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I was cutting some more firewood and using the Alaska-Mill on an oak trunk...produced a few pieces with some good grain.  This is an end table, or bench, or some expensive firewood...oak is 2" X 18" X 28" X 18" high.  Wood finish is Minwax Golden Oak and a few coats of water-based polyurethane.  The larger cracks and ant-holes (see black splotches) are filled with clear epoxy (let that stuff dry for two or three days before trying to sand it flat!!).  The legs are 1 1/4" distressed tube, set out at 5-degrees, end braces are 1/2" square, taperd and twisted, leg wraps are 1/4" round, tapered at both ends.  Cross-ties are 3/8" square, twisted, with hooks forged on both ends...turnbuckle is TrueValue Hdwr, painted soft brown.  Metal was wire-brushed, then two coats of Rustoleum Clear Satin.  Leather patches are glued to the bottom of each leg.

When assembled there was a moderate wobble...the legs at each end are welded to a piece of 1/4 X 3 X 9 or 14 (see irregular shape of wood) - loosening the lag bolts on one end and slipping a wood shim between the 1/4" plate and the top took care of  the wobble.  DW has now placed an order for a coffee table from the other end of this oak plank...guess it's time to stand and deliver!!??!!

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Edited by swedgemon
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Looks great except that turnbuckle---perhaps finding a bronze marine turnbuckle and making a virtue of the difference?  Or what about a Spanish windlass done with soft 1/4" steel wire instead?

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There are no Spanish windlass suppliers in Iowa...being in the southwest, you might have immediate access to some.  I'll think on some alternatives next time...possibly use some aircraft cable and fittings.

I am still mulling how to incorporate vehicle steering knuckles/tie rods into table undercarriges...maybe Das has some ideas...

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As a Spanish windlass is made by looping string/wire/rope/cable around two objects and sticking a rod in the middle and twisting it around until it pulls them closer I do not see where that would not be possible in Iowa.  Shoot it was a common way to tighten up farm kitchen chairs using baling wire---at least that is what I used when I did my kitchen chair...As I recall I first read about it on the east coast of the USA from reading a book written in Switzerland.

If you used larger wire it would be a decorative accent.

 

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So that's what that's called, we use them between our gatepost and another post to keep our gates straight(ish). I was always told to just "twist the gatepost" when it started sagging.

The end table is very nice looking I like the wrapping on the legs, but I have to agree with TP about the turnbuckle. It doesn't seem to fit with the rest of the table. Maybe if it were bare metal instead of painted it would blend better. As it is now, MY eye gets drawn to the turnbuckle vs seeing the table as a whole.

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7 hours ago, swedgemon said:

I'll think on some alternatives next time...

I agree about the turnbuckle, why not remove it, put it in the forge and distress the snot out of it. For the overall high value of the table, it would sure be a boost to the aesthetic.

Just looked on fleabay, they sure think highly of their "vintage" turnbuckles - makes me think that I could buy a left-hand tap and die, and go into competition....

Beautiful execution, by the way, inspires me to follow my intuition concerning a number of woods curing on my property.

Robert Taylor

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Many thanks for all of your comments and guidance - since the turnbuckle is easy enough to remove, I'll try wire-brushing and/or heating it (don't know whether it is galvanized, but I can put it in a fire outside to be sure)...

When discussed with DW, she liked the idea of being able to remove the turnbuckle linkage completely so she can slide a woven tray of magazines under the table...happy wife means happy life...who knew?? 

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Most turnbuckles are plated; the ones that are not tend to be very pricey---like the naval bronze ones. The old ones in the scrapyard tend to be in very poor shape out here; the local dirt is an excessive ruster.

I would not burn it off until you know which plating it used---turns out that zinc is one of the less toxic ones---and it can kill you!

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The screw-eyes appear to be steel, maybe some kind of shiny plating - the "tube" is most likely die-cast pot metal.  I beat the snot out of all three pieces, then hit them with some clear satin Rustoleum.  I think, and, more importantly, the wife thinks, it looks good.  And now, to work on her coffee table...

Again, thanks for expressing your opinions and guidance - us old guys need all the help we can get!!

 

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44 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Any kryptonite issues out your way?

Apparently, I am in the final throes of acute Kryptonite poisoning - accidentally left a piece in my shop coat pocket a couple of weeks ago. 

Re-read the OP, Cleaned my glasses. Thanks, Thomas Powers.:wacko:

Robert Taylor, grovelling fool for hire

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No need to grovel; we all have kryptonited moments.

I myself look to be increasing my level of cyborgity coming up and it will be interesting to see how that affects my perceptions---possibly getting a "closed loop" system for my Diabetes. Oh Joy; more holes in my hide on an ongoing basis!   They do seem to not grasp that my lifestyle involves some vigorous physical activity.  Perhaps wearing a kilt will keep the sensors from being rubbed by my clothing.  

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That must be the missing ingredient to the magic weld. In addition to the hammer anointed with the blood of virgin wool and the anvil with an egg balanced on end on the horn pointing true north at high noon on the summer solstice, you must bare yourself to the gods of the craft. Only then can they truly judge if you are worthy of their favor.

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Feel Free; just remember to invite me to the tool sale when you get out of smithing...  I will say that a good heavy layer of sweat does a pretty good job for scale pops occurring above the leather miniskirt.

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