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I Forge Iron

Forged 1084 antler, birch bark and brass


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I like it.  I wouldn't have thought that birch bark was tough enough for stacked handle material but how it wears over years of use will tell the tale.  I do suggest that you find or make a rivet set for the end of your pommel.  It would give a much more finished look to the peened over tang.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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George; birch bark is a traditional handle material for the Finnish puukko knives; which are definitely using blades!  I don't know how different varieties of birch bark work; but at least one species is known good!

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That's an attractive knife.

5 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

I don't know how different varieties of birch bark work; but at least one species is known good!

In my experience things covered in birch bark make effective clubs. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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The Black Birch was it not? Anecdotally proven effective but not perfect!  I always thought OOOTS Durkon knew about your accident. (But I can't accuse Frosty of Dendrophobia due to the "unreasoned" part of the definition.)

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I'll leave that to the philosophers---John?

I recently claimed to be "boringly normal"; which should open up a LOT of space under than definition.

My wife swears that after tonight I will NOT look like Karl Marx! (She didn't say anything about Groucho though...)

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Actually  bnewberry showed his newest creation rather than starting a topic about birch bark handles....didnt he?

Seven comments, six of them discussing birch bark....I override the birch bark and rather comment on the knife which shows one of the

most useful blade and handle shape combinations....vicious convex blade grind and beautifully tapered formed handle!

Thats a fine user You made!....on the riveting  of tang on the butt I agree with George....there is space for developement

Add a secondary washer disk this helps riveting and looks more clean and crafty.

Cheers

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bnewberry, I really like your knife................in fact, I like everything about it.  The blade looks very user friendly for a lot of purposes.  Was a little surprised at the inclusion of antler on this knife but have to admit it goes well with the over all "look".  The handle is gorgeous, in my opinion.........and I really like the shape.  I'm working on a knife now (long, slow process) that will have a similar handle shape, I think.  Wish I had some Birch to stack...........it really looks nice.  As for your peening of the tang....................well, I like it, like it a lot.  Gives the knife an earthy, organic look it might not have had with a fancy, finely finished pommel nut.  Over all, sir, I'd say "well done".

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On 7/5/2020 at 11:51 PM, templehound said:

Add a secondary washer disk this helps riveting and looks more clean and crafty.

I will try the washer idea. Thanks for that and the feedback!

On 7/6/2020 at 10:25 AM, Chris C said:

bnewberry, I really like your knife................in fact, I like everything about it.  Wish I had some Birch to stack...  Gives the knife an earthy, organic look it might not have had with a fancy, finely finished pommel nut.  Over all, sir, I'd say "well done".

Suitable birch bark is hard to come by unless you live in an area where they grow. It is a Good material to work with and the hand feel is fantastic. Thanks!

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Oddly enough, for a broad leaf tree, birch bark is very flammable and makes very good tinder and fire starting material.  This is not generally known by folk who live where birch trees don't grow.  This does not seem to be the case for other poplars, the tree family that birch, aspen, and cottonwood are members.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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I love the look of the birch bark. Think in all, it's a well proportioned blade too.

You have just solidified my plans to use it in a future project.

I live in Ohio- but come from michigan originally. In a not so recent trip through the upper peninsula to get my anvil- I passed through a region where the highway was lined with birch trees for about six or seven miles. I may have to take another road trip now! Thanks alot bnewberry...:D:P

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Certain types of birch bark should be pretty tough.  Native Americans made canoes (and may still do so) from birch bark.  Had to stand up from hitting logs and rocks in the water, for sure!

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On 7/8/2020 at 11:24 AM, George N. M. said:

Oddly enough, for a broad leaf tree, birch bark is very flammable and makes very good tinder and fire starting material.  This is not generally known by folk who live where birch trees don't grow.  This does not seem to be the case for other poplars, the tree family that birch, aspen, and cottonwood are members.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

Roger about the flammability of birch bark, the black smoke contains lots of creosote. It's also really strong and tough. 

However, it's NOT in the aspen family. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birch

Frosty The Lucky.

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OK, my bad.  I was not a forestry major and had always thought that birches were related to aspen and cottonwoods.  Now I know differently.  

The Voyageurs and other northwoodsmen always carried a roll of birchbark to start fires.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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Ah, not a bad George, I had to look it up so I'm a little more educated than I was yesterday. I only live in a forest, I'm not a forester. There is so much about trees I don't know I have to double check anything I think I know before I opine. 

This one I've done. Birch bark is excellent for starting fires, you can't get it wet enough it won't light easily and burn fiercely. A pinch of tinder fungus also commonly known as bracket fungus nestled in a little birch bark is easy flint striker tinder. As fast if not faster than char cloth. NOT as fast as the old Voyageur trick of sprinkling a pinch of gun powder in the tinder though.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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On 7/9/2020 at 10:04 AM, Welshj said:

I love the look of the birch bark. Think in all, it's a well proportioned blade too.

You have just solidified my plans to use it in a future project.

I live in Ohio- but come from michigan originally. In a not so recent trip through the upper peninsula to get my anvil- I passed through a region where the highway was lined with birch trees for about six or seven miles. I may have to take another road trip now! Thanks alot bnewberry...:D:P

Thanks! Please let us know how this goes. I haven’t used Michigan birch yet, I bought scraps from a canoe maker out West.

On 7/9/2020 at 9:40 PM, Moosetrot said:

The Ojibwa word for birch bark is "wigwassie".  Your knife is beautiful!

Moosetrot

 

Thanks, wigwassie has a nice swing to it!

On 7/10/2020 at 9:16 AM, bubba682 said:

Nice knife i really like the shape and handle..

Thanks! It feels good in the hand.

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