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I got this anvil from my grandpa. at the time I had no thought of ever actually using it, but here I am moving it to my shop years later.

It measures 38" to the tip of the horn & 6 1/2" wide, I can't make out much as far as markings go.

 

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Looks like a Hay Budden (just from the shape) made in Brooklyn NY. It's a very large anvil from a highly regarded manufacturer and in excellent shape. It is likely worth quite a lot of money and would make a really incredible user anvil! What you have there is not very common.

I don't see a face plate either so it is likely a solid steel upper-half Hay Budden, unless I'm just not seeing the face plate line.

This is a relevant video that talks about Hay Budden anvils. From the dimensions you gave, your anvil is even larger than this one.

Again that's quite an uncommon anvil, congratulations. Take good care of it and it should last a very, very long time.

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If you take a wire wheel with an angle grinder to the rust & crud, it may revel some identifying marks. Hay Budden's have the serial number located on the front foot under the horn and the weight under the logo, on the side with the horn to the right (second picture). It sure appears to be in outstanding shape and I hope you have read about not grinding, milling or welding on the hardened face. Doing any of that will do more harm than good.

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2 hours ago, Chelonian said:

Looks like a Hay Budden (just from the shape) made in Brooklyn NY. It's a very large anvil from a highly regarded manufacturer and in excellent shape. It is likely worth quite a lot of money and would make a really incredible user anvil! What you have there is not very common.

I don't see a face plate either so it is likely a solid steel upper-half Hay Budden, unless I'm just not seeing the face plate line.

This is a relevant video that talks about Hay Budden anvils. From the dimensions you gave, your anvil is even larger than this one.

Again that's quite an uncommon anvil, congratulations. Take good care of it and it should last a very, very long time.

Oh wow. I've had a bunch of different farriers offer me money for it over the years. I'm guessing they had some clue 

 

Thank you for all of the info, I'm going to clean it up and post some more photos tomorrow.

1 hour ago, Irondragon ForgeClay Works said:

If you take a wire wheel with an angle grinder to the rust & crud, it may revel some identifying marks. Hay Budden's have the serial number located on the front foot under the horn and the weight under the logo, on the side with the horn to the right (second picture). It sure appears to be in outstanding shape and I hope you have read about not grinding, milling or welding on the hardened face. Doing any of that will do more harm than good.

I'll be looking in those spots in the AM

Thank you for the tips as I'm very new to a lot of this.

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Just be sure when you clean it you do not use any thing more aggressive than a wire wheel (nothing abrasive). I know Irondragon mentioned this, but it's worth repeating.

Congratulations on such a nice anvil.

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Is that a weight stamp in the side down near the base in the curve?  If so it may be an earlier Trenton.  Have you ever demounted it and looked at the base?  HBs have an hourglass indentation and Trentons may have a HEAVY hour glass or caplet indentation.

Looks near mint condition and would definitely got for MORE than US$5 a pound out where I am.

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I found some marks after wire brushing. I can faintly see 4-0 below it, I assume that's the Weight

I can't seem to get a photo of the serial because it's barely there even after wire brushing but it appears to be 21525 there might be one more digit that I can't make out. 

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Yep, definitely a Hay Budden. 

Sometimes you can get a better view of an inscription by shining a light along the surface; the shadows in the low spots really stand out better. You can also give it a dusting of talc or flour to highlight the lettering as well.

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Thank you to all of you people that helped me with this. 

I'm pretty happy with the outcome and I can't wait to start using it 

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