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So I want to do some bending in 1/2” round stock but I want to really localize the heat for tight bends. With the holidays coming the budget is super tight...I know the small HD propane torch won’t get 1/2 hot enough so instead of buying a bigger better torch kit could I not use the parts from my propane forge? If I take the burner out of the forge it’s kind of like a torch with no handle but I can manage to find something to hold it with..I’m brand new to forging so I’m not going to be surprised if someone says this is a completely stupid dangerous idea for some reason lol...let me know. My forge is basically the same as the 1 burner forge in the top of the pic. Thanks. 

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Nothing inherently dangerous in running a burner outside of the forge.  Also keep in mind that if it's mild steel you can quench around the heated section to further isolate the heat.

Another option is using a second torch.

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You could heat it in the forge like said above and just quench the ends and leave it hot where you want the bend. It would probably be easier than taking the burners off. They might not burn the same outside of the forge as they do in it. 

Pnut

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Yeah I do use the selective cooling from quenching some times but I have a VERY budget friendly vise so I’m always struggling to quench where needed and then get it set up correctly in the vise before it’s cooled too much. In the long run I just need a better vise but for now I’d like to have it set up perfectly and then apply the heat where I need it. 

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One of the guys in our state group makes and sells 3/4" burners. Along with the burners comes a 1" flared fitting that fits over the end of the burner and is held in place with a setscrew. In demos he sets the whole thing up in a clamp stand he made, and does exactly what you are hoping to do. The flared fitting is adjustable with the set screw for dialing in your flame. I recall the flare is about 2" long.

Steve

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Make a set of bending forks and a scrolling wrench. Make the opening in both about a 16th or so over half.

Clamp the forks in your vice and bend with the wrench.

It won't matter how long of a heat you have. 

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On 11/18/2020 at 9:34 AM, pnut said:

You could heat it in the forge like said above and just quench the ends and leave it hot where you want the bend. It would probably be easier than taking the burners off. They might not burn the same outside of the forge as they do in it. 

Pnut

Pnut- you were right. The burner did not burn the same outside of the forge. Would barely light if the choke was open even a little and with it almost completely closed it was just more of an open flame. Had to just go at it at the anvil. Definitely could have been better but for my fourth project ever I’m pretty happy with it. Those are not the screws I’m going to use by the way lol. Just test assembly. 
what kind of screws would you guys use? I know I can strip the zinc ones with vinegar then heat and wax to match the rest which I might do but curios to see what you guys say...The holes aren’t countersunk 

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I meant to add the video not the picture

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Depends on the load: unplated drywall screws are nice and dark for moderate loads. Larger loads: Get non-plated small lag screws and fill a V in each side  >   < (2side example) to dress them up.

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I use either square headed lags or straight slot round headed screws. You can find them black at Fastenal. They fit my idea of that "traditional blacksmith" look.

I also like to square up and decorate the heads of hex headed screws and lags for my fasteners.

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If I remember right, Ospho is a solution of phosphoric acid and it converts rust into Iron Phosphate (I think) which makes a hard protective and black coating.  We sold it for rust prep for painting when I worked at Sherwin Williams.

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Yes, Ospho is one of a number of phosphoric acid rust to iron products as is Naval Jelly, both have surfacants to make sure the acid stays in full contact with the rustyness. I didn't name a product earlier, mostly because I don't know if it'll take a polish and remain black. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Have no idea about polish.  I always thought of it in terms of surface prep for painting, not as a final finish.  I suppose there is no reason why a clear coat would not adhere once the solvent was washed off.  If the bolts are not rusted though, the ospho shouldn't change their color much.  I believe it will etch the metal making it ready for a coating.  T'were me, I'd just paint the screws with enamel, sand, then clearcoat with as low a gloss polyurethane as I could find.  Maybe treat the other metal with Ospho if there was any other rust to contend with.

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The problem with using OSPHO or something similar is it gains the most color by converting the rust.  So if you could get a solid coat of consistent rust all the way around the piece in question, it would maintain that black appearance under a clear coat.   In reality it will be splotchy as I have never seen a piece of steel rust uniformly.  some areas would be darker as they held more rust.   Its also not meant to be a top coat and will wash and dissolve over time.  Other coat and soak options would probably be much better, although I haven't ever tried any of them. We just paint over any ospho or convertant we use. 

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So I know I'm a little late to this thread, but I make dinner triangles like the one you showed and I bend the 1/2 in round stock cold.  I made a bending fork out of an old adjustable pipe wrench, and a jig I made up based on somebody else's design somewhere here on the forums (man these forums are big!).  It took a little bit of effort to set up, but bending it cold beats having to tear down your forge every time you want to make a dinner bell !!

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