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I Forge Iron

Plucky


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SpatchCoq au vin works. Please note I am NOT suggesting Alaska Native ingredients for the recipe. You DON'T want to bury the chicken till it ripens up do you?:o New potatoes for an Irish slant or cook it like Haggis for a little of the Scot?

Coq au Ketchup for a Coq up, main dish. 

Oooo, this is fun. I'll be back.

Frosty The Lucky.

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So how many folks have forged a larding needle?    Most folks nowadays are more used to grain finished meats that don't require the extra fat for cooking.

Now I wasn't going to mention the Chocolate Amaretto Pie recipe we found in a Roswell Symphony Guild cookbook---along with the "body bag pork roast" recipe---it has a whole series of "crash related" items in it.   (My wife has increased the Amaretto content for me as my lack of teeth has impacted my pecan pie consumption lately. We use a lower proof Amaretto anyway.)

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  Ahh.. Haggis.  Can you please expound on the ripe, buried chicken business, it sounds promising.   Thomas, get some new choppers if you are having trouble gnawing through pecan pie.  Please...???  I have to get some bottom ones soon and may have to resort to Amaretto myself.

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I'm waiting for them to come in; things are taking a lot longer lately...and I'm not too sure about my new dentist.   Took the impressions before he pulled the remains of the old teeth.  Then had to take them again; before they healed. I suspect I'll have some fitting to do once everything is healed.  OTOH my wife has been spending a lot more time in the kitchen lately and so I'm not losing weight...Curried Chicken over rice with Major Grey's Mango Chutney for lunch today.

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Burying is a food preparation method usually used for fish and eggs, I don't know if they used it for fowl. The Native name for "White Fish" prepared this was translates as "Stink Fish."

I'm not a connoisseur so I can't think of many foods that have been buried I think of as edible. Potatoes, carrots, peanuts, etc. mmmmmm. 3 month old fish?:o

Frosty The Lucky.

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Hákarl---for when lutefisk is just not enough! (When I saw the warning to be sure to wear rubber gloves when preparing it as it would eat your skin I crossed it off my bucket list.)

Kiviak a fermented fowl dish

Some of these things make starvation seem like a viable option!

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I remember the episode when Antony Bourdain tried to eat harkarl. He managed to get a bite in his mouth but I don't think he swallowed. The Icelanders feasting with him were all getting a good natured laugh. 

I had to look it up but I recall tell about Kiviaq and not being so tempted to give it a try. Sort of Inuit haggis that slow cooks underground rather than get boiled.

I recommend either for folk who find weight watchers ineffective. 

Muktuk is surprisingly good if it's been frozen when really fresh. Good Muktuk whale blubber is like bacon with layers of meat and blubber. You cut thin slivers off a frozen piece and dip it in seal oil.  

Frosty The Lucky.

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