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What did you do in the shop today?


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Here's the scrolling fork I did today. It started as 18 inches of 3/8"x1" mild. The class was for a 3/4" jaw fork with a loop on the handle but there was plenty of stock, so I decided to get more practice on the technique and did it again on the other end. The necks are a little rough, my arms were starting to complain while I was drawing them out, so I figured I'd stop before I mess it up too bad. I'll finish drawing it out in my shop later.

It was a good day. No one got hurt, everyone laughed at least once and I got to pay back some of the kindness given to me when I started. Just a few little things for the beginner I was sharing a forge with, like showing him how to move metal quicker with hotter metal or that he can use his shoulder when he swings instead of just his elbow.

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6 hours ago, HammerHeart said:

Here's my first attempt at a flatter

Man you are on a roll. Good looking tool. Let us know how you like it.  I have a weird little flatter type thing. Looks like it's for a power hammer or treadle hammer. It's just a flat square of steel with a rod welded on. I don't think I've ever used it as a flatter though. I've used the thin edge to set down a shoulder but that's not it's intended use. It's mine though and that's how I intended to use it that day. ;)

Pnut

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You got that right man. Use anything you can find that will get the job done : ) and thanks man Iv had alot of nights where I say "I'm trying that tomorrow" sadly I realize I don't have any longer stock so here lately iv been making different projects and half way through I realize "oh man this tool would be so useful right now" so that's my next project : )

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Put the tool down on the list in your notebook.  Make it when you get a chance.  The notebook is a great help on those days that you need ideas on what to do in the fire. 

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Thanks for the good thoughts yall. I do have to say though that it was not the piece i was working on but my firepoker that bit me. Dont take long in the coals for them to heat up. After i did it i stuck my burnt digits in the slack tank until the sting stopped, i read once that is the best thing to do, this morning you can not even tell it was burnt and just a little tender. 

Most of my scares are from flux. A few on my arm and it always seems to find that spot between the webbing of my thumb and my hammer handle. 

Nice flatter there Hammerheart. 

JHCC, from your other work i know that the Church will be pleased. Dont forget pics of the finished piece. I was wondering though, what is the rubber wrapped around the vice handle for? 

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Keeping the vise handle from biting.

7 hours ago, Shabumi said:

The class was for a 3/4" jaw fork with a loop on the handle but there was plenty of stock, so I decided to get more practice on the technique and did it again on the other end.

You’ve got enough length there that you could cut it in the middle and put a loop on the resulting square ends.

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5 hours ago, Glenn said:

Put the tool down on the list in your notebook.  Make it when you get a chance.  The notebook is a great help on those days that you need ideas on what to do in the fire. 

I'm a big proponent of note and sketch books in the shop, I favor graph paper for sketches. Another excellent way to keep on track and remind yourself of intended projects is a blackboard. Having a large working drawing in easy view while you're at the anvil can really make a difference. I painted the hood over my too large coal forge flat black as a chalk board, semi gloss is much easier to erase, next time.

Frosty The Lucky.

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18 hours ago, CrazyGoatLady said:

Oh that makes me hurt, JHCC!  I had seen a mosquito sitting on my anvil earlier and I thought it was biting me. I was busy so I didn't think anything about it until it got really intense. First time on my neck. I have little white scars on my arms from scale. It seems to love me

Must be whats called a "megnetic prersonality"

Rumour has it you can't scar a scar, but it still hurts when its hit with hot stuff.

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So, the old lady went out to the barn a while ago, came back in saying there was a cat that was sickly in there. She went out just real quick so no jacket, so she grabs her jacket and says she is going to go check on it. She come back in with kind of a wierd look on her face. I just came back in from burying the the dead possum she found. 

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I spent 3.5 hours today at my force. I made J hooks, welded up a smooth jaw wrench for twisting, and made side shields for my outdoor forge. So far I have 21.5 hours under my belt blacksmithing. I'm really loving forging a lot. Just wish I could do it everyday.

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On February 9, 2020 at 3:34 PM, John B said:

Rumour has it you can't scar a scar, but it still hurts when its hit with hot stuff.

I assure you, you can most certainly scar a scar.. the texture changes completely.   

 

Hard to see in the photo, but there are many scars on top of scars.  

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Not forging, as such, but I took my "new to me" Tombstone welder to a friend's shop to make sure it works........and my new extension cord was hooked up right.  Everything worked great and I'm tickled to say I've got an arc welder for my shop.................finally.  Now all I have to do is to run 45 feet of 220V to my forging room so I'll have a plug out there.

Gettin' ready to go put a coat of KOL on the ceiling of my forge.  YEAH!!!!!!

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Intermittent rain and consistent wind, so no forging today. However, finished up the hammer handles (and had a lovely missed strike while driving the wedge... ahhh, good ole BPNeuritis...) and tried re-arranging my limited garage space. I really need to get my TDI done so I can get it out of the way. ADHD and priorities, ce la vie. 

 

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On February 9, 2020 at 6:13 PM, Savage11 said:

Is your tombstone welder AC, or does it have DC as well? If it has DCEN you can dry line tig with it. 

AC only..........and I know the limitations.  It's exactly what I need for what I want to be able to do.  I'm as happy as a bug in a rug.

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I started with a Century AC arc welder at home in 1994. I got tips from every welder I could along the way. Here at my current job, they only had an old Miller 200 mig machine. However, as time went on, the owner picked up  a used Lincoln 225 AC machine, so at least I had the option of using stick at work.

The first home projects almost always end up being geared  to set yourself up to do more welding as you learn. If your machine does not already have wheels under it, I suggest that as a good starter project.

It has been a fun ride harnessing "magic pixies" (as Ave says). AC works great, and has an advantage when encountering a phenomena called 'arc blow'. E6013 & E6011 in 3/32 or 1/8 inch diameter are good AC rods to try out. There are lots more. Good luck with your wiring!

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You didn't bury a possum pretending to be dead did you Billy? They have a rep for that you  know. -_-

I was visiting an acquaintance in Marshfield Wi. and we were walking somewhere, he has many acres of exciting stuff. Anyway a critter catches my eye laying next to the walk by a building and say, "there's a dead animal here." 

He replies, "It's a possum."

To which I say (go ahead roll your eyes now, get it over with), "I think the possum's dead!" To which he stops, turns around and gives me THE look over the top of his glasses and just waits for the lights to come on. While I was looking at him the possum decided I wasn't going to kill and eat it right that second so it took off and sure nuff it was long gone when I looked back. 

I must've been pretty goofy the first time I saw fireflies too. Didn't have them in S. Cal. when I was growing up either.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I used a Lincoln AC only tombstone and welded everything I still have today with it made 30 years ago..  

AC only isn't much of a problem and they do make AC rods today.  I used to use AC or DC rods..  6011 for rusty stuff, 7014 for general use and 7018 low hydrogen for more strict stuff where I was worried about cracking. 

My only concern is the distance from the house to the Welder..  I don't know what the amp draw is..  I just know over a distance like that the cord needs to be pretty heavy.. 

 

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