Papafrog

Another Arm&hammer

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I've been building a small metal shop. Got this in barter from some work i did. Id like to learn as much as i can about it. Thanks for your time. CHEERS20191128_131319.thumb.jpg.f1f9fdff83db885b3a3a8cbcc4b9e6bb.jpg20191128_130505.thumb.jpg.0fe6da79ce7567431748680d407ae9f6.jpg. Rings nice with a small ball peen. Didn't have a bearing. 

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Welcome to IFI... Great looking A&H and I'm sure those who know a lot more about them than I will be along to add info. Hope you have read about not doing any grinding, milling or welding on the hardened steel face. I always suggest reading this to get the best out of the forum. READ THIS FIRST

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I *believe* that A&H was an American anvil company. It looks to have a welded steel face plate. Very good condition! I don't know as much about the history of A&H as Hay Budden but that is a very nice anvil! I hope you make many great things on it.

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Thanks for the welcome, and for the info. I hope to put it to good use. I'm curious about the serial #. Can I assume that there being only 3 that's it's an early production? CHEERS!

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I thought Trentons were made by Columbus Iron and Forge. Two different companies with similar names. I don't have AIA to refer to right now- just rapidly fading memory.

Steve

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The earliest Arm and Hammer Mr Postman posted in AIA is 162 and had an approximate date of 1900. Appears to be in great condition!

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Oh wow. So that means what for this one? 1900 or earlier? Is there another reference to go to other than AIA? This is getting interesting.CHEERS!

 

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By 1901 the S/Ns were in the 4000 range and 1900 is the first year of production so can’t be any earlier. I have not seen or heard of any other anvil reference material. That was the driving factor, according to Mr. Postman, for his greatly appreciated research and writing of the book.

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Definitely TWO anvil manufacturers in Columbus OH; (I've been to both locations where they were.)  Along with Columbian anvils in Cleveland, it makes Ohio a big anvil producing state!

Note that all three Brands: Columbian, Arm & Hammer and Trenton were great anvils!

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