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Arm and Hammer Anvil - looking for date and approx value


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Hello everyone! My wife’s grandpa gave me some free goodies that he’s been holding on to for years. The coolest is this little anvil. It looks like it’s gotten a couple little repairs and might have a mild steel body with a hardened steel top plate, but I’m not entirely sure. The logo is really worn down, but after a ton of research I found it is a second generation Arm and Hammer (2nd gen as in 2nd logo design). There are remnants of numbers stamped below the logo, but its hard to make them out. From what I can tell, it looks like a 2 and a 6, but this definitely weighs more than 26 pounds. I looked for any other identification marks, but I see no remnants of a serial number on the feet or body, and on the underside theres a square hole like a holding hole, not the normal oval indentation that is associated with the Arm & Hammer brand. Since this was passed to me from family, I'm trying to gather as much info on it so I can relay it back to my wife's grandpa. I'm working on setting it up for my work area so i can start using it too of course, but just trying to gather the history behind it.

With that said, knowing it's an Arm & Hammer, I'm looking for the rough year it may have been made, what I might be looking at for weight (i also have a 66 pound cast steel anvil, and this a&h one is definitely heavier), (we only have a glass scale at home, so i dont really want to risk setting it on there to measure it), and roughly what the value would be on it if it was purchased outright. Again this was given to me for free, so my curiosity needs to know :P. 

Thanks in advance!

 

Side View:

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Front feet:

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Logo:

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As for value: which of the 100+ countries that participate here is it in?   Anvils are cheaper in some countries and more expensive in others.  Shoot just location in the USA used to make one to two dollars a pound difference not that long ago!

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1 minute ago, ThomasPowers said:

As for value: which of the 100+ countries that participate here is it in?   Anvils are cheaper in some countries and more expensive in others.  Shoot just location in the USA used to make one to two dollars a pound difference not that long ago!

Sorry, I didn't think about adding that since I just created the profile a few minutes before posting. I'm located in Wisconsin, United States

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I didn’t have a wire wheel, so I just lightly brushed over it with the abrasive disk on the angle grinder to take the top layer of rust off. Looks like it says W W 5965 on the front feet. 
 

When I get paid next I’m going to get a flap disk and clean the rest of the rust off of it but I at least want to get the info.

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The word i the arch is Warranted. Solid wrought in the bar below. 

Please use a twisted wire cup brush to clean it up, it won't remove metal, only the rust and dirt. A dusting with chalk or flour then wiped lightly with a rag will help bring out stamped characters. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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A hand powered wire brush will remove rust and dirt and not metal. Just takes a little longer by hand than with electric.

Once the rust and dirt are removed, shine a bright light from the side at a low angle to create shadows where the markings are located.  Place a piece of thin paper over the markings and rub them with a pencil.  Dust it with chalk, flour, or baby powder, use a rag and lightly remove some of the material on the very surface.  This will fill in the depressions showing you the markings.  Use all three methods and you should recover much of the information.  

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