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What did you do in the shop today?


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Finished up the last couple of leaves my wife requested as small gifts at a scouting event. Not super happy with them, but not to bad with the limited forge time I’ve had since last year. It’s good to have my forge done (well at least close enough to use…)DA1C5208-C45A-48D6-BFE6-9F6143B0C6FA.jpeg.3bb83fdb5b3a1c4743138f9b2a8525b8.jpeg

First couple were made Saturday at our hammer-in and I was working with 1/2” square, others done in my forge with 3/8” Square.

Also, tried my hand at forge brazing tonight. Had a cold shunt on one leaf near the base of the stem that ended up cracking 3/4” across the stem. So, I  used some flux and piece of small diameter brass pin stock. Heated the leaf till the a dull red with the flux around the crack and touched the brass to it in the forge. It actually worked and seemed pretty strong. That is until I couldn’t get the flux wire brushed off and put it back in the heat to soften the flux, to make it easier to clean it up. It resulted in me just brushing the leaf from the stem. I guess the brass softened more the the flux…

David

 

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5 hours ago, Dewnmoutain said:

Just cannot seem to hammer the spade shape just right. 

That's a leaf shape, "concave" to an acute point. Spades are convex to an obtuse "point." see pic below.

You're getting there it's in the practice. As John says, getting the preform right makes it much easier. 

What steps are you following? 

David: Most brazing and forge fluxes are water soluble, next time just warm it up and drop it in water. It may take a while but it'll work where brushing doesn't.

Frosty The Lucky.

Burgon and Ball Ladies Groundbreaker Spade - Harrod Horticultural

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Started work on a small axe today!

Started with forging the slot punch and drift for the eye. However, I quenched the drift in water during drifting the eye, and it was made from leaf spring, now there's a big crack, so I made a new one.

This is what I got so far.

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Next time I'll finish chiselling the slit for the steel bit. And start forging the blade.

~Jobtiel

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Goods, I really like those leaves! 
Jobtie1, I can’t wait to see your progress! 

today I started forging a new hotdog/ marshmallow roasting fork, and this time I didn’t cheat with the angle grinder and cutting wheel, I started with a 4’ piece of 3/8” mild steel, and I followed yalls advice and flattened it out first before using a hot cut hardy, and that worked so much better than the last two times I tried, I made the tines and started work on squaring up the shaft before I had a blower break down that stopped me for the afternoon till I got it back up an running, I posted all of that on another thread though, anyways I’m very happy with how it’s going so far and this time no power tools so that makes me even happier! 18D53DAF-F288-4D6F-8050-65D385BB2017.thumb.jpeg.d8c94b0113abfd07cd9a4f9c6b4fdfe1.jpeg

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Worked my first blacksmithing public demo today at a “living history” event in Hillsboro, NH. Made some  S hooks, nails, and a gate latch. It went very well. I was surprised by the intent interest of children- I didn’t expect this. My workshop instructor had recommended me for this event. I initially felt that I did not have enough experience, but after encouragement I decided to do it. If you get the opportunity to do a demo, I recommend that you give it a try. It was a fun event.

bob

 

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PHDforge, I love doing demos, and kids are the greatest parts. They soak everything up. Honestly, I think the they get more from it that 90% of the adults! I end up giving most of the small items I make at the demos to the kids. Just makes my day seeing them so interested and seeing their expressions when I had the items over!

I believe my demo for next week is cancelled, that county is in the red for COVID19. (I believe it’s the 1st time for that country since the ranking came out…) I was really looking forward to it, and the even in October is at risk also. Oh well, there’s always next year.

David

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NICE toasting fork TW! One suggestion is to use a rounded chisel or purpose made "fuller" chisel vertically in the slot to round the chisel cut. It doesn't need to be anything fancy, just round, in a pinch you can flatten a piece of your 3/8" rnd with a couple whacks and strike it laid it on edge in the heated cut. All you want to do is smooth and round the raggedy chisel cut where it transitions into the shaft. 

I highly recommend new guys do demos. You'll learn more explaining what and why you're doing what you're doing than listening to an instructor. And YES kids are THE magic at demos. Kids are fascinated by fire, hot steel and being able to handle and work it. They ask THE best questions and make THE BEST observations. Their questions and observations are unpolluted by knowledge. 

When adults prove themselves wrong opining about things they "learned" watching TV the kids having a better grasp of what's going on and why instantly become your champions.

Believe me simple hooks and nails are perfect demo products and the kids are your reward. Honest, no fooling, give it a try.

Be VERY CAREFUL about activities that throw slag or hot bits, kids faces (EYES!) are at anvil level. NO WELDING at demos unless you're behind a good shield if you must stand between the anvil and the audience. A weld can throw molten borax 30' and it makes 4th degree burns on bare flesh. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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15 hours ago, JHCC said:

Hanging out with guys doing demos is how I got started as a kid. 

Very often I wish it hadn’t taken me till I was 31 to find this craft I enjoy so much. We got hit with a storm this weekend so I didn’t get any actual forge time in. I’m really enjoying welding though so I made this removable  swivel shelf for tool holding at the anvil which I’m convinced you can just never have enough of. I got the idea from Black Bear Forge on YouTube - John’s is much better though. Video is only 12 seconds but it doesn’t seem to want to load. And I got the picture put in this frame so it’s finally finished. Not happy with the fit and finish of the picture but it will have to do. There’s a huge gap on the one side because of the vine but I knew if I started cutting I’d just made it look more sloppy. Looks ok from straight on. Blurred faces since I didn’t ask permission to post their picture lol. 
 

 

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Goods and Frosty, in Mark Asprey’s first book he shows a chisel with one of the side edges with a radius or fuller and the other side sharp, seems like a good tool to have and would work well for the fork. I haven’t had a chance to make one yet. My first fork I had punched a hole at the base for the radius  before chiseling the split.

demos: I did do some research before attempting it. IFI had some good info.  I had read forge welding should be avoided due to the spray of flux. (I am not that good at welding anyway). I had also read that short small projects are best because people don’t stay too long and cycle by through your area. Twisting seems to be the biggest hit.

I just finished the second day, which was shortened a bit due to Tropical storm Henri impacting my area (mostly heavy rain).

I highly recommend doing a demo. 

The only drawback, don’t bring too many heavy pieces of equipment or too many tools. Travel light!

Bob

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Too hot today to work for very long, but I started a pair of tongs (with which I am, naturally, almost entirely unhappy) and cut a spoon swage into the underside of the ASO I use for an upsetting block.

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2 hours ago, Pat Masterson said:

Very often I wish it hadn’t taken me till I was 31 to find this craft I enjoy so much.

Don’t worry about that too much. I’m glad I started out when I was young and that I got some really good instruction when I first started. However, I feel that I have learned a huge amount  and advanced my skills immeasurably in the five or six years since I restarted, after a few decades’ lapse.

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JHCC, I appreciated your  idea for using an ASO as an upsetting block on the floor and have since move one of mine to right in front of the forge and is it that way the other day. I worked out pretty good!

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On the topic of short small projects for a demo, a fire striker like this from some coil spring might be cool too:

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I think that the part where you upset the rounded part into the body of the striker to make a square corner might be pretty interesting to perform and explain. Show the before and after of some onlookers.

~Jobtiel

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Fired up yesterday for the first time in weeks, the staples in my head incident is responsible for a lot of that!  Good to be back at the forge though. I was working on a dragon scale twist and needed something to hold my work piece on the 45 deg.  Decided I wasn't recovered enough to move the 150# swage block around so looked through my tools and found a top swage used to dress star drills, I actually found two and the huge one would take the 1/2" sq stock nicely and I could even use the cross channel + to chisel in and not run into the sides.

Today my wife removed the staple that had been poorly installed and I may end up with her removing the others since the Dr's office never called back about their removal.

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haven't been in the shop for the last while and wont be for the next month and a half as I am going wrangling for a hunting outfitter will start a thread in everything-else to post pics in

on that note what do y'all recommend for hiking boots i destroyed my last pair and was very unhappy with them (the soles where to hard and i slipped on damp rocks

tp happy your OK

M.J.Lampert

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