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I Forge Iron

Bjorn makes sharp things. My beginners log book


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Boy, that took me embarrassingly long to figure out. Coral and choral both make spell check happy and I don't write either often enough to remember the fiddly bits. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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That sounds like some great fossil sites Frosty. Didn't even know fossils could be formed by pyrite. That's amazing! I'd love to get my hands on some opalised fossils, but that's just another pipedream I guess. I'd imagine not knowing the trilobite location is a bummer. Trilobites are certainly among my favourite fossils.

How's this for a project by the way? Bike chain and rasp tomahawk. Or my Mad (M)axe if you will.

20200731092753_IMG_8140_1.thumb.JPG.f75ec74b006c5a99bc268f3f79272803.JPG

 

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Take a gander. 

This is the 3rd hit on "Pyrite fossil images". Seems ammonites are really popular so I grabbed this one instead. I'd post a link but they're crazy long, it's an easy search.

Frosty The Lucky.

Pyrite Psm Fossil Crinoid and Shell -  Rettigheim, Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

 

This one's off the Fossil Forum, I was hoping for a fern but this is a nice pic.

  Pyrite fern from St. Clair, PA.

 

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Without going into the geochemistry, under certain conditions the fossils can be replaced by iron sulfide (Fe2S)(iron pyrite) aka "fool's gold."  The name comes from the Greek "pyr meaning fire because pyrite can be used to create sparks to kindle a fire.  Wheel lock fire arms often used pyrite held against a rotating steel wheel to ignite the propellant charge. 

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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Now now. I don't mind learning a bit of geochemistry. Pyrite isn't deposited by water like other silicate based minerals is it? That's gotta be some of coolest fossils I've ever seen!

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Pyrite is a weirdy found in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks.  In sedimentary it's often associated with organics, their decay using up Oxygen and  providing the Sulfur to combine with Iron to form pyrite, FeS2, and replace the original items.

In nonsedimentary rocks it can be hydrothermal.

Pre-Roasted to drive off the sulfur it could be smelted for iron.

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That is odd, but at the same time it makes sense. Different approaches for the same result. I didn't expect that in geology though.

Just finished up my bike chain axe. Here is the final result:

Final.thumb.jpg.cdd44d8cd6944dde689a73e23e1a89e3.jpg

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Picked up some coil spring from the scrapyard. These two, plus their respective twins. Any suggestions to what I can make of them?

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Also did some more work on the patang. Approaching finished now. Really not a fan of working with big blades I've figured out...

IMG_20200819_175411_6.thumb.jpg.4b52caac07ee5e9aa048e10a0698b06b.jpg

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Dad's pyrites: iron or chalcopyrite were (of course) really large and nearly perfect. He said the nice ones were found in semi filled fissures, the fissures that were filled solid were just ore. He had some nice galena too but only because they were nice crystals, not for any interest in them. 

When I see springs that long they make me think bar stools for folks who over imbibe. A person would probably have to weigh over 500lbs. to compress those enough to be sproingy though. Good tool stock. Being painted is excellent, it'll help you spot micro fractures as paint isn't flexible and will peal over cracks even very small ones. Rubbing it hard with a clean hand will cause even small pieces to come off if they're pealing. No, it's not a perfect indicator but it's helpful and cheaper than magnafluxing. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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And now I've just learnt that there are more than one sort of pyrite. And to think that geology was my strongest subject at uni... My brain must've been working in the background on what galena is, as I just got a mental notification telling me galena is lead ore. Sure is pretty though.

Not a bad idea on the bar stools. My brain mainly goes towards catapults. I thought I could make a pogo stick, but seems you have to be about 500 pounds for that to work too, and at that weight I don't think having both feet off the ground simultaneously is recommended.

The yellow springs were new one box, and I think the red ones were also new but without the box, so I think I was pretty lucky. Mainly punches and chisels for coil springs then? I could do with some.

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5 hours ago, Bonnskij said:

I thought I could make a pogo stick, but seems you have to be about 500 pounds for that to work

You could start from the 4th floor and maintain your boyish figure.

I always thought it'd be fun to build a trebuchet, maybe compete in Punkin chunkin. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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After a jump from the 4th floor I doubt my boyish figure would still be maintained. I'd venture I'd be as compressed as the spring. And all that compressed mass would have to go somewhere.

I built an onager for the traditional water fight between year 10 and year 13 students once. Not quite the scale of a trebuchet, but fun nonetheless.

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Ahh, put a tractor seat on it and a belt, you'll have a grand time boinking around once you learn to steer. You DO know a spring is to prolong the deceleration of impact by compressing or stretching. Yes?

I haven't built a catapult or similar since I was a kid and none very successful then. 

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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Back in single digits I got a set of tinker toys one Christmas and quickly found out that by using rubber bands I could make a catapult that would throw marbles hard enough to dent the sheet rock ceiling in the den...  The dents are probably still there 5-6 decades later...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Nevertheless. I fear such force is still too much for my frame to bear. Perhaps I'll consider the other suggestion once my other mode of transport bites the dust. Aah, to be a child again and be able to make medieval weaponry without (too many) side-wards glances.

Speaking of which. The patang is finally finished. To be honest, it is much too heavy and balanced too far towards the front for my tastes, but my colleague loves it. He says it makes him feel like home, and I don't think I can get a better compliment than that. That really warmed my heart.

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