Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Recommended Posts

Hello Everyone:

I am from Tuscaloosa Alabama and I am new to this. I told you all everything I know (about blacksmithing) when I said Hello Everyone. Anyway, I have always been interested in blacksmithing. I finally decided to start collecting a few tools. I just purchased an Anvil yesterday. It's an 85 or 90 lb. It has a symbol at the base of the anvil just below the waist. It is a circle with Vulcan Brand written in it...It also has II & B, Co. on the end of the base below the waist. It appears to be welded at the(or near the middle) of the waist. So I know it is a vulcan. I think it has a design in the middle of that circle as well. I paid $200.00 fot it and suspect that I got taken. It is in fairly good shape. Not a lot of ring to it...hammer bounced/rebounded very well. This all happened on the tailgate of my truck. I figured thnat since it was local (and I could pick it up) I could pay more. So, is this an adequate anvil???

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vulcan anvils are a huge step up from a Harbor Freight cast iron ASO.

They are made with a steel face and horn plate with cast iron body. As such they are a quiet anvil and so good to use when you have close neighbors.

However, the face is generally softer than many traditionaly made anvils and may also be thinner. They are also harder to repair.

I think you paid too much for your location: over US$2 a pound. BTAIM---you have a decent using anvil and can get your money's worth out of it by getting to smithing sooner!

The design in the raised emblem is an arm holding a hammer. II&B is: Illinois Iron and Bolt co.

My travel anvil is a 91# Arm and Hammer (different brand) that uses the arm and hammer logo punched into the side of a traditionally made anvil. Good size as I can move it about easily but it is still large enough to do real work on it. Mine rings like a bell which is a good way to draw crowds at a demo; but I have to wear earplugs or hearing protectors when using it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have always been interested in blacksmithing. I just purchased an Anvil in fairly good shape. Is this an adequate anvil???


Let's look at this from the "other" side. You HAVE an anvil !! Go to IForgeIron.com > Blueprints > BP0133 and you can get a forge for little or no investment, and a couple hours time. Let the cost of the anvil launch you into blacksmithing in only a couple of days. Start a fire, heat up some metal and enjoy life.

Between now and when your ready to move up to a second anvil, your Vulcan will have taught you hammer control, how to move metal, and produced several nice projects. It will spark your interest to continue in blacksmithing and, through reading, help you better understand what you need in the second anvil, and where to locate that anvil at a reasonable price. Not every deal is sweet, but that does not mean it was a bad deal.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Glenn said a mouth full. NOW you have an avil, forget about how much you paid for it. Must of us have been taken in the past, we just don't want to admit it....;) It's better to learn hammer control on this one than on a good anvil and end up damaging the face and/or edges. Welcome, good luck, and have fun!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 7 months later...

I own a #200 vulcan anvil and I use it at my work (auto and truck mechanic shop) It is quiet so the other workers don't mind when I have to use it. I paid $100.00 dollars for it about 6 years ago. So somettime it is good to not ring so loud. But my demo anivl is a peter wright and it rings to let all know theat i am forging.
Gaylan

Link to post
Share on other sites

i have a little 70 pound vulcan anvil that i use right along side of my big 500lb PW, the vulcan has nice sharp edges and a good little horn (yes normally sharp edges are bad on a anvil in my opinion, but my big PW has enough rounded edges for normal work, just random things that i do that i like to have sharp edges for ) for getting into tight places, and i repaired a few of the edges on my vulcan easy as can by, just heated up some little springs and pulled them out straight to use as tig filler rod. the little springs leave a bead so hard that a file wont scratch them, like i said i just used a tig to work up some little chips off the side and some bad scars some knuckle head put in the top cutting straight on the anvil with a cold chisel. just welded quick little short beads to keep the heat down, the face it still pretty dang hard, i think its a great little anvil, i keep it on a stand about 6 inches higher than my normal working anvil, makes a good height for small things that im doing light work on, don't have to bend down at all to see what i doing

i payed 100 for my little 70lb and think its great

Edited by Mlmartin15
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 years later...
On 3/4/2009 at 6:14 PM, jhbruce4 said:

i just purchased a vulcan brand anvil. it has a 12 on one side and a 43 on the other side. can anyone tell me how old it is , how much it weighs and what is the value. the edges are sharp. thank.s

It is 120 lbs and probably made in 1943

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...