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What did you do in the shop today?


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21 minutes ago, pnut said:

I'm worried about someone breaking into it and making off with everything. 

That just made me think of how an improvised anvil is much safer from thieves than a london pattern anvil. An anvil in disguise. Tho the bigger, the more a scrap thief might want it anyway. Who would bother trying to take a stump with a sledgehammer head stuck in it. 

Pat, one way would be to get a piece of pipe a little undersized to the diameter ring you want to turn. You can then drill a hole the diameter of the rod you are bending in the lower section of the pipe and insert and bend it around cold if you can. Or you could clamp the end of the stock to the pipe and bend it.  You dont necessarily need pipe. A branch or log the right diameter would work. 

There are fancier ways to build one as well.  Depending on the thickness of the stock you might need a piece of pipe to slide over the stock to help you bend it. 

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The trick is to get a "one mile anvil": that is, one that weighs 5,280 lbs. They'd need a fairly large crane to get away with that! Upon further investigation, JD Napiers 6500lb anvil would also suffice.

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Yup, you could go so big that they wouldn't be able to get away with it without being noticed. 

 

Here's a video that popped up in my YouTube feed a little while back. I thought it was a clever and simple setup. He could be a little safer with the cutoff wheel tho. 

 

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Here's another video of a homemade ring bender made from some pipe, some ball bearings, some angle iron, and a couple of other bits and pieces. I can see a couple of things that I myself would probably do differently, but you might find it inspirational.

 

 

2 hours ago, Gandalfgreen said:

I have to be picky too not much room for storage

This is actually a very good thing, as it forces you to be more selective in what you bring home. The temptation is to salvage EVERYTHING, even the stuff that you don't need or can't use, and that eats up both storage space and spousal patience.

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  Here is a photo I got off the net of one similar in design to what I made.  Mine was a bit "cruder".   :) I have no picture of the one I built to my regret.  It was too heavey and worn out to ship along so after trying to give it away, it wound up in the junkyard.  Do search the web for photos, you will find many ideas, both simple and elaborate.

  There's more ways than one to skin a cat and as Das pointed out, you can bend around a lot of different shapes and sizes of things.  I bet even a 5 gallon bucket packed with dirt would work for light stock.   Depends on your need, fab skills, budget etc....  Those rings you made look pretty good bent by hand and eye.

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When I made my welding cart/torch stand, I bent the rings cold, welded them shut, and then tweaked the curves by eye. You can get surprisingly close to perfectly round by tapping down the high spots over the heel of the anvil. 

AB3BD9C4-CEB4-416F-883A-711FA280E084.jpeg

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  Those turned out nice!  I was thinking, If you just tack welded the continents on the outside edges to the globe rings and buffed them out with a grinder you might not burn through so bad...  Keep most of the heat on the ring.

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Well we went from "Extreme Drought" to a week of rain---right when the Electrical CoOp was to install the underground feed to my shop *before* the three day holiday! (And last night a severe storm with flash flooding, they were cleaning the mud and rocks off the road to town where the arroyos ran over it.)

So; Hot, Muggy---unusual for NM, no electricity in the shop  .   I worked on cleaning up/out the shop.  I would work an hour or two and then go sit in front of the fan an hour or two.

Threw away a lot of stuff that I no longer thought I could use.  Moved a lot of stuff I had stored inside when I was not around the place to the outside.  More room in the shop than shortly after it was built!  After dealing with a number of kaowool mouse nests I think I will cut a kitty door for the local barn cats!

Towel Racks: is the finish resistant to rusting over time?   May want to think of using stainless steel for them.

On my breaks; I was reading a new to me author and having trouble with technological mismatches---like a culture still using horses with high pressure sewage lines in pipes with valves on them.  (Also they were so "unfamiliar" with the smell of sewage...Horses in the streets?)  I guess what really affected my "willing suspension of disbelief" was when some one had just survived a battle where in addition to the strains and bruises that had a number of burns, luckily fairly light, and so they eagerly get into a hot tub at the upper limit of bearability.  Now having been forging for 40 years now I can say that a temperture bearable for burns may involve ICE floating in the water!  Not so hot is was "barely bareable".  Really gave me the feeling that the author was rather clueless and had not consulted folks who were not.  Their editor they so lauded and their reading group don't seem to have been able to suggest mapping the culture to technology appropriate for it either.

Probably no work on getting electricity today after the storm last night; of course the next long weekend I might spend in the shop will be the end of November...

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13 hours ago, Haywood71 said:

Got my press welded up, now to make dies and wait for pump and control valve

That looks really nice. Are you working off plans, or is this a built as you go project? What size cylinder are you using? 

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6 hours ago, pnut said:

Will you be using coal or charcoal?

Pnut, for the first attempts I will use charcoal, it is cheaper and easier to buy here. I have a coke supplier a couple of miles near my house, but I don't know if it's suitable for forging steel.

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Charley, I have used coke for years instead of coal because it is pretty much smokeless except for the wood or coal you use to get it started.  The main difference from coal is that you have to keep air flowing to it to keep it lit.  A coal fire will just sit there and burn while you are doing something else but a coke fire will go out.  With a coal fire you can go in the house and eat lunch and come back and start the air again and have a forging fire quickly.  With a coke fire it will go out within 10 minutes or so. 

This requires you to organize your work flow differently.  If you are doing something at the bench you have to give the blower crank a couple of turns every couple of minutes if you have a hand crank blower.  If you have an electric blower you need to keep it running on a low setting and tend the fire occasionally. 

Coal and coke each have advantages as a solid forge fuel but I have gotten used to coke.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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6 hours ago, pnut said:

My friend also said I could use his garage in a nearby city, but once again I'm worried about someone breaking into it and making off with everything. 

I believed that security in the USA was better than here and that there was not so much crime there. We live worried about the same thing, that someone breaks into our workshop or house.

Daswulf, thank you.

George, yours is very good information for me, I will ask the supplier for costs and delivery times. Thank you.

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At my old house, I never had any security concerns. I moved two block and now everything gets locked up tight. (Moved closer to the train tracks, and in old grand house that makes it look like we have money…) For my area, it’s all about location. Generally, my town has very low crime rates, just a lot of questionable foot traffic at my particular location…

David

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The USA is a big place. Some places that I've lived, you could leave the door to your house unlocked and the keys in your car; other places, you wouldn't want to put a suitcase down without putting it between your feet.

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If I had customers like that I'd give going professional some serious thought Alexandr.

That's a nice fence, clean and attractive. Is it just to support the raspberries? 

We've never lost anything with a dog on duty. Where we are now, we'd be a prime target but we've had dogs for better than 20 years. I think the hoodlums are trained. That and the police just ask some questions for the report if you shoot thieves. IF you shoot them dead that is.

Frosty The Lucky.

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That fence is gorgeous.

 

And yeah USA is huge have lived in safe areas like JHCC said where dont have to lock a thing but have also lived where everything must be tied down or it's gone. 

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Alexandr, are the balls on the top of the vertical portions of the raspberry fence solid or hollow?

I also wanted to say that my wife and I really enjoy the photos of your work and the general scenic Russia photos.  We are hoping to do a Scandanavia trip in 2022 if covid allows and your photos are influencing us to think seriously about a side trip to northern Russia.

Re baroque architecture and decoration: Too much is never enough.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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11 hours ago, Pat Masterson said:

I’m constantly on the breaks looking for what most consider junk. 

My spotter for blacksmith road kill is my wife. She can spot usable steel at 60 mph.:) One day we were in rush hour traffic in the city and came to a stop at a light. She jumped out of the car, ran over to the curb and returned with a nearly new rear coil spring before anyone could blow the horn at us. It must have been from an accident and missed by the clean up crew. Any wonder I love that girl.

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The summer I had pneumonia and was out of work a month; I had to go to the Dr for chest xrays and then  the Company Dr about twice a week.  I was in too bad a shape to drive; so my wife drove me. Coming back from one visit I told her to STOP and PULL OVER. Then I slowly got out of the car and trudged back to where I had seen an 8# sledgehammer in the weeds alongside the highway.  I dragged it back to the car, crawled back in and we returned home. (Made me feel better that day once I recovered from the walking---pneumonia is not nice at all!)

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20 hours ago, George N. M. said:

are the balls on the top of the vertical portions of the raspberry fence solid or hollow?

hollow

 

20 hours ago, George N. M. said:

think seriously about a side trip to northern Russia.

Welcome! I can be your guide. :)

 

21 hours ago, Frosty said:

Is it just to support the raspberries? 

Yes, for raspberries, half round for cucumbers.

 "the rich have their quirks":D

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