Jonnytait

List of anvil makers 2019

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The big blu anvil 260 LB is priced the same s the Centurion (260) Nimba anvil. I buy a Nimba anyday. 

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I once owned a 198# HB swell horned Farrier's anvil with an exceedingly narrow face and exceedingly big horn.  My work didn't profit from the narrow face and so I traded it for an anvil that I would use more.  Knowing what you need and then getting the anvil that's best for that has been the way to go for centuries!

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I agree with that TP, do you have any recommendations for people who would benefit from a heavy narrow faced anvil? as in modern anvil makers.

also, Benona blacksmith and Marc1, without posting a link is there a price list available for these anvils? (BIG BLU)

Edited by Jonnytait
doiting

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21 hours ago, Benona blacksmith said:

Toronto blacksmith also has cast a batch of anvils.

I think we should wait for confirmation before adding him to the list. I'm also wondering what people think about adding folks who do custom or limited-run production, but not as a regular thing? 

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Yes, of course when buying a new anvil, you have to consider what you intend to forge on it and choose accordingly. Farriers favour narrow anvils, decorative/ architectural work benefits from a wide face possibly with a side shelf. Bladesmiths i suppose would probably benefit from a narrow face, but i don't really know that one.

As for prices, to pay ~$2000 for a 260# Blu, or $2000 for a 260 Nimba Centurion or ... to pay $2200 for a the best anvil, spanking new shiny beautiful polished 275# Refflinghaus model 57 .... is a no brainer. :)

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Bladesmiths like lots of sweet spot face room to work generally; though it can be done very well on a 4"x4" post anvil. 

Ornamental work likes the later American anvils with long tapering horns and heels---if they can't get a southern german double horn style anvil. 

Heavy work goes well on the English fat waisted anvils that are almost all sweet spot on the face.

Varmint squashing was the preserve of the Sear's catalog anvils.

One can but dream of having a different anvil for every facet of the craft....

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It should be noted that a couple of the manufacturers listed as USA import their castings from China or other 3rd world countries. They are sold in the USA but not manufactured here. Hopefully some people still care about domestic manufacturers. Buy American! 

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