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Looks like a Badger; or similar. Is there a swell under the hardy hole?  If so it's a steel faced cast iron anvil and on the lowest level of the quality tier. Check the rebound, shouldn't have a ring.  How badly do you need a low grade anvil? (They are even hard to repair and the face looks pretty thin.)  I wouldn't pay US$3 per pound for it.  (Assuming US and not Canadian Dollars.)

US does not necessarily mean "Good"; Sears Roebuck sold ASOs as well as rebranded top tier anvils in the same catalog on the same pages with different price points.

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If you absolutely need a quiet anvil NOW that may affect your willingness to pay; but I think a big hunk of steel from a scrapyard would be just as good if not better and, where I am, run you 20 cents a pound.  I have a 248# PW I am selling for US$4 a pound in better shape than that; but I will be taking out a beginning smith to the scrapyard  Saturday to get a much more cost effective anvil for his use. (As long as he doesn't go for the 40 000 pound naval gun barrel piece...)

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The guy told me it had a hand with a hammer Vulcan patent says 1875. I was thinking about just buying some chunks of steel and welding them together to make an anvil. Have some piece picked out on ebay. They weigh around 168#, thats 10 pieces total. Two 1"x4"x23" 4140 annealed for the top two plates, a 4"x3"x8" 4130 for the middle area, 5 pieces of mild steel most are a 1" or 1 1/8" thick by 3"-4" wide 8"-10" long those would be in the middle somewhere also, lastly 2 plates 1/2"×10"×11" for the bottom with holes in the corners to bolt it down. 

Is that to much work or even possible to weld? Total would be $277 shipped for a 168 pound anvil plus the sticks to weld it. Dont know how much that would cost.

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Look for a massive piece locally as full penetration welds are expensive and time consuming. GET OFF THE NET, it's often a terrible way to try to find stuff locally. 

Many people get excited about how old anvils may be but in the craft they are not considered old till around 200 years old---they wear like iron!

I use my 1828 William Foster anvil from time to time and the postvise that Frank Turley said was "pre-1800".

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  • 1 month later...

That looks a LOT like the presumptive Badger I picked up awhile back on the cheap to repair. Badgers are supposed to be better than Vulcans, but this one didn't weld very well, even with the special cast iron rods ($$$). Lots of fizzing and burning in the weld puddle. That one is still functional, but I wouldn't pay 375, and don't count on being able to repair it in any way.

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