Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Blacksmith shop for sale?


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 56
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

18 hours ago, BillyBones said:

Are there many Norwegian Blues in Sweden? I would figure they could fly to Sweden from Norway. I would have one as long as he is not pining for the fjords. 

They're kipped out after a prolonged skawk currently.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After I sell my folks estate in CA I could buy that and move.  Not a fan of rain and snow though, but that is a beautiful shop.

I wonder if the Swedish bikini team is still active :D

Any restrictions on non Swedes owning property?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, BIGGUNDOCTOR said:

After I sell my folks estate in CA I could buy that and move.  Not a fan of rain and snow though, but that is a beautiful shop.

I wonder if the Swedish bikini team is still active :D

Any restrictions on non Swedes owning property.

LoL,

I'm guessing the taxes you'll end up paying for the sale of California real estate would by a few shops here.

As far as I know foreigners can own property here.  The problem is with staying any length of time for non residents. 

Political content removed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like it is in Southern Sweden , so the weather is better than further up North.  Residency requirements for things like healthcare? I can understand that.  I pulled up some information on living in Sweden, and it sounds pretty nice in a lot of ways, plus I love old Chryslers, and a lot of our  finned beauties have ended up in Sweden :D  

I couldn't tell from the listing, but how much property comes with the shop?  My head is spinning with the possibilities, and the chance to do some traveling.

Here in the Nevada desert the summers can be pretty brutal (110F-115F) so a cooler climate sounds very tempting from June, July, and August. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bigundoc,  You're right, a lot of fine American steel made its way over here.  Many post war, service HD Flatheads are still on the road here.  Very cool.

On Sunday's with nice weather you will see a lot of vintage Detroit machines, totally restored, cruising down the way.

Since  salt on the roads is popular during the winter months, these vehicles don't go out into harsh elements and have a pampered existence.

But not today, we just had a snow flurry 20 minutes ago... LoL.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

aaamax, what is the average cost of living in that area? How much would one need to make income wise to be comfortable?  And how are things like cost of fuel (gas or diesel)? It appears Gysinge is a fairly small town, and the nearest "big" city is Stockholm, is that correct?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Biggundoc,

The biggest difference you would find would be in petrol prices.  Here it is close to $2 a liter.  BUT, one generally doesn't drive as much here as the average American presumably does.  Aside from that, your grocery bill and all else would look about the same.  However, we are one of the last State controlled liquor retailers.  Meaning that there is only one outlet for purchases and some towns/villages don't have one.  So you have to drive to the nearest one which can be over 45minutes away in the next larger town.  [Political content removed]

But as with all things, there is the good and the bad.  It is all about finding the balance that works for you.

Personally anything north of Stockholm is too nasty weather wise.  I would stay south of Stockholm if one could choose.

Cheers.

Edited by Mod34
Political content deleted
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here in Ohio we call the place to buy liquor the State Store. You have to have a license from the state liquor agency to sell anything over 40 proof. They have gone from independent stores to now drive throughs and carry outs can get the license.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While it seems strange to many folk who are not from the USA, we have a very wide patchwork of liquor laws here.  It will often vary from state to state and even from county to county and municipality to municipality.  Some areas are dry with no legal liquor sales and others are pretty wide open.  A lot of the peculiarities date from the repeal of national prohibition in 1933.  Generally, the more restrictive liquor laws are found in areas that are more conservative religiously, e.g. the southern US and more heavily Mormon areas like Utah.  In those areas it is often considered that if liquor is not sinful in and of itself it will lead folk to sinful acts.

There are also places where liquor licenses are an article of commerce.  Here in Wyoming there is a maximum number of liquor licenses allowed in a town/city or county by population.  So, if the maximum number of licenses have been issued and you want to open a place serving liquor you are out of luck or you have to buy out an existing business which already has a license.  Also, the state is the sole liquor wholesaler.  Anything a bar or liquor store sells at retail must be purchased wholesale from the state.

In other areas, such as Ohio or Utah, all retail sales of liquor are from state liquor stores which may have limited hours or locations.

There are also varying restrictions on sales by the drink.  In Utah, while there has been some loosening in recent years, there used to be no by the drink sales in the way most of us are familiar.  But, you could buy liquor by the drink in "private clubs."  Many "clubs" were pretty loose in their membership requirements.  I recall being in Utah and purchasing a "membership" at the door for a dollar or two.

While the expression "Eat, drink, and be merry for tomorrow you may be in Utah" isn't as true as it used to be there are some areas of the state which are pretty dry regarding alcohol.

Beer and, sometimes, wine is generally not as strictly regulated as beverages of higher alcoholic content.

As you can probably tell liquor licensing used to be one of my legal specialties.

BTW, aaamax, where are you in Sweden?

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

George, we have that same law about how many liquor license are allowed. I am not sure how they do with bars but i think that bars are not allowed to sell liquor for consumption out side the establishment but they can beer.

Where i grew up in KY it was a dry county, liquor came in a Mason jar, i went back for  a visit a few years ago and stayed in the new hotel they built. As i sat in the bar of the motel enjoying a beer it hit me that i was not supposed to be able to. So i asked what happened with the dry county. The only liquor license in the entire county was given to that motel. May have something to do with it was one of the huge chain motels. 

I cannot remember if it was when i was stationed at Ft. Hood or Ft. Knox that if you went out one gate it was dry but the other gate it was a wet county. Guess which had more traffic. 

Not sure if it is true or not but a shot of liquor is called a shot because in the old west you could get a small drink for a bullet. Maybe a wives tale, i dont know. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let us not forget Oklahoma and 3.2% Beer!  The Woman's Christian Temperance Union was founded in Hillsboro Ohio.

My Grandfather's farm in Arkansas had a neighbor that used to run liquor into dry counties and my College housemate's Mother came from a family of moonshiners and used to be a lookout back when she was a little girl. (I was visiting them once and she told me that some city folk had bought some land and built a place and "looked down" on the poor ignorant hillfolk.  Well it was back during the oil crisis and the "city folk" bought themselves a gasohol still  kit and made up a fermentation batch and ran it through their still and got *distilled water*.  She was laughing and said "Shoot anybody at church could have told them what they did wrong!")

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I moved to North Carolina in the '70's, liquor-by-the-drink was still illegal. When I asked why, the general concesus was that moonshiners were making so much money they could afford lobbyists to keep it that way. If you wanted drinks with a meal, you brought your bottle in a bag and took it home with you if there was anything left. IIRC it changed in the early '80's and went county-by-county.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, BillyBones said:

Where i grew up in KY it was a dry county, liquor came in a Mason jar,

The county in KY I live in right now was dry until three years ago. The funny part about a dry county in KY is you're allowed to possess 12 cases of beer or 1 gallon of liquor for every person in the household who's of drinking age without getting in trouble for bootlegging. I'm sure the people who owned  County Line Liquors wasn't happy when Grant County went wet. It was the liquor store that was just over the Grant County line in Kenton county. The State stores in Cincinnati are also called Pony Kegs. State minimum pricing is what they all advertise. 

Pnut

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Liquor laws seem a poster child for "unintended consequences".  I remember when OSU used eminent domain to clean up the surrounding college town and replace the little mom&pop bars with chain stores.  So students instead of being in small groups with oversight would  buy kegs and throw keggers that often ended up burning couches in the street and OSU got on national news for bad student behavior multiple times!  I never could afford chain stores when I was first in college; but did use the used bookstores and used record stores and thrift stores that were "cleaned out" and thought OSU's use of  eminent domain was rather sketchy in the first place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

aaamax, man, ever since you posted this up it is all I have been thinking of. There is nothing tying me down here, and I could actually afford that place as well as the one here.  You say no residential, but a bed and breakfast would have to have a resident manager, right?  If I read the posting right it looks like it comes with around an acre of land. When you talked with the agent, did he mention any other restrictions? It appears to be part of a complex, so I was wondering if there were restrictions on the use of the surrounding property.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If my wife and I were 20 years younger we would be looking seriously at this.  Even now, there is some temptation and thoughts about a 2d/summer place.

Doc, if you get serious about this place all I can say is to do your due diligence and be realistic about everything.  If, after investigating everything it still looks like a go for you go for it but make sure it is an informed decision.  If you do go for it you may be getting us as guests at your B&B/shop.  We have been looking hard at a Scandinavia trip once it is safe/legal to travel again.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn't it be a BB&B? Blacksmith Bed & Breakfast? 

I could maybe talk Deb into a Scandinavian vacation if there were maybe spinners close by so we could both have playmates. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The folk school that this is part of teaches all kinds traditional crafts.  I am sure that these include various fiber crafts such as spinning and weaving.  Perhaps Deb could be a visiting instructor.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...