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Manageable Fix for a newb? Beautiful door straps


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The porch was indeed added in the early 1900's.  We hate it and plan on ripping it off and putting a larger expansion on the home at some point.  Just need to plan carefully so that we can do it right.

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You already know this; but look at how additions were done in your area in that period.  Very common to start small and add more house as income and family increased!  If you follow the common addition styles your house will look even more like an original!

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You are right! Sometimes we see the way people put these additions on and it ruins the house when other times it looks like it was built that way originally. I think when it comes time we might hire an engineer who specializes in old homes.

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Start taking pictures when you see old houses with additions you like.  Common where I have lived is the original farm house with chimney on end morphing to another side added on the chimney end and the chimney now much larger as it has fire places on each side. Then a wing going back from one side followed by a wing going back from the other side.  Then the grandparents house added out back a ways.

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The farmhouse was a long, low building, two-storied in parts. Other parts of it were three-storied. Edward the Sixth had originally owned it in the form of a shed in which he housed his swineherd, but he had gown tired of it and had it rebuilt in Sussex clay. Then he pulled it down. Elizabeth had rebuilt it, with a good many chimneys in one way and another.

The Charleses had let it alone.; but William and Mary had pulled it down again, and George the First had rebuilt it. George the Second however burned it down. George the Third added another wing. George the Fourth pulled it down again.

By the time England began to develop that magnificent flowering of trade and imperial expansion that fell to her lot under Victoria, there was not much of the original building left, save the tradition that it had always been there. It crouched, like a beast about to spring, under the brow of Mockuncle Hill. Like ghosts embedded in brick and stone, the architectural variations of each period through which it passed were mute history. It was known locally as "The Kings Whim".

The front door of the farm faced a perfectly inaccessible ploughed field at the back of the house; it had been the whim of Red Raleigh Starkadder, in 1835, to have it so; and so the family always used to come in by the back door, which abutted the general yard facing the cowsheds. A long corridor ran half-way through the house on the second storey and then stopped. One could not get into the attics at all. It was all very awkward.

 

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Actually there is a quote in the film speculating on other possible locations.  We re-watched it recently as part of our CV-19 cheer-up film festival.

My wife would like a woodshed; we just bought our winter's wood. 1 cord should handle things nicely when our thermonuclear furnace is on the fritz. I expect I'll sweep the chimney this weekend.

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ThomasPowers and I are both big fans of the comic novel Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons, later filmed as a television movie by the BBC and released in some theaters in the US.

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Written in the 1930's as a parody of all the bucolic/rustic books coming out around then.  A sophisticated city relation who has just lost her parents comes to live at Cold Comfort Farm which is inhabited by the Doomed Starkadders. She decides to make changes for the better.

Made into a film in the 1990's.  If you are not much into such humour---avoid it!  If you get some of the in jokes in British books seek it out!

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nice set of hardware. howabout a sideview of the thumber?

I've certainly used old motor oil hot for a finish. It does look good. However once  i tamed the blo, turp, and beeswax beast, i never went back. It is a black heat, not a blue heat. If the color you mentioned is blue, thats in the tempering range, and too cool. Basically the tempering colors go from a light straw thru blue to purple then black. Thus begins the black heat range. This continues till you hit a dull red.

However, its great to see you preservered and found a solution. Congrats.

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