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What did you do in the shop today?


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ok an SOS  here i made charcoal today and it went good except when I went to shut it down the barrel was bent and there are air gaps so the fire continues to oxidize i have lost about half my initial crop please help me what should i do can i pour water on and then dry the fuel out later or what do you recommend

help...

M.J.Lampert

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Good Morning,

Close it up as tight as you can. If it is still burning too hot, help it cool down with a little water. Let is sit afterwards to dry out naturally.

In our copy of a Whitlox Forge, we add pieces of wood as we are forging. It is charcoaling in place, we get lots of heat with the wood and charcoal.

Neil

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Finally got time to go down and finish my bench. The top is 19mm ply with a 2mm steel skin, frame is all 40mm box, the tool shelf is mesh so if anything drops under it I should be able to see it. 

The second photo is 1 upright from a small steel rack I threw together. 

Now all I need is a couple of big lads to help me get it in place, my forge is in a 10 foot storage container on top of a 40 foot container and I need to get the anvil out before I can get the bench in. 

Hopefully next Saturdays project. 

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On 10/8/2021 at 5:52 PM, Gandalfgreen said:

Frosty enough ammo 

Nah, what gave me "ammo" was I did almost exactly the same thing and not just the first time I used it. The NARB forge I use now has a floor the bows UP because I didn't give it enough time to set hard. The first time I used KOL I wasted a bunch because I mixed up more than I could use. 

And YES, KOL will stick to its set or cured itself, no problem.

Another beautiful chandelier Alex. The Morocan light fixtures make me wish I had a long hallway to line with them as sconces and flickering LED bulbs. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Just finished up a leafing stake i started yesterday, 

Yesterday I flattened it out and used a hot cut hardy to split it, but i didn’t really like how it looked, an I tried to rework it and that just made it worse so I cut it off an started over,

this time I upset it first and then I used a handled hot cut to make the split, 

also I made four s hooks from leftover bars from a failed basket weave forge weld, an used them to hang forge tools

It was really weird spending two days working with 3/4” sucker rod and then working with 1/4” mild lol, 567916D2-F690-401E-9822-F2102BCB4E29.thumb.jpeg.211fb318a0f157fc9ffd4270a7f8e0c2.jpeg

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Didn’t forge today. After church and leftover quail from yesterday, I went for a walk around outside to make sure everything which should be secure is secure. Most of the state is in a severe Tornado Watch.

It felt spooky out. Not even the barest trace of a breeze. Sun out. Not hardly any clouds. The last time all the meteorologists were freaking like this was the day before the tornado took out an elementary school and our Norman Regional Moore hospital in Moore.   It is times like this that I almost wish I had cable. 
 

Jeez!  Is there anything you do not have? (Prompted by the background objects)

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Irondragon,

I’m actually out here right now battening down the hatches, shutting up stuff, picking up stuff, covering up ect…. Getting ready for the storm tonight, 

I don’t know about y’all over there but it’s been nonstop windy out here all day, so I figure it’s moving slowly this way, 

as far as the lean to, I plan on building a 20x20 lean to and I’m gonna wall up the west side to help break the wind, 

but I’ve got a lot of work to do out here first, I gotta bust out a concrete ramp an fight my way through a bunch of wisteria vines and roots and finish cleaning off the pad first, 

An when I get all that done I’ll have to scavenge up some high line poles or old chicken house steel trusses, because it will be a cold day in the forge before I pay current lumber prices lol, 

I already have a couple trailer loads of salvage sheet metal in pretty good shape for the roof and enough crappy sheet metal to wall in the west side for the wind break, 

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I agree. Just take some of that corrugated roofing material you must have stacked around somewhere and some of the posts and 2x4s and do a lean-to. 


I actually prefer my open space. It isn’t so great in the afternoons in the summer, but in the fall and winter it is shady most days. It is just past the drip line of a huge oak in the back corner of my yard, so it is shady year round until about 1400. In the fall and winter, the afternoon sun is blocked by a line of oaks in my neighbors yard. In the afternoon during the summer, I have to poke what I am working on under the forge to see the color, but that isn’t a problem really, because it is too hot to be out there anyway. 

What I wish I had was something other than dirt to work on.  It is a mud pit after it rains and moving around in the same spot day after day, I wear a hollow where I am working.  Some day I plan to brick it.  I have a small pile of bricks I have been collecting for it.  Once I have a large pile, I will prepare the ground and place them. 

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DHarris, ive had customers come through the shop that were truck drivers and some of them work for a concrete an material company, they have offered to swing by an dump the leftovers out of their concrete trucks in between their runs, all I would have to do is make the dirt pad an frame it an they'd dump a little at a time, 

maybe that’s a way you could get a small pad poured?
Just make friends with a concrete driver and then forge them something nice an toss in a 30 pack of the cheap stuff an before you know it you’ll have concrete under your forge!  lol

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thanks for the advice i got a 5 gallon bucket saved now to dry it with the temperatures often dropping below freezing at night oh well at least i know it works just need a better barrel 

also hoping for a good thanksgiving for the rest of you 

M.J.Lampert

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6 hours ago, DHarris said:

I wish I had was something other than dirt to work on.  

Dig the hole out a bit and add rock or crushed stone.  Mix the dirt with a little concrete or cement and fill in the voids.  Allow it to set up on its own, locking everything in place. Think of it as a wear surface.

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2nd commission finished!

This is for my scouts group, as we lost the last dutch oven lid lifter somewhere. Not a paid commission, but still nice forge stuff for other people.

I got the idea from this design from the iForge.

The feet were forge welded, next time I do have to weld them further shut, as I think the stress riser at the bend might cause the whole thing to fail, but time will tell.

IMG_20211011_132213.thumb.jpg.702f0773ce8bae1342f3ce2690149b68.jpgIMG_20211011_132222.thumb.jpg.955f7e139e4734c91ae506217b222bea.jpgIMG_20211011_132230.thumb.jpg.dbc0f593c7d457e0d5ea013c86cda916.jpg

~Jobtiel

 

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Just windy here; storm's due tomorrow---however I noticed that there was frost on the roof of my pickup this morning---wasn't supposed to get that cold but the radiation into space helps it cool a lot up here in the high and dry.  Note that bad weather can generate truncated utility poles and hail dimpled sheet metal roofing for reuse.

BillyBones:  perhaps a Falcata?   (besides falchions there are also grosse messers).

Saturday I snuck a quick trip to the scrapyard before going to Albuquerque to see half the grandkids: Claw hammer head, ball peen hammer head, Large "car shaker" speaker magnet, leaf rake head, 3/8" rod and some other small stuff.

Sunday after church  I fired up the coal forge the first time in months---need to start making the barbwire basket Christmas tree icicles and I like to weld them in coal as the OLD rusty barbwire is fairly fragile.   No problem welding; but I need to go scrounge more barbwire! Boy will I be happy when I have lights in the shop!

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A Dutch oven is a lidded cast iron pot, often with feet and a raised lip on the top. The feet allow it to be put on or next to a campfire, and the lip allows hot coals to be piled on top to heat from all sides. Because the whole thing gets pretty hot, the special lifter allows the cook to remove the lid without having to remove it from the fire.

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5 hours ago, Jobtiel1 said:

The feet were forge welded, next time I do have to weld them further shut, as I think the stress riser at the bend might cause the whole thing to fail, but time will tell.

Looks cool and perfectly functional. I see what you mean about possible failure at some point, which is not something you would want to happen with that sort of thing while it is in use.

I’ve made one, but it was made as a “trade item” for a SCABA meeting a few years ago, so I can’t take a picture of it.  I made it without any welds.  My inspiration was a Ping Craz-E putter head.  They are big and monstrous things, but they will stand upright on their own.

I still have the lid-lifter I drew in the trade.  I forget the maker’s name, but he is a very good blacksmith.  I will take a picture and post it along with his name.

 

Below is Mandell Greteman, our current club president.  I don’t know if the lid-lifter he is using was one he made, but it probably is.  He has a very well equipped shop.  The picture is of him checking on the cobbler he was cooking at a meeting.  He cooks pretty good. 

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Since there are hot coals and ashes on top the lid; your lid lifter should keep the lid from tipping and spilling them into the food.  "Dutch Ovens" are used for campfire cooking nowadays but were once part of down hearth cooking for places that didn't have a brick oven to cook in.

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I was thinking about using the bended variant as shown in this picture: 

Darin-York-Lid-Lifter.jpg.8e2024e397a51bc29067db227d176a75.jpg

However, I wanted to to practice forge welding. The legs are completely welded together without seams so I don't think the weld will open up, but for the next one it will look better if the rest is welded up too.

Indeed we use the Dutch ovens a lot to cook on campfires, and we use it occasionally to bake bread and other things with hot coals.

~Jobtiel

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