool water, COLD is bad but better than nothing. I've never heard of warming the burn back up and cooling it again but there are many things I haven't heard of.

The two ointments I keep close when doing hot work are Aloe Vera gel, I buy the sunburn ointment in the squeeze bottle and it works as well as pealing an aloe leaf. Remember just cover the burn, do NOT rub it in! 

A couple years ago I made a find I've been very pleased with called, "Armor Gel" It contains colloidal silver and is an excellent burn or wound ointment. It's NOT as effective as Silvadene gel but that's a prescription medication here so it's not something you can toss in your tool bag. I can't anyway. 

I keep burns open to the air if they're closed wounds, 3rd degree burns need medical attention soonest except maybe those little red craters with the burnt edges red HOT dingleberries make. I've never had more than momentary pain when they happen, the smell of burnt flesh is worse. They've always healed up with a mark or my arms and hands would be covered in a scar.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I was stuck in the hospital for almost three weeks with a MRSA infection in my arm. I have a shooter marble sized hunk of meat missing now on my forearm. I became septic. I nearly died. 

Pnut

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20 hours ago, BillyBones said:

P-nut, i just imagined you with the rolled up cuffs, tucked in white t-shirt with a pack of cigarettes' rolled into the sleeve looking all James Dean or maybe Marlon Brando

Hahaha, nope that was my Dad. Pork chop sideburns, royal crown hair dressing, and pegged and cuffed Levi's. He even carried his Kools in his sleeve. I wish I still had a picture of him. He was exactly what you think of if you picture a 1950's biker. I still have his panhead. It's been wrecked for the last four years though. I probably won't ever ride it again but I can't bring myself to get rid of it. 

Pnut

 

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Your lucky, my dad between the time he got out of Vietnam and the time he re-enlisted, about 5 years or so, he had an afro, wore the polyester shirts with those big wide collars, bell bottoms and lamb chops. 

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Geeze, my Father was so uncool. He never worked in a T shirt, his work clothes were dark green long sleeved no cuffs. Looky there I loaded the one pic I have of Dad spinning and his sleeves are rolled up. Spinning hot is really HOT work so. . . It was the machinist's suit of the day metal spinners were considered machinists. His hair was always cut and neat, BrylCreem was his hair dressing and if it touched the top of an ear he hit the barber shop. I don't remember him ever wearing cuffs pants or shirt but maybe during the 30s swing era and he was cruising the ladies. Never synthetics in the shop. Later when he was running his own shop employees wore the "uniform". 

In the pic Dad is spinning a rocket or jet engine alloy that required heat to move at all. Holding torch was one of my jobs too. Hot and smoky job but you got to learn a lot about spinning exotic alloys.

Frosty The Lucky.

705447336_spinninghot.jpg.99b9023b9f06c6f5a155f372210c1419.jpg

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Pictures and a single audio recording is the only way I know what my pops looked or sounded like. He died when I was two. He left me a bike, a fly rod, the sidearm he carried in Korea, and his last name. 

Pnut

 

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My father was an engineer and would often wear a white shirt,  sports coat and a tie on weekends around the house as that is what he wore to work....

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Father wore his work shirt all the time. 

pnut: You make me even more thankful for all the quality time I got with my parents, both were still going strong when I moved out at 20 and for another 30 before Dad started to fade. 

I'll be more than happy to share memories of them, it makes them sharper in my mind.

Frosty The Lucky.

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