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Can a cable be forged with a hose clamp securing it?


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  • Glenn changed the title to Can a cable be forged with a hose clamp securing it?

Maybe? I imagine those are galvanized so remove the zinc in a vinegar bath first.

I feel like people will often open the cable up (while hot), flux, then close it back up. I also think a bottom swage sized correctly for the cable will keep it from fraying out while welding. Might work better than a hose clamp. Either way it's worth a shot. 

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Most hose clamps are chrome plated and you do NOT want putting chrome in your forge, it's extremely toxic. do it often enough and it WILL give you cancer, if you live long enough. It's not as toxic as cadmium but it's in the same realm.

You can wrap the ends in mechanic's wire like you would rope. Its called "Whipping," Do it before you cut the cable and cut through the whip or very close. There is a way to lock the wrap so it won't unravel on you but I'm not going to try explaining it. Google whipping rope will be much more clear. 

Oh okay, one way to lock whipping is the same way as tying a "blood knot," (search fishing knots) or the very similar "hangman's noose." 

Anyway, using a hose clamp makes intuitive sense but it's a serious breathing hazard.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I neither wrap nor preweld the ends of cable. What I do is very carefully trap (as if I was using a swage) the ends of the cable in a step of the anvil (if the anvil has one), or the corner where it drops off on my nimba, or the slight drop on a kanca. Some way to keep the end from splaying apart. I have made a step tool for my nimba by taking 1" square stock setting it down in the hardy hole, bending it over. I then radiused a bunch of different edges and fullers into the top part. I use it for fullering, as a hold fast, as a step, and for trapping material against it. So if you don't have a step in your anvil but do have a hardy that'll help. Make sure to set the initial weld carefully, then once you've got it you can start using more force.

 

 

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I agree that most all hoseclamps I see are some sort of stainless other than the screw often times is steel. I feel it might not hold up well at forgewelding heat but who knows, if bailing wire works then...

Personally I weld the end but then I have a welder so...

I start with getting the end forge welded, brushing, retwisting in the vise to keep it tight, and reflux for about every heat till it is welded. 

I kind of feel like the hose clamp might not survive or hold tight for long if even one welding heat. Long as it isnt chrome plated, worst it can do is not work out I think. 

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I use bailing wire and roll it in the direction that naturally tightens up the twist.

If i did this often i'd do it the same way but do it in a half round fuller or my swage block.

A tack weld on the ends works too, but i always roll it as i said above when welding it.

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I would not use one of the standard hose clamps like at the car parts store. I think like Das says they just will not hold up under welding heat. I would either look at the local scrap yard, lift some hood on cars, or contact the local GM* or Toyota* dealer to get the spring type clamps. You know the ones that need the special pair of pliers to open. They are much thicker than the band style, do not rely on a screw to secure, and being springy may just be made of a decent steel that can be hardened. 

Frosty, you are not entirely wrong. They do make chrome plated hose clamps. They are usually stamped "chrome" on them. You will also find them in these engine dress up kits. 

*Not advocating for GM or Toyota, those are the only 2 makes that use that style i can think of off the top of my head before my first cup of coffee. 

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Just regular run of the mill hose clamps from the parts store seem to work ok.  Even at welding heat. They only need to hold until the weld is set, Same with baling wire. 

  Here they are being used for a pattern welded billet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFw40WOP3s8

I cannot attest to whether her technique, or procedure is right, wrong, indifferent, or otherwise, but the clamps seem to do well.

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