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First, what is a Crescent end? Crescent is a company that makes tools. 

Seriously though, i would make them equal. That way you get the same leverage from both ends. 

Also, get a file and round the corners on the side of the jaws or they will bite into the hot metal when you use it. One more thing cut off that plasticy grippy stuff. Its going to melt. Not only possibly toxic but stinks to high heaven. 

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I would make the handles an even length. It will aid in twisting and be much easier to use and control.

 I'd have welded the handle on to the non moving jaw. 

Also I'd like to urge caution against welding to, or forging, things with chrome plating. Forging or welding chrome can produce hexavalent chrome which is really not good. Please look into this and use all the proper precautions and ppe. Best thing to do is avoid using chromed tools for this type of modification. There are plenty of old rusty unplated tools to be found at fleamarkets, yardsales, second hand shops, sometimes pawn shops, and other places. 

In rust we trust. 

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What BillyBones and Daswulf said. I would also start with one of the older adjustable wrenches whose jaws are perpendicular to the handle, so that it's easier to judge how far you've twisted: the handles will be parallel with at least two of the sides, and you don't have to compensate for the angle between the handle and the jaws.

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One way to judge length of handles is by placing a piece of test stock in your vise; then stand in front of it and twisting it. If you have to move your body to avoid the long side or work at arms reach it's too long!    Balanced length helps keep the work piece from bending to the side while twisting.

And why the heck is it welded to the moving jaw?  Can you show a picture off the net with another one done that way?  (Someone leading folks awry; or just a personal "oops"?)

For a small stock twisting wrench an old "Ford wrench", unplated can be used, the type that John shows are excellent but the larger ones are hard to use on small stock and generally have a wider jaw, helpful on big stuff but increases the flat length on your workpieces.

I have several sized twisting wrenches, my larger one I once twisted a RR spike on a bet with----COLD!  (6.5" solidly mounted post vise was used too.)

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3 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

And why the heck is it welded to the moving jaw?

I think it's mostly not knowing how a crescent type adjustable wrench works. How often do you see people turning bolts backwards with one, more often than not? You see videos of people twisting by pushing the wrench backwards as well.

As a general FYI. Turning with any adjustable wrench must have the heel jaw (Non moving) under compression and the adjustable jaw in tension. To get a mental image of what I mean, hold an adjustable wrench horizontally in front of you with the adjustable jaw on YOUR side of the wrench. When you pull on the handle the adjustable jaw's job is to hold the "thing" in place all the force is against the static (heel) jaw. 

If you were to push the forces against the adjustable jaw WILL shift it into the spaces in the adjustment screw and loosen it against the thing you're turning making it more likely to slip. 

Welding the second handle to the adjustable jaw WILL open the jaw making it slip. I twist with crescents when doing demos, not because it's a particularly good technique but it can be made to work and demonstrates a way to twist without vise or special wrenches. It's a demonstration of a work around. The right tool is always the better as is making the tool correctly.

Frosty The Lucky.

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41 minutes ago, Irondragon ForgeClay Works said:

a monkey wrench like JHCC or Ford wrench

To be perfectly clear: not a pipe wrench.

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I do use a small pipe wrench to straighten any twists on my rasptle snakes before I do the side winder bends.  Prior to that use I had only used them on plumbing in the house.

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Alrighty, lots of good input. Firstly, you were all totally correct about which side I welded it to. That evening I had been wandering my local Walmart and saw a ~$3 adjustable wrench and thought "I need something to twist with. I wonder if that chunk of rebar is still in the shed?" And away I went with a half thought through plan.

My first thought was the galvanized coating. I put on my PPE and ground the area I was planning on welding clean and the area around it. I figured I could worry about the rest later if this worked. I then spent half an hour or more learning that my welding area sucks and I need to do something about that at some point so I can hold my work where I need it. After fumbling with the wrench and steel for a while, I got it welded, snapped the picture, and went inside to post this thread before bed. Didn't get back to the garage till this weekend and when I did I looked at my wrench and realized exactly what y'all pointed out.

So, I hacked off the offending end, safely ground the opposite side, swore at my welding area for a while, and now have the wrench sitting in a vinegar bath for a day or so. I also cut the rebar to length,  removed the rubber material, and filed all the sharp edges as were suggested.

I agree also with using a nice monkey wrench (not pipe) but I have not seen one in a long time outside of full price online. I don't get out to sales like I used to since I went on overnights a couple years ago. However, I feel this one will work for me in the short term. I'm on the early end of the smithing learning curve so I have time to pick up better tools as they become available/essential.

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Safety first kids!

 

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The local tool crib carries monkey wrenches here, but boy howdy are they expensive. Even if you find them used they are usually labeled "antique" and are pricey. I got the Ford wrench from Fred Sanford. No clue as to the guys real name, but he runs a junk shop that reminds me of Sanford and Son. But i got the wrench and the measuring stick with it, a 3" Columbian bench vise, 2# cross pein, and a top fuller for i think about $30 if i remember corectly.

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You look good in purple.:) 

A twisting wrench isn't a precision tool you can just lay the pieces on a wooden surface and tack it up. A little of isn't a thing.

I've picked up all my monkey and similar adjustable wrenches at yard, garage, estate, etc. sales. Hard to find 24hr. yard sales though. I feel for you brother. 

On the  other hand twisting wrenches are easy to scratch make. A suitable bar, preferably flat stock, 3/8" x 1 1/2" or 2" works well. Drill a hole the size of the stock you wish to twist, say 1/2". Then using a square mark from the OD of the hole to the side of the bar and hack saw to the hole, a little file work to break the edges and smooth the cut and it's a done deal.  Hmmm?

Frosty The Lucky.

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Note that is NOT galvanized, most likely chrome and vinegar will not remove it! (Though it may encourage it to peel off depending on what the under layer is...)

Back when the fleamarkets were open; I would pick up a couple of "ford wrenches" a year for a US dollar or so---got one cheap as the moving jaw had broken off at the end---as I have problems getting students to set the wrench deep on the workpiece to twist. I had a friend grind both ends to the same size to make a shallower wrench for student use. (As it was "broken" I think I got it for a quarter...)  The larger monkey wrenches will sometimes run me US$5 and I'll go to $10 for huge ones...

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I picked this up at the TSC i think for about $8 or so. A little more than $3, but it is just painted and the jawed part on the bottom (can not remember what that style is called) is surprisingly handy. I have used it more times than i thought i would. 

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Yeah, I am hoping that letting it set in the vinegar for a week will weaken the underlayer enough to scrub it off. If not I am moving onto a stronger acid! I'm not too worried since any spot that will touch hot steel at this point have been ground or filed clean.

I was looking into making one of those traditional two-size twisting wrenches as well, if for no other reason than for something fun to make.

I wish I had visited TSC, that wrench would have been a lot easier to make "safe". Although, I looked on Amazon and found the ford wrenches for 20-30 bucks. Might buy one if this one doesn't work as well as I would like.

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I've never paid more than a couple of dollars at a fleamarket, yard sale or junk store for a ford wrench.  Online is usually the MOST expensive way to buy something for blacksmithing!  (And that price was in: Ohio, NM, Arkansas, OK...)

Hot metal won't mess up the chrome in normal use, but welding will and strong acids will make a TOXIC brew that is hard to get rid of safely!!!

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That's true. Probably will just let it be then. Welding is all done and I don't want to deal with a hazmat incident this month. 

Buying a ford wrench online is likely not going to happen, since I can make due with this wrench and maybe make a few sizes of the traditional style ones. My wife is still on a day-walker schedule so maybe I will give her a picture of a ford wrench this spring and summer to do hunting while at sales and such. Assuming the plague doesn't keep everything closed for another season.

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It's done, no reason to redo it. It may not be the best but it'll work, it ain't broke.:) Just keep your eyes open hit garage, yard, etc. sales when things open up again and you have the opportunity, monkey and versions of Ford type wrenches are out there sometimes just to get off the table. I have a couple I "had" to take to buy what I wanted, it was late Sunday and the guy didn't want to pack stuff home, I even got the card table.  The steel cart the NARB forge lives on was part of an all or nothing yard sale buy. 

It really helps to be a likeable story teller guy, being a blacksmith really opens doors to deals. Sometimes it does the opposite but not always. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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