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Frazer's Corner of the Internet [photo heavy]


Frazer

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Well, it's painted. I won't bother adding additional pictures since it's the same as seen above, only black. I did end up using the Rustoleum engine enamel spray paint (as usual, thank you both for the help). While hot pink might have been an eye catching option, black seemed to be the way to go.

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I did clay the firepan today. I did what seemed logical, but I'm just going to check to make sure I did it correctly.

IMG_2021-05-25_19-42-31.jpeg.41640d72c4ebb62206bbb383694ea140.jpeg

It's a ~3:1 mix of sand and naturally harvested, sustainably sourced, gluten free, Rochestarian clay. Tamped down with a rock for good measure. 

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Inventive? Thousands of years of technological advancement on hammers and the blacksmith grabs a rock.  AYUP a properly blacksmitherly solution alright. ;)

Nice job Frazer, seriously well done.

Frosty The Lucky.

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TP, very true. That's half the fun, right?

Jennifer, very soon. I'm (mostly) packing up today and the chimney is going in on Friday. Then I'll have one more day to finish packing and will be moving on Sunday.

IDFCW/Frosty, in this case I'm going to substitute the word inventive with practical. When all you need to do is flatten something a rock will do just fine. Are there more elegant solutions? Probably, but I have a surplus of rocks! :D

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I see a lot of folks getting into the craft that have not spent much time tinkering with stuff to get it to work.  They often assume there is ONE way to do something and as soon as they learn that they will be experts at it.  (As an example: back in the days of the "Junkyard Hammer";  some folks wanted to know exactly what the engine block came from so they could duplicate it exactly!  When the idea was to use what you could find locally cheap!)

Folks who will spend hundreds of hours playing a video game to figure out how to win; but want the *one* *true* *way* to forge something and expect they will do it perfectly the first time.

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I've always been a tinkerer. I think that's  part of the reason why I've enjoyed blacksmithing so much. Everything is a work in process.. Especially when you're still relatively new like me. While reinventing the wheel isn't necessary, there are many different approaches to the same problem.

In the same breath, initial decisions/approaches do have a certain inertia to them since I often fall victim to the "I'll get around to fixing it" mentality. Then I'll finally make the change and kick myself for not doing it sooner.. Ah well, I'll get around to fixing that too... one of these days :rolleyes:

MJ, I'm sorry I don't fully understand your statement and/or question.. it's probably just a typo.

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Congrats..   for myself the most important aspect is the fire blower off transition to blower on..  Just before the fire heat continues up the stack..  That dead time in between is crucial.. 

Looks great. What did you end up using for stack pipe? 

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Jennifer, I'm sure I'll get to test that soon. I don't want to light it up for real until after the fire marshal's final inspection. Technically I could according to the guys who installed it, but I don't want to rock the boat. I've waited this long.. I think I can hold off for a few more days.

The stack is a 10" DuraTech system. Galvalume up to the roof penetration and SS after that. Unfortunately, one of the 3' pieces arrived damaged so the stack (at this point) is only 11' long. The bottom of the cap is still 46" above the peak of the roof, which is good. The guys told me to let them know if I have any performance issues due the missing piece and they will order a replacement. At this point I haven't been charged for that piece. 

Even if the performance isn't affected I'll probably end up getting that piece put in just to keep the smoke up higher. That way it's less likely to reenter through the ridge vent/get blown down the roof toward my house and/or my westerly neighbors house. They can stop by some afternoon and pop it on in ~15 minutes. EZPZ.

Frosty, indeed! It's quite the chimney. The 12" (OD) pipe looks funny coming out the back of that little building. At least my house will be easy to spot!

My neighbor to the east (an older gentleman) came out to investigate. I told him a few weeks ago what was going on, but I guess he forgot.. once his initial concerns were abated he seemed to think it was cool and wanted a quote for me to make him a railing for his front steps :rolleyes:

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Smoke stack marketing! If taller turns out to be better I have to wonder how tall you can make it according to code. You could budget a portion of the profits for smoke stack enhancement! 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty most codes deal with minimum heights vs maximum..  Here it is 2ft rise over the peak within 10ft of the peak.. 

The largest or most repeated saying in all the literature I have read from the different pipe mfgs is to run the stack inside the building vs outside. 
 

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Frazer and I were joking around a bit about the tall shiny stack sticking out of his little shop attracting a neighbor to find out what was going on. And after visiting and talking asked for a quote on a porch railing. 

My quip was regarding using a really tall shiny smoke stack as long distance advertising. Max height codes don't come into play until we're talking radio tower height or controlled air space. :rolleyes:

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty, the phrase "to the moon!" has gained some traction in the last several months. I wonder if Mr. Musk would be willing to send up the last few pieces the next time he's up that way.. 

I don't know if controlled air space laws apply when you're looking to set the record for "sucky"-est chimney.

Ah, I can see the headline now... "Rochester youth accidentally drawn into space after chimney mishap"

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My two favorite descriptions of a powerful draft are "It sucked the hammer right out of my hand, and it landed in the neighbor's yard!" and "It pulled the fillings right out of my teeth!"

The Bert and I story "The Stove with the Powerful Draft" is also a lot of fun.

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I had my first test run of the forge yesterday. The hood seems to be working great! However, I was having some trouble trying to heat up the middle of the long piece of rebar I was trying to bend. I wish they had left a cut out in the front/back of the pan for long stock to pass through. Looks like I'll be adding some additional dirt/clay.

 

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