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Justin’s Smithing progression. [PIC heavy]


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You must remember that a fellow out east of me has over 600 anvils; so he could do a wall rather than a stack.  Of course all mine are being used. (Some more than others.)   I didn't mention the 248# PW I am going to sell as I don't consider it one of my using anvils.

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Thanks and no worries!  I’ve got a few projects in the works I think will be really interesting. A small leg vise of some sort is on the list to be done eventually. And a small anvil. Maybe 1-2 lbs. but first I need to make up a complete set of cold chipping chisels now that I have the info I need 

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Been busy with things other than forging unfortunately and a storm took out my canopy fully this time haha. but I’ll be back Forging soon. During my involuntary break I discovered sucker rod for sale near me. I’m in a state with a good amount of oil so they are easily available. I was just wondering a few applications y’all have made with them. I know it’s 4140 or similar. I can get 3/4, 7/8, and 1 inch rods 25 feet long. 7$ for the 3/4 stick 8.50$ for the 7/8 and 9$ a stick for the 1” round. Figured i should pick a few up since it’s so cheap and was wondering what to do with it. 

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You can do what ever you want with it.. 

for that kind of money I'd buy 5 of each or more..  WE pay a premium for 4140 up here. 

4140 is not as such a "Tool steel".  but it works well for both hammers, hot chisels, punches and top tools. 

It originally was designed as an "Airframe" steel made in tubing and then used for bike frames as well.. It was known as "Chrome Moly"  It was originally designed for gas welding and the joint welded and tubing welded retained its strength..  Previous to this steel air frames were tough to make without a lot of extra wire bracing.

 

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41xx (chrome moly) steels are best known for not work hardening. 4130 is the air frame steel an much has been taking the pounding light planes undergo since the 1920s. The existence of stress fractures is almost unheard of and usually the result of incorrect welding or unapproved alterations. Old school wire coat hangers and oxy acet torch or Tig welding were approved for air frames. Recently say last 30 years mig welders have taken over the role but a gas torch and approved rod is still approved.

4140 was developed to be stronger and was generally used for gun breaches. Tough stuff.

Uses are as said most anything. It'll be harder to forge but it's great for tooling that doesn't need to hold an edge under harsh conditions, say cold chisels though it works well enough in shears. 

Good stuff, a stick of each would be a good minimum.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I’m well familiar with 4140 it’s my preference for hammer making due to it being pretty tough. It’s also what I make hot work tools out of as it seems to hold up well. I would’ve never guessed the applications it was designed for haha. Thanks everyone for your insight 

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I’m looking for some advise. I’d like to attempt to forge a block and tackle and I was wondering if there was some insight about that the best way to go about forging the pulleys themselves would be. I was thinking perhaps form a circle or maybe take some bar stock and fuller it to make the pulleys? Unless there is a better way I’m unaware of?

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Years and years ago I attempted to forge a set of double tackle.   

It is very much possible but found for my own stuff it was time consuming beyond merit.  (cheap and easy to find/buy at barn sales, flea markets and such)

So, there are many possibilities.   One way is to do a 2 piece sheave.. forging out 1 half at a time much like a trivet with spokes in the middle. it is then riveted together and in the vise the flat sections are forged round section is opened up while in a 2 piece swedge. 

Making one out of solid stock is also possible with fullering but found the amount of material displaced had to be accounted for and using a power hammer or a sledge person was a must. 

When I talk about sizes the sheaves were in the 5-6" range and 3/4" rope..  Small wheels are easy with a round file. 

Using a Metal lathe with a ball turner attachment is the easiest way or cast them. 

The side cheeks are just flat metal for the smaller ones and the larger metal ones are flat sheet with bent edges to create more rigidity. 

Or laminated wood.  

Maker choice. 

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Working on a thing to help lift anvils onto stands by myself. Or other heavy things. So I can make it easier and not do damage to myself haha. Looking through some stuff I bought at auctions I found A block and tackle that should work for my needs. 4:1 ratio. Made lifting the 150 pound Henry wright super easy 

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Look for a game hoist.  Some are 4 :1 or more.

 

I personally moved into chain hoists and away from block and tackle.

I bought one for 65.00 which is 1ton Jet brand and is awesome.fully quick adjust.

 

And own 2 chain lever hoists a 1.5ton and a 3 ton with lifetime MFG warranty.

I use these for most of the portable lifting chores psid 75.00and 35.00.

And own a 3/4ton HF chain lever hoist that I use to pull the plow onto the plow truck.

 

The ability to hold the load at any point is so important. 

I own 3 older block and tackle. 1 with auto brakes and when you consider the cost of rope and care taking the chain hoists win out.

 

I'll snap photos later. 

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So here are the photos I promised earlier.  I did forget about the one I have in the trailer which is the 1.5 ton chain lever hoist.   The roller chain ones are super strong and infinite length is possible pretty easy.  The only problem is the chain won't bend sideways very much so a straight line pull is needed or a wrap in the correct direction. 

the regular chain ones don't care. 

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15 hours ago, Justin Topp said:

I’d like to attempt to forge a block and tackle

Forging the block is a LOT of finicky work and I don't know of anybody who knows how to forge tackle.

I stopped buying cable come alongs, chain falls and such at yard/garage/etc. sales a few years ago I don't think I paid over $5 for one but it was probably when I needed one. Now I have plenty. 

Making one as a project sounds like a Journeyman's, master piece to me. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Well I won’t be making the tackle. That’s a lot of chain to make or a lot of rope to weave. Although I do know how to weave rope from grass from back when I was in Boy Scouts haha. Forging the blocks sounds like a challenge I might have to at least attempt. But for real use I’ll be picking up a chain hoist. Seems to be the best bet. Thanks everyone 

 

on a side note I have applied Matrikote 90AC to my forge and I’m overall very pleased with the results. Forge takes slightly longer to come up to temperature. But it gets hotter and seems to heats steel faster. I did no real testing before but 1x1/2x6 inch flat stock took about 1:30-1:45 to reach welding temps. Heated a hammer to a bright yellow temp in 4 

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matrikote.jpg

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