Lenat

Hello from Virginia!

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Hello! I recently moved onto base with my husband in ft Eustis virginia. I'm looking to get into blacksmithing and look forward to learning from a lot of you. A friend of mine Charles suggested this forum and I am extremely happy to find a place with resources. I like to plan well Before executing.

I have 0 experience in smithing, but am not unfamiliar with craft work. I've done leather, woodwork, and costume sewing. I love creating and look forward to experiencing what black smithing has to offer.

Thank you

Nikkik

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Check and see if there are any workshops available on base where you could use tools to build things---like burners and a propane forge!

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Hello Lenat, welcome to the gang. You'll learn a lot from the good folks here. Leather work, woodwork etc. and blacksmithing all go hand in hand. Looking forward to seeing your posts.

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Here's a few topics that might get you started a little quicker with a little less expense. For the anvil  https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/52308-a-collection-of-improvised-anvils/

for the  forge https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/44842-just-a-box-of-dirt-or-a-simple-side-blast-forge/For

Welcome aboard, good luck, be safe, and remember it's supposed to be fun. 

Pnut

 

 

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Thank you for the warm welcome everyone! J have a lot of ready to do! If you have any more information to share please do!

Len

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The site is bursting at the seams with info. A jabod forge really does work, I've even welded in it. I have to admit that I was somewhat skeptical in the beginning but I love them now. If I'd have known how little I could actually get started for I would have done it a lot sooner. 

Pnut

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This is a good bunch, many members I count as friends. Depending on how good of a scrounge you are we can get you going from anything from $0-100 (much more if you just throw money at it). There are amazing things people here do with metal (and they are willing to teach you how!) I would suggest you do go to the classes you mentioned as it will really jump start your skills. It’s slow going alone. 

Wish I had knew about your interest before you left, I would have sent you with a basic kit.

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Welcome aboard... There are a lot of You Tube video's out there that are down right dangerous when it comes to blacksmithing. Fortunately there is a good section on them here, all have been vetted and recommended.

https://www.iforgeiron.com/forum/174-reference-materials/

This is a good thread on how to get the best out of the forum and keep the moderators happy.:)

READ THIS FIRST

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Welcome! I saw in your other thread that you're doing tour guide work in Williamsburg. The smiths at Colonial Williamsburg are awesome and definitely worth getting to know if possible. I met Mark Sperry and Aislinn Lewis at Quad-State last fall, and just watching them demonstrate for a day and a half was an education in itself.

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I'm trying to build up my street cred to loiter around the blacksmiths. Gotta get your foot in the door somehow right?

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How's the progress coming in regards to your first forays into the wonderful world of blacksmithing. Any updates on a forge or anvil? The best advice I can give you is to not get too bogged down with research. You can spend forever researching and never get around to actually forging. I'm not saying research isn't great and necessary just that it can sometimes paralyze you. I noticed that in the beginning it seemed like the more research I did the farther I would think I was from actually getting started. Find an afternoon when you have a few free hours and get a jabod together and build a fire. It's not going to  last forever anyway so If it's less than ideal it won't matter because they're easily modified and after a few sessions you'll have a better understanding of what it really takes to make a better jabod. They're amazing for teaching you what you need to know when it  comes to jabod design.  Good luck and keep us posted 

Pnut

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Or you could ask how they make the fire look soooo realistic. 

 

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Building on what Pnut said; it can be helpful bringing in something you have made and asking for pointers on how to improve it.  This shows the smiths that you are actually DOING something and not just playing at being a smith on the internet.

Then bringing in the improved version shows that you can listen and follow suggestions; another plus!

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1 hour ago, Lenat said:

I'm trying to build up my street cred to loiter around the blacksmiths. Gotta get your foot in the door somehow right?

Oh GEEZE, STREET CRED!?:rolleyes: Blacksmithing doesn't swing that way, we're simple physics without doing the calculations, we just do the directed energy = work version. Walk in the door when you have time and ask if you can watch or simply tell them you want to learn. 

If you're polite you have all the "cred" you need. Watch listen give it a try and pay attention. Blacksmithing is about failure analysis and correction, it's not a big deal, most of us aren't formal sorts. The best way to get your foot in the door is to step in and say hi. Just like here, we're pretty friendly and dearly LOVE to spread the addiction called blacksmithing. :) 

Frosty The Lucky.

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To be totally welcomes into a blacksmith group, bring some cookies (home made or store bought) as hello - how are you.  Bring a notebook and pencils and actually take notes. There is more information to learn than you can remember so notes are great tools for jogging your memory when you get home.  Take what you learn to the forge and try it out.  Bring it to the next get together so they can see that you are really interested, trying, and willing to take lessons and advice. They want you to succeed, they just need to figure out how they can best help you do that.

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Bring cookies?!:o You're actually suggesting she bring cookies? What you trying to do get her elected president or something?

Seriously, bringing nibbles to a meeting is always a good idea, watching folks work and telling tall tales builds an appetite. 

We get together to share ideas, help problem solve and show folk how we do things, it's almost always a friendly gathering. If not there are hammers available to help smooth rough spots. :lol:

I've never been to a gathering of blacksmiths that wasn't friendly and helpful. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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