Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Recommended Posts

Frosty; remember that famous quote (mis)attributed to Ben Franklin about beer?

I was on metformin for a decade or so until my Dr finally decided it was beginning to cause me problems.  I don't miss it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Steve Sells said:

I hate taking Metformin

Me too, and that other thing I have to take. Every time the Doctor says that it is time to adjust the dosages, I have to wear black contractor trash bag pants while driving. "No side effects" - BAH!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was on 2000 ml a day of metformin for quite a while. My stomach hurt all the time and I could not make a real stool.      I don't miss metformin either!!~!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess I AM Lucky, I've been taking 2,000mg of metformin without a problem since I was diagnosed in Oct, 1999.  My endocrinologist says it's the my most effective med and if I could drop 40lbs I do a LOT better. Ever know of a doctor who didn't say, "watch your diet and get more exercise?"

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Doc put me on Metformin because I was borderline diabetic.  Messed my guts up something fierce.  Finally took me off of the RX and just told me to watch my sugar intake.  Told her I would................I'm a sugar-aholic, so that's not easy to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  Thats a fine bottle opener and a cool concept.  I can imagine all sorts of possibilities.  I may need a bigger forge though.  I wonder if contraction of the metal as it cools would present a problem with cracking and if tempering and slow cooling would help.  How about slumping it into/over expanded metal?!?  I have some research to do...  Something new, red hot and dangerous to delve into.  Wonderful!!!

 

  Thankfully, I dont have to take Metformin. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Metformin works fine for many folks. And some not.

The doctor should be checking kidney function regularly. Metformin can cause kidney problems for some patients.

SLAG.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Frosty; remember that famous quote (mis)attributed to Ben Franklin about beer?

Doesn't ring a bell. Must be the dents.

53 minutes ago, Nodebt said:

I wonder if contraction of the metal as it cools would present a problem with cracking

Heh, heh, heh. Funny you should ask. I don't recall who, maybe Brian Brazeal but a demonstrator at a club meeting slumped a marble in a spread cross and one of the other guys got really good at it. I was looking for something that'd maybe lay a little more flush and hit an art glass supply. I hunted around and went home with the torch work glass noodles. I wasn't liking crushing pieces, it was too hard getting them evenly ground and estimating quantities. The results were kind of weird too.

I recalled seeing frit and went back for some. I was describing what I was doing and he kept insisting the glass would fall off. I couldn't seem to get it through that I wasn't surrounding the steel I was filling negative spaces. He finally told me I needed to take some classes or I'd never understand how impossible what I was trying was.

That's when I took the crucifix pendant I'd made for Deb out of my pocket and showed him. End of discussion, he wouldn't even touch it, I paid and left.

This isn't a new thing, "The Art Of Blacksmithing" has a few pages describing crushing old windows, colored bottles, etc. and melting them into iron frames for decorative purposes. In the book Bealer says glass and iron have very close to the same COE and slow cooling relieves the stresses. I've found it's true for steel it and glass expand and contract about the same amount. The only problem is how much faster steel cools than does glass but slow cooling handles it. I imagine the trick works incredibly well with wrought iron with all it's silicate inclusions. 

Over heating the frit burns the color out of the glass so I've learned not to let it get very hot.

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Close to the same COE' - Ahh! There is the magic!

The 2003 Cedar Fire slumped mobile home jack stands and frames, and the glass pouring down from above, tightly enameled non-negative spaces and surfaces.  Frosty, your above elucidation ties it up neatly for me.

Robert Taylor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the slow cool that's the magic as metals tend to cool much faster than nonmetals if given the chance!

Composition of the glass makes a difference too. I was experimenting with some Y1.1K enameling and found that my home ground stained glass enamels would spall; but a lens from a 1940's? (spoil pile down by the rive in Columbus OH)  brake light did fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly, a slow cool, called tempering (I think) where glass is concerned is really important. It's composition is why I started using torch work glass, it's a lot less sensitive to faster cooling.

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/30/2020 at 9:54 PM, Frosty said:

This isn't a new thing, "The Art Of Blacksmithing" has a few pages...

  I am always the last to know....   Seriously though, it's a new one to me and rather exciting.  I was trying to glue glass bead "eyeballs" on a few projects, but they looked all bulgey and you could see the glue through the glass.  I can envision a new way of doing it now.  I have an idea for a big butterfly (big chopper mandibles and all) with all different colors built into its wings and may be able to adapt this technique too it.  

 

  There is an artist collective near me and I may pay them a visit.  I know they have a glass blowing department and may be able to learn something first hand.  It's been years since I last visited and things may have changed, especially with this foul virus circulating around.  I'd do some experimenting but my shop has been downsized, packed up and buried behind several tons of assorted household belongings.  Thanks for the thoughts and information fellows.

 

  Ben Franklin:  “Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.” 

 

  True for some.... Others, not so much.

Scott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never tried filling a space more than about 3/8" across. 

Old Ben had a reputation and that's right in character. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...